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Job Application Email Examples and Writing Tips

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How To Apply for a Job via Email

  • What To Include in Your Job Application Email

Tips for Writing an Application Email

Job application email examples, frequently asked questions (faqs).

There are several different ways to apply for jobs, including by email. How you’ll apply will depend on the company and the position for which you’re applying. In many cases, you’ll submit your application through an online job site or the employer’s job site. For some jobs, particularly retail and hospitality positions, you may be able to apply in person.  

A common way to apply for jobs is by sending an application letter, along with a resume, via email. This is especially the case with smaller employers without automated application systems. If the employer wants email applications, it will be noted in the job posting.

Here’s how to apply for a job when an employer asks you to email your application, including what to send, writing tips, and examples. 

Key Takeaways

  • Take the time to write a cover letter and use it to show the hiring manager why you're a well-qualified candidate for the job.
  • Add a signature to your email, including your phone number, email address, and LinkedIn URL, so it's easy for the employer to get in touch.
  • Be sure to include your name and the job for which you're applying in the subject line of the message, so your email is sure to get opened and read.

What’s the best way to use email to apply for jobs? What’s most important is to follow the application instructions in the job posting and only send a resume and cover letter by email if the employer requests it. If the company requests additional information, be sure to include that as well.

Use a professional email account.   The email account you use to send your application should be a professional one. If you’re applying for a lot of jobs, you may even want to set up an email account just for job searching. You will be able to easily keep track of your applications because they won’t be mixed in with your personal email. If you use an online email service (Gmail, for example), you’ll be able to access your messages from any device. When you set up the account, try to use a variation of your name, such as firstname.lastname@email.com. 

Have your resume ready.  Most employers will ask you to send them a copy of your resume, and some will request a cover letter as well. Microsoft has a free version of Word (Word for the web) that you can use to create documents online.

You can use Google Docs to create and save copies of your application. If the employer requests Word or PDF documents, save your documents as Word documents or PDFs and then attach them to your email message.

Google Docs and Gmail are free for personal use, and you can store your application materials on Google Drive, which provides 15 GB of free storage.

Choose a file name for your resume.  When you save your resume, include your name in the title so that the employer will know whose resume it is. For example, CalibraKhan_Resume or MichaelCummingsResume.

Be professional.  Just because you’re sending your message via email doesn’t mean you can be casual or sloppy. Take the time to carefully compose your email message and the materials you send with it. Your objective is to get an interview, and you’ll need to make the best impression you can.

Include a cover letter.  When you send your resume, it’s a good idea to include a cover letter unless the company specifies not to send one. This can be included in your email message, or you can send your cover letter and resume as attachments. A cover letter highlighting your qualifications for the job will help get your application noticed by the hiring manager.

Attach your documents.  Before you click send, remember to attach your documents to the email message. In Gmail or Word, click on the paper clip icon to add your application materials to the message. It’s “Attach Files” in Gmail and “Attach” in Word.

Proofread and test your message.  It’s also important to write your correspondence as carefully and accurately as you would a printed letter. Proofread your email and send yourself a test message so that you can be sure that the formatting holds up and your attachments come through.

What To Include in Your Job Application Email 

Your email job application letter is a cover letter that accompanies your resume. This means that the intent of the email is to let the recipient know

  • Why you are writing
  • Which job you are applying for
  • What your qualifications are for the job
  • What you have to offer the company
  • How you will follow up or how the recipient can get in touch with you

When sending an email to apply for a job, it’s important to be concise and to grab the hiring manager’s attention with a well-written message that highlights why you’re a good fit for the job. Your message should include the following:

Subject line:  Since hiring managers receive a lot of emails, make it easy for them to filter application emails. Include your name and the job title you are applying for in the message's subject line. If a job has been assigned a posting number, provide this as well. For example:

Subject Line:  Margaret Hannon – Social Media Marketing Assistant Position (posting #1234)

Salutation:  If possible, address your email to a specific person. If the hiring manager's name is not mentioned in the job listing, you can sometimes discover it by reviewing the company's website. If a name isn't available, you can open with "Dear Hiring Manager," as in the sample letter below, or with the more formal “ To Whom It May Concern .”

First paragraph:  In the first paragraph of your letter, it’s important to explain why you're writing. Mention where you saw the job application, the date when it was posted, and how you found the posting (e.g., presented on the company's website, posted on a job board, etc.).

If you were referred by a friend or colleague, mention it at the beginning of your email. A referral can help you secure an interview.

Middle paragraphs:  This section of the letter is where you can make a pitch for your candidacy. Why would you be a good fit for the job? What can you offer the company? Highlight your most relevant jobs and responsibilities as well as your accomplishments. Make sure not to copy your resume directly.

Final paragraph:  Use this space to thank the recipient for reading your email, and mention that your resume is attached. This is also the place to thank the recipient for considering your application. State when and how you will follow up as well.

Closing:  Use a formal close such as "Best" or "Sincerely" to sign off your letter, then type your full name.

Email signature:  You can also include your email signature, which is an easy way to provide contact information to recipients. List your name, phone number, email address, and LinkedIn profile URL, if you have one. For example:

Margaret Hannon margaret.b.hannon@email.com 555-123-1234 linkedin.com/in/margarethannon

Don't forget about your resume. Attach it to the email message in the  format requested by the employer . If a specific format isn't required, send it as a PDF or Word document.

Review sample email cover letters to help you get started. Just remember to customize your message for every job opening. 

Sample Email Job Application Message #1

Subject : Assistant Communications Director – Joseph Green

Dear Hiring Manager,

Your job posting on Craigslist for an Assistant Communications Director piqued my interest. Your description of the work responsibilities for the Assistant Director role closely matches my experience, and I am excited to submit my resume to you for your consideration.

In my position as an Assistant Communications Director for ABC Company, I wrote articles for the company website, edited and posted contributed articles, managed the company's social media presence, and wrote and sent out a weekly email newsletter to subscribers. I also implemented an automated email tool that grew the company's subscriber base by 40% within six months.

While Assistant Communications Director for Assemblyperson Janet Brown, I researched, drafted, and amended legislation, wrote press releases, and was responsible for office communications and correspondence.

My resume is attached. If I can provide you with any further information on my background and qualifications, please let me know.

I look forward to hearing from you. Thank you for your consideration.

Joseph Green Joseph.Green@email.com 202-555-5252

Sample Email Job Application Message #2

Subject: Adjunct Instructor Position - Jane Lee

Dear Ms. Smith,

I was keenly interested in reading the job posting for the position of Anatomy and Physiology Professor at Middleburg University. I believe my experience is a strong match for the responsibilities pertaining to this role, and I’m pleased to submit my application for the position.

My most recent teaching position was at Amery University, where I taught both anatomy and physiology as an adjunct professor. In addition, I served on two faculty committees and participated in a research project.

I have attached my resume to this letter. Through it, I hope you will learn more about my background, education, achievements, and awards.

If I can provide you with any further information, please let me know. I look forward to hearing from you about this opportunity.

Thank you for your consideration.

Jane Lee Jane.Lee@email.com 454-555-4653

Do you need to send a cover letter when you email a resume to apply for a job?

If a job listing requests a cover letter, it’s important to write one. If it’s optional, a cover letter can help boost your application, but it’s not required.

What’s the best file format to use for a resume sent by email

Resumes are typically sent as Adobe PDF files or Microsoft Word documents. Some job postings specify the file format the employer wants to receive, for example, an Adobe PDF file or a Microsoft Word document. Many employers don’t have a preference and accept both.

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Writing the perfect email covering letter

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Writing a covering email to accompany your CV

If your CV is attached to the email, then use the main body of the email as your covering letter. Tell the employer how you meet their key requirements so that you can immediately make a good impression and entice them to open the attachment and look at your CV in more detail.

  • In the subject line of the email, list the vacancy title, reference number and where you saw or heard about the vacancy
  • Use the body of the email to convince the recruiter in three to five bullet points that you are the right person for the job
  • Send the CV as an attachment clearly labelled with your name
  • Spell-check before sending the email

Email covering letter template

To: Ann Brown

Subject: Project Manager, ETD, Ref No. 1234 Management Today

Attachment: MWoodProjectManagerCVfeb13.doc

I am interested in applying for the above job as I believe my substantial experience in project management combined with my knowledge of the telecommunications sector will be of particular benefit to your organisation.

ABC has an excellent reputation for innovation and having worked on a number of ground-breaking technological projects from the planning to the implementation stage, I believe that I can make a significant contribution to your organisation.

In particular, I have:

  • 10 years’ experience in managing teams of between 5 and 15 people on a variety of complex telecommunications projects
  • An engineering background which gives me the ability to quickly grasp new technical detail and assess implications for operational planning
  • Experience and qualifications in PRINCE2 project management software
  • Superb relationship-building skills enabling project team members to focus on tasks even during challenging times

My CV is attached, providing further information on how my career background meets your requirements. I would welcome the opportunity to meet with you in person to discuss this further.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Tel: 07777 555 555

                           

CV & Email Checklist

Remember, first impressions are very important. The following is a quick checklist before sending off those emails.

newPCM

Your CV attachment if sending in Microsoft Word:

• Arial or Times New Roman size 10–12 for body of text and size 14 for headings

• Standard margin lengths

• Bold used sparingly, principally for headings

• No columns or boxes

• No graphics, photos or Jpegs

• No shading

CV attachment if sending as PDF:

• Checked that recipient/website can upload or view these

CV attachment sending from or to a Mac:

• Double-check format to ensure CV is compatible with recipient’s software

  • Has all the spelling and grammar in the email covering letter been double-checked?
  • Have you specified in the Subject Line of your email the vacancy/reference number of the job for which you are applying?
  • Does the email covering letter state why you are a good candidate?
  • Is the covering letter written formally, using full sentences with bullet points to reinforce key selling points?
  • Have you addressed the individual by name, if known, in the covering letter?
  • Have you labelled your CV attachment with your name?
  • Have you created an email address just for job-searching?
  • Have you included your telephone number in the main body of your email to make it easy for people to contact you?

Corinne Mills is Managing Director of  Personal Career Management , an outplacement and career coaching company.

Corinne Mills is Managing Director of   Personal Career Management , an outplacement and career coaching company who are the official Career Management partners for Guardian Jobs.

Elia is a Guardian Jobs reader. Hear her personal career story and find out how her Personal Career Management coaching programme helped land her ideal job at Google! Watch the video .

If you’re considering a career change, exploring your options or need effective job search support, Guardian Jobs  recommends  Personal Career Management , who offer  Guardian Jobs readers a free career review  to find out how career coaching can help you.  To book: call Personal Career Management on 01753 888 995 or fill in the contact form .

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Nov 9, 2022

How to write a professional job application email with 6 samples and templates

Your email can make or break your job application. Here we explain the process for writing an effective email for a job application.

Blog writer

Lawrie Jones

Table of contents

So, you’re looking for a job and you know that a critical part of your success will be your email application.

In this guide, we explain the process for writing an effective email for a job application. We don’t stop at the first application but provide examples of several follow-up emails for job applications after no response here .

Follow the advice, and you’ll stand the best chance of getting the job of your dreams (or something to fill the time until that comes along).

How to write an email for a job application

The average recruiter receives 250 applications for each post and spends no more than 7 seconds scanning your message (about the same time it takes to tie your shoes).

The key to success is standing out. That doesn’t mean trying to be witty or wacky, but being a pro is the same process you must use through all job application follow-up emails.

What you need to apply to a job via email

Let’s clarify what a job email is. It’s not a cover letter or a CV but a mechanism to deliver them.

Some people don’t bother to spend much time on an application email but get your application email wrong, and the recruiter may not even bother to read your resume or open your application letter.

Why? Because if they’re dealing with 250 responses, they’re actively looking for reasoning to exclude applications – so don’t let that be you!

Each recruiter has their own application process, but there are some pretty standard things that you’ll need to include with every application, including:

  • Cover letter
  • Work samples (optional, but a nice extra!)

Here's a brief explainer if you don’t know what these are.

1. Cover letter

Your cover letter is a formal part of the application process where you introduce yourself, describe your skills, why you want the job, and what value you can add for the business. 

We’re not going to walk you through how to write a cover letter. However, there are some amazing online resources , so start there. 

You can attach your cover letter as a Word document or PDF. It’s essential to use a file that can be downloaded, printed, and shared – so avoid using Google Docs or cloud software.

2. CV (resume)

Your CV is the story of your working life, a snapshot of your skills, and a chance to highlight your achievements. Again, we’re not going to explain how to create a compelling CV , but we recommend using a simple, easy-to-read, and understandable template.

Again, don’t try to be fancy with formats – create a document that can be downloaded, printed, and shared. 

3. Samples of work (optional)

As the experts say, “show, don’t tell.” You can use your application email to showcase your skills and previous results. You can attach a portfolio, photos, or videos or provide a link to your website or social media in your email.

Some tips from us are to introduce examples and explain the impact. Who cares if you designed a great-looking poster? But if that poster boosted sales by 50%, that’s a different matter.

The second piece of advice is only to include a few examples (3 is a great number). Too many appear desperate.

Thirdly, only share work that’s 100% yours. If you worked as part of a team or an organization, make your role clear. Never claim other people’s work as your own.

Finally, be prepared to answer questions on these examples at your interview – including what you did in the process.

Best job application email tips

We’re all about providing information, advice, and terrific tips to help you get ahead of the competition and secure that essential interview.

Here are 7 job application email tips. (Why 7? Because that’s the world’s favorite number , and we couldn’t think of 10.)

1. Send your application email and CV for review

Tip number 1 is the most critical. After proofreading at least twice (or eight times), send your job application email and CV to a friend, colleague, parent, or mentor – or all of them – and ask for feedback, comments, and suggestions.

Your email will give the first impression, so make sure it’s personal, professional, formal, friendly, and favorable.

2. Make a convincing pitch in the email body

Remember that hiring managers, executives, and founders are busy and will not often open or read your full CV. So you’ll need to convince them in the email body that it’s worth their time to read further.

Think of your email as an advert for you:

  • A persuasive subject line gets the attention (and may result in opened email)
  • A compelling email body makes the recipient want to learn more (and may result in opened CV)
  • Convincing CV makes the recipient want to contact you (and may result in an interview)

The most important thing is to reflect the language in the job spec. The recruiter has been straightforward about what they want and who they’re looking for. Using their language can help to establish that the person to fit the slot is you!

3. Make it easy to contact you

Even though you might have all the necessary contact information in your CV, please include them in the email. This reduces the steps between clicks and contact.

Here are some of the things you should include in every job application email: Use this 

  • phone number
  • social media links (LinkedIn and Twitter)
  • portfolio links (optional)

4. Use a professional email address

Sure, the email address you created when you were 12 or first started college was funny then but is it today? Unfortunately, the chances are it isn’t!

Make sure you have an appropriate email address for a job application. Creating a new email address doesn’t cost anything, and setting up alerts on your phone is simple, so why jeopardize your chances with [email protected] ?

(Don’t email this, we don’t know who owns it!)

5. Check the name of your resume file name

We’ve touched on the importance of using the correct formats for cover letters and CVs.

When you create your CV, give the file (Word document, PDF, or whatever) a professional name that can also be identified with you.

You never know where it might end up.

Here’s a formal naming convention: “Name - CV - Position,” for example:

  • Arthur Shelby - CV - Binman at Shelby Company Ltd.

6. Use references if you can

Do you know someone who works or used to work at the company? Or do you know someone who knows someone who works or used to work at the company?

Warm connections are always better than cold emailing (even if it’s unfair). As the saying goes, your network is your net worth, so try to leverage it to your advantage.

7. Include social proof

Have you already done similar work for someone else? Show it!

Social proof is powerful and backs up the statements you may have made in your application email, cover letter, and resume.

Social proof also includes social channels. LinkedIn is used worldwide, so don’t be afraid to drop in a link to your profile. It also creates a connection, so even if you don’t get this job, you’ll be the first to know of the latest opportunities.

Job application email format

Job application emails aren’t the time to get creative or buck the trend. However, there’s an accepted format for all job application emails, which we break down below. 

1. Subject line for job application email

What’s a suitable email title for a job application? You could go crazy and say, “I’m perfect for this job!!!” but that would be silly. Instead, the subject line for your job application email should be simple to read and easy to understand.

The traditional (and still best) approach is to state your name and the job you’re applying for (or a combination of that). Here are a few examples:

Applying for a job probably is the best place to get creative, so stick to a simple subject line for your job application emails. 

2. Email greeting for job application

Your email greeting should be polite and professional. Examples of that include:

  • Dear (an oldie, but a goodie!)

If you know the recruiter's name, then use it. People always love to receive emails addressed to them. One thing to avoid is the phrase “Dear Sir/Madam” or using formal titles such as Mr, Mrs, or Ms. We’ve got a whole world of possibilities, so it’s time we all moved on from traditional (old-fashioned) titles.

3. How to start a job application email

First up, state the purpose of your email. 

  • I am applying for the post of (job name)

Doing this means the person understands what the message is about – which will save them time. Also, in many cases, the person receiving the email won’t be the recruiter, so they can file it away and share it with the person (or persons) who need to see it. 

After that, you’ll need to explain what you’ve included with the email (your resume, cover letter, and examples). It’s always worth providing at least a few positive sentences on the opportunity. Finally, you’ll need to include any requested information, such as salary expectations. 

4. How to end an email job application

There are conflicting opinions on how to end an email job application. We recommend asking for information on the next steps. Here’s how this can work:

  • Please can you provide me with details on the next steps in the process?

This leaves the recipient in no doubt that you’re serious about your application. If they reply, you’ll be reassured that they’ve received your application. Finally, you’ll know the timescales for decision-making, which removes the need to send a follow-up. 

Always ask for the next steps in the process at the end of every email job application. 

5. Email signature for job application

Sign off with your full name, phone number, and social media links (LinkedIn and Twitter), and attach your CV. Provide all information the recipient will need to contact and connect with you. 

Job application email samples

We’ve talked a lot about the process; now, let’s put it into practice! These job application email samples cover 7 common situations you might experience when searching for a job. You’ll get a simple job application email sample, some application follow-up emails, and even how to withdraw an application if needed. 

Use these job application email examples to start your job search, but edit and update them to suit your specific circumstances.

1. Simple job application email sample

This simple job application email sample can be cut, pasted, edited, and amended for pretty much any opportunity. It’s not exciting or innovative, but it provides a structured way to communicate the critical points you need to. 

2. Email introduction for job application sample

The previous email sample covered how to apply for a job, this one is similar, but it’s about introducing yourself to the recruiter. This introduction approach is a great way to make a personal connection and can work well for several situations. 

3. Job application status email sample

We’re clear that you should always ask for details on the next steps in the recruitment process, but as we all know, real life doesn’t always follow rigid plans. This job application status email sample is a way to politely push the recruiter to let you know what’s happening in the recruitment process. 

4. Withdraw the job application email sample

Yes, there are some occasions when you might need to withdraw a job application, in most cases because you’ve got another job.

You don’t need to explain why you’re removing yourself from a recruitment process, but most people usually do (and we have in this withdraw job application email sample). 

5. How to email HR for a job application update

When emailing the recruiting managers, you’ll need to be formal as they decide your destiny. On the other hand, HR teams deal with large volumes of applications, so this short message is fine. Here’s how to email HR for a job application update. 

6. How to write an email to accept a job offer

Hooray, you’ve been offered a job; now it’s time to say yes. Here’s how to write an email to accept a job offer.

Job application email template

Flowrite's email template for job application.

There is no 100% right or wrong way to send a job application. But having an effective email template, using proper grammar, and email format will help, as you need to most likely send many, many emails to land your dream job.

This is where Flowrite comes in. Flowrite's AI-powered smart templates can help you craft better emails.

Our tool turns your words into ready-to-send emails, like this:

Final words on job application emails

In reality, you’ll need to send many job emails, follow-ups , and reminders to get a position.

It’s the way the world of recruitment works, and we know it can be frustrating.

But trust us, by investing some time crafting high-quality job application emails and persuasive follow-ups, you’ll stand the best chance of getting a perfect position.

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Email Cover Letter Samples

cover letters job application email

Including an email cover letter is imperative, so we thought it would be helpful to our job-seeking readers to have sample letters to use as a starting point.

The examples below come from real-life job seeker emails, although we’ve altered the details and contact information. Whether you prefer a “salesy” approach or you’re more of a “direct and to the point” kind of person, choose the template that suits your style. Just be sure to include these key elements in your email cover letter.

Etiquette for Any Email Cover Letter

  • Mention the title of the position you’re applying for in the subject line and body of your email.
  • Explain where you found the job posting or how you heard about the position.
  • Conclude with a subtle call to action to remind the hiring manager of the action you’d like them to take, such as, “I look forward to hearing from you.”
  • List your full name and contact information in your email signature block (not just on your resume attachment).
  • If applicable, quickly explain any questions that your resume may raise. For example, if you’re from out of town but planning to move close to the job location, or you’ve been at your current position for only a short time.
  • Don’t start your cover letter with your name. Instead, introduce yourself in the letter with a relevant qualification and connect it to the position.
  • Keep your cover letter concise. Just like your resume, keep your document to just one page to entice hiring managers instead of overwhelming them.
  • Avoid any spelling or grammar errors in your document. The smallest typo can ruin your chances at the job.
  • Don’t address the wrong company name or the wrong company contact’s name. This could be seen as awful cover letter etiquette and indicate you’re not attentive to details.
  • Don’t ever include your salary requirements unless otherwise directed by the potential employer.

Signature on Email Cover Letter

Without a signature at the end of your email cover letter, you could be missing out on incredible potential job opportunities. This quick snippet of your contact information makes it easy for recruiters and hiring managers alike to contact you.

When it comes to deciding between a physical signature and a name sign-off, there are benefits to either option. With a name sign-off, you can use a digital signature service like Eversign and RightSignature to give your cover letter that personal touch.

If you’d prefer to include just a regular email signature, make sure to include your full name, email and phone number. You can also consider adding a LinkedIn button so the hiring manager can have more insight on your experience and skill set.

How to Format an Email Cover Letter

Wondering how to format your email cover letter? You’re not alone. Once you’ve written your incredible cover letter providing more information on your expertise and how it relates to the job you’re applying for, it’s vital to format it correctly before sending it to any recruiters. If it isn’t formatted correctly, you could be missing out on the job opportunity.

Regardless of the cover letter template you’ve chosen, make sure to include these key components when formatting your email cover letter:

  • Write a subject line that includes the position you’re applying for
  • Address the company contact’s name in the salutation
  • Clearly state what you’re hoping to accomplish in the first few sentences
  • Summarize your strengths, skills and experience by connecting them to the job opportunity
  • Use a font that’s easy to read
  • Avoid typos in your message by proofreading
  • Include a signature with your contact information
  • Always send a .pdf file rather than a word doc or other format

Email Cover Letter Examples for Legal Professionals

Example #1: if you prefer to keep it brief..

Subject Line: Interest in Litigation Associate Position

To Whom It May Concern:

I am interested in the Litigation Associate position advertised on LinkedIn. I have attached my resume and cover letter for your review.

Thank you for your time. I look forward to hearing from you.

Best regards,

First Last Name

Example #2: If you’re relocating to the city where the job opportunity is located.

Subject Line: Expressing Interest and Relocating Near Litigation Secretary Position

Dear Hiring Manager,

I’m writing to express my interest in the Litigation Secretary position listed on Monster.com. My resume is attached for your review and consideration.

I am a fast learner, very dependable, organized, and computer savvy. I have extensive experience assisting firm attorneys and multiple paralegals, as well as supervising and managing an office. While I currently reside in Los Angeles, I will be moving to San Francisco at the end of the month.

I look forward to the opportunity to meet with you to learn more about your firm, its plans and goals, and how I might contribute to its continued success. I can be your ideal candidate if given this opportunity. Thank you.

Kind regards,

Example #3: If a colleague referred you.

Subject Line: John Mentioned Your Firm is Seeking a Litigation Secretary

Dear Sir/Madam:

I was referred to you by a mutual acquaintance, John Smith, who said you have an opening for a litigation secretary.

I have many years of experience as a litigation secretary, most of them working with managing partners. I am a professional looking for a career, not just a job. I am organized, reliable and self-motivated. I like being part of a team, but can also work independently.

Included with this e-mail is a copy of my resume for your review and consideration. Once you have had an opportunity to review my resume, please contact me if you have any questions or to arrange an interview. I look forward to speaking with you in the near future.

Thank you for your time,

Example # 4: If you’ve been at your current position for less than one year.

Subject Line: Experienced Legal Secretary Seeking Long-term Opportunity with Stable Litigation Firm

Please allow this introduction. My name is Jane Smith, and I have 12 years of legal secretarial experience working with managing partners of small, mid- and large-sized law firms. My current typing speed is 105 wpm from written form and 120 wpm from live dictation with the utmost accuracy. I am interested in the Litigation Secretary position advertised on your firm’s website.

I am currently working for a small civil litigation firm. However, after only 11 months in this position, the financial stability of the firm has significantly changed. Therefore I am seeking long-term tenure with a stable civil litigation firm.

Attached please find my resume and list of references. If you are interested in the professional skills and positive attributes I can contribute to your firm, please contact me at [phone number] at your convenience to schedule an interview.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Respectfully,

Example #5: If you want to dazzle the hiring manager with your qualifications.

Subject Line: Do you need a conscientious paralegal at your firm?

Dear Recruiting Administrator:

Do you need a hardworking, creative and conscientious paralegal to meet your firm’s needs? If so, I can help you. The following is a summary of my qualifications:

  • More than ten years of progressively responsible legal experience;
  • Bachelor’s Degree with Honors in Business Administration;
  • Exceptional verbal, written and analytical skills;
  • Advanced computer skills;
  • Outgoing personality and “can-do” attitude.

I would like to meet with you to discuss how I might assist your firm in fulfilling its present needs. 

My resume is enclosed for your review. If you need someone who is highly motivated, eager to learn, and willing to work hard to succeed, please contact me at [phone] or via email: [email].

Thank you for your time and consideration,

Now, start writing your cover letter!

They say the first impression is a lasting one — so make sure your digital introduction represents you well. Use your best judgment with each position you apply to; for an entry level position keep your cover letter more concise while going into further depth and providing more information with upper level positions.

These examples are meant to be a starting point only — add your own voice, style and experience to make your own standout (or at least solid) email cover letter.

Start building out cover letters that will help you stand out and land the job!

The Cut

How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

I ’ve read thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of cover letters in my career. If you’re thinking that sounds like really boring reading, you’re right. What I can tell you from enduring that experience is that most cover letters are terrible — and not only that, but squandered opportunities. When a cover letter is done well, it can significantly increase your chances of getting an interview, but the vast majority fail that test.

So let’s talk about how to do cover letters right.

First, understand the point of a cover letter.

The whole idea of a cover letter is that it can help the employer see you as more than just your résumé. Managers generally aren’t hiring based solely on your work history; your experience is crucial, yes, but they’re also looking for someone who will be easy to work with, shows good judgment, communicates well, possesses strong critical thinking skills and a drive to get things done, complements their current team, and all the other things you yourself probably want from your co-workers. It’s tough to learn much about those things from job history alone, and that’s where your cover letter comes in.

Because of that …

Whatever you do, don’t just summarize your résumé.

The No. 1 mistake people make with cover letters is that they simply use them to summarize their résumé. This makes no sense — hiring managers don’t need a summary of your résumé! It’s on the very next page! They’re about to see it as soon as they scroll down. And if you think about it, your entire application is only a few pages (in most cases, a one- or two-page résumé and a one-page cover letter) — why would you squander one of those pages by repeating the content of the others? And yet, probably 95 percent of the cover letters I see don’t add anything new beyond the résumé itself (and that’s a conservative estimate).

Instead, your cover letter should go beyond your work history to talk about things that make you especially well-suited for the job. For example, if you’re applying for an assistant job that requires being highly organized and you neurotically track your household finances in a detailed, color-coded spreadsheet, most hiring managers would love to know that because it says something about the kind of attention to detail you’d bring to the job. That’s not something you could put on your résumé, but it can go in your cover letter.

Or maybe your last boss told you that you were the most accurate data processor she’d ever seen, or came to rely on you as her go-to person whenever a lightning-fast rewrite was needed. Maybe your co-workers called you “the client whisperer” because of your skill in calming upset clients. Maybe you’re regularly sought out by more senior staff to help problem-solve, or you find immense satisfaction in bringing order to chaos. Those sorts of details illustrate what you bring to the job in a different way than your résumé does, and they belong in your cover letter.

If you’re still stumped, pretend you’re writing an email to a friend about why you’d be great at the job. You probably wouldn’t do that by stiffly reciting your work history, right? You’d talk about what you’re good at and how you’d approach the work. That’s what you want here.

You don’t need a creative opening line.

If you think you need to open the letter with something creative or catchy, I am here to tell you that you don’t. Just be simple and straightforward:

• “I’m writing to apply for your X position.”

• “I’d love to be considered for your X position.”

• “I’m interested in your X position because …”

• “I’m excited to apply for your X position.”

That’s it! Straightforward is fine — better, even, if the alternative is sounding like an aggressive salesperson.

Show, don’t tell.

A lot of cover letters assert that the person who wrote it would excel at the job or announce that the applicant is a skillful engineer or a great communicator or all sorts of other subjective superlatives. That’s wasted space — the hiring manager has no reason to believe it, and so many candidates claim those things about themselves that most managers ignore that sort of self-assessment entirely. So instead of simply declaring that you’re great at X (whatever X is), your letter should demonstrate that. And the way you do that is by describing accomplishments and experiences that illustrate it.

Here’s a concrete example taken from one extraordinarily effective cover-letter makeover that I saw. The candidate had originally written, “I offer exceptional attention to detail, highly developed communication skills, and a talent for managing complex projects with a demonstrated ability to prioritize and multitask.” That’s pretty boring and not especially convincing, right? (This is also exactly how most people’s cover letters read.)

In her revised version, she wrote this instead:

“In addition to being flexible and responsive, I’m also a fanatic for details — particularly when it comes to presentation. One of my recent projects involved coordinating a 200-page grant proposal: I proofed and edited the narratives provided by the division head, formatted spreadsheets, and generally made sure that every line was letter-perfect and that the entire finished product conformed to the specific guidelines of the RFP. (The result? A five-year, $1.5 million grant award.) I believe in applying this same level of attention to detail to tasks as visible as prepping the materials for a top-level meeting and as mundane as making sure the copier never runs out of paper.”

That second version is so much more compelling and interesting — and makes me believe that she really is great with details.

If there’s anything unusual or confusing about your candidacy, address it in the letter.

Your cover letter is your chance to provide context for things that otherwise might seem confusing or less than ideal to a hiring manager. For example, if you’re overqualified for the position but are excited about it anyway, or if you’re a bit underqualified but have reason to think you could excel at the job, address that up front. Or if your background is in a different field but you’re actively working to move into this one, say so, talk about why, and explain how your experience will translate. Or if you’re applying for a job across the country from where you live because you’re hoping to relocate to be closer to your family, let them know that.

If you don’t provide that kind of context, it’s too easy for a hiring manager to decide you’re the wrong fit or applying to everything you see or don’t understand the job description and put you in the “no” pile. A cover letter gives you a chance to say, “No, wait — here’s why this could be a good match.”

Keep the tone warm and conversational.

While there are some industries that prize formal-sounding cover letters — like law — in most fields, yours will stand out if it’s warm and conversational. Aim for the tone you’d use if you were writing to a co-worker whom you liked a lot but didn’t know especially well. It’s okay to show some personality or even use humor; as long as you don’t go overboard, your letter will be stronger for it.

Don’t use a form letter.

You don’t need to write every cover letter completely from scratch, but if you’re not customizing it to each job, you’re doing it wrong. Form letters tend to read like form letters, and they waste the chance to speak to the specifics of what this employer is looking for and what it will take to thrive in this particular job.

If you’re applying for a lot of similar jobs, of course you’ll end up reusing language from one letter to the next. But you shouldn’t have a single cover letter that you wrote once and then use every time you apply; whatever you send should sound like you wrote it with the nuances of this one job in mind.

A good litmus test is this: Could you imagine other applicants for this job sending in the same letter? If so, that’s a sign that you haven’t made it individualized enough to you and are probably leaning too heavily on reciting your work history.

No, you don’t need to hunt down the hiring manager’s name.

If you read much job-search advice, at some point you’ll come across the idea that you need to do Woodward and Bernstein–level research to hunt down the hiring manager’s name in order to open your letter with “Dear Matilda Jones.” You don’t need to do this; no reasonable hiring manager will care. If the name is easily available, by all means, feel free to use it, but otherwise “Dear Hiring Manager” is absolutely fine. Take the hour you just freed up and do something more enjoyable with it.

Keep it under one page.

If your cover letters are longer than a page, you’re writing too much, and you risk annoying hiring managers who are likely sifting through hundreds of applications and don’t have time to read lengthy tomes. On the other hand, if you only write one paragraph, it’s unlikely that you’re making a compelling case for yourself as a candidate — not impossible, but unlikely. For most people, something close to a page is about right.

Don’t agonize over the small details.

What matters most about your cover letter is its content. You should of course ensure that it’s well-written and thoroughly proofread, but many job seekers agonize over elements of the letter that really don’t matter. I get tons of  questions from job seekers  about whether they should attach their cover letter or put it in the body of the email (answer: No one cares, but attaching it makes it easier to share and will preserve your formatting), or what to name the file (again, no one really cares as long as it’s reasonably professional, but when people are dealing with hundreds of files named “resume,” it’s courteous to name it with your full name).

Approaching your cover letter like this can make a huge difference in your job search. It can be the thing that moves your application from the “maybe” pile (or even the “no” pile) to the “yes” pile. Of course, writing cover letters like this will take more time than sending out the same templated letter summarizing your résumé — but 10 personalized, compelling cover letters are likely to get you more  interview invitations  than 50 generic ones will.

  • ‘I Had a Great Job Interview — Why Haven’t I Heard Back?’
  • How to Answer ‘Tell Me About Yourself’ in a Job Interview

by The Cut; Photos: Getty Images

I Asked ChatGPT to Write 3 Different Marketing Job Application Emails — Here's What I Got

Anna Rubkiewicz

Published: February 12, 2024

Here’s a confession: If someone asked me how I was able to land two of the most exciting full-time marketing roles in my career, my first instinct would have been to say that I was just “lucky.”

man writes emails for job applications

A second later, though, I'd be much fairer to myself and admit that I was able to make the hiring manager interested in learning more about me. When you apply for an open role, this first impression usually happens when you send in your resume over email.

The biggest hurdle? Standing out among other applicants in the hiring manager’s inbox.

Download Now: 17 Professional Email Templates

As I’ve been self-employed for over four years now, the last time I applied for any full-time role was years before ChatGPT came to the market.

Still, I wondered if AI is capable of creating an email that would be compelling and personal and, therefore, has the potential to intrigue a hiring company. Also, how much information would I have to include in my prompt to get a satisfactory outcome? I tested three different prompts to see — here’s what I learned.

Table of Contents

What is a job application email?

How to write a job application email.

  • What ChatGPT Wrote For Me

Writing My Own Job Application Email

A job application email is a formal email sent to a recruiter or a hiring manager by someone who’s seeking employment. It aims to express interest in a specific position and to share relevant information on the applicant’s skills and experience.

1. Add a relevant subject line.

On top of applications from candidates, the hiring manager receives tens of other emails every single day.

And while you have no control over how much communication they receive, you can do a lot to boost your job application email visibility.

“Make your intentions clear in the subject line,” says Robert Kaskel, chief people officer at Checkr . “Mention it’s an application, the role in question, and your name. Also, remember that most email providers only display 20-30 characters of subject line text in the recipient’s inbox.”

Kaskel also underlines that you should steer clear of any “clickbait-y” text.

“Nor should you try to create a sense of urgency by using words like ‘Urgent,’ ‘Immediate,’ or ‘Time-sensitive.’ These tactics might work for marketers, but they’re more likely to alienate and irritate a recruiter who may view them as deceptive,” he said.

2. Adjust your tone of voice to the company.

As a marketer, you know that brands use a different tone of voice. Some are more relaxed than others. If you want to stand out from other applicants, try to use a tone of voice that matches the company you’re applying to.

Take a look at the job ad. Is it written in a friendly, humorous manner, or is it super professional? Write your email copy in a way that shows you ‘get’ their communication style.

This is especially important when applying for marketing positions. After all, an ability to adjust to a brand’s tone of voice is something to be expected from marketing pros. Right?

3. Keep it short and relevant.

Whenever I scroll through LinkedIn, the amount of people who apply for a job never fails to amaze me. There are hundreds of applicants within a few hours after posting a job ad. The job market has gotten incredibly competitive.

That said, recruiters have to go through tons of LinkedIn messages and emails. Their time is limited, so keep your email short and to the point.

Make sure that your opening paragraph is catchy. If you make it blunt and irrelevant, the recruiters won’t bother reading the rest.

Kimberley Tyler-Smith, executive at Resume Worded , says, “As a recruiter who‘s seen thousands of applications cross my desk, I can tell you one thing for sure: the generic, formulaic emails blur into a monotonous hum. But the ones that truly stand out? They’re the ones that tell a story.”

A story sparks curiosity, Tyler-Smith notes.

“A well-crafted story hooks me in, making me want to know more about the person behind the words. It‘s no longer just a resume on a screen. It’s a glimpse into your unique journey, your motivations, and your potential.

It reveals your passion, your humor, your resilience — all the qualities that make you, well, you. And in a world of faceless applications, authenticity is gold,” Tyler-Smith says.

She also says that it shows you’re a great fit for the company.

“A story that connects your experiences to the specific role and company paints a vivid picture of why you're not just qualified, but perfectly suited for the job,” adds Tyler-Smith.

4. Include a personal salutation.

Starting your job application email with “Dear Sir/Madam” or “Dear Hiring Team” isn’t the best way to make a good first impression.

If the recruitment manager isn’t listed in the job ad, find out who is responsible for hiring in this specific company. It might require some digging, but it will be worth the effort.

The majority of candidates won’t bother to find out the person’s name, and if you do, you will stand out.

5. Attach your CV and label it correctly.

Remember to attach your CV to your email; if you forget to do it, high chances are your application will be ignored. Also, make sure it’s correctly labeled.

Daniel Kroytor, the founder of TailoredPay , explains why this is so important. “It is not unusual for a job application email to include attachments, but what many do not consider are their labels, and this is why they should look at them carefully before sending,” he says.

He adds that “it is important to remember that you are not the only person who is inquiring about a job opportunity, which means that potential employers will receive dozens if not hundreds of documents, and if they are mislabeled, they could be disregarded or cause HR headaches.”

Max Wesman, founder and COO at GoodHire , further emphasizes the importance of email attachments. He sees them as the most important element of a job application.

Wesman says that “not only do you need to attach the right documents, but they also need to be neatly designed, well-written, and free of any mistakes.”

Attachments allow you to attach documents and add information outside of the basic application format. Wesman notes, “So make sure to attach any fun, interesting, or qualifying documents that can help your case.”

6. Include a personalized section on why you fit the company.

Avoid statements like “I have years of experience” if you aren’t planning to prove how it ties with the company you’re applying to in the next couple of sentences.

Each sentence should help the hiring manager assess how exactly your presence could contribute to the business.

For example, if you’re applying for a social media manager position, you could share a story of a successful campaign that you came up with the idea for and how many leads or sales it generated.

Gianluca Ferruggia, general manager at DesignRush , has a great take on this, saying that candidates should showcase not only their professionalism but also their personal brand.

“This isn‘t simply about using formal language; it’s more about the way a candidate presents their capabilities and achievements. Relating past experiences to the job's requirements helps connect their history with the future role,” Ferruggia notes.

Ferruggia says that the “personal” touch can be, as mentioned above, a company project example or even a professional value that you and the company both share. This will help set your application apart.

“It leaves an impression that the candidate is both proficient in their field and has done their homework, fitting seamlessly into the organization's culture and vision,” Ferruggia says.

What ChatGPT Wrote Me

It’s time to have some fun! I’ve decided to run a little experiment to see if ChatGPT could be of any help when it comes to writing job application emails.

I used three different prompts to see how they would impact the output. Here is what I got.

The prompt: “Could you please write me a job application email for a Content Strategist position at Swooped?”

ChatGPT’s Output

cover letters job application email

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About Expatrio

Job application.

Job application in Germany

After arriving in Germany, finding accommodation, and arranging a health insurance, it's time to start looking for work. And as any job-seeker knows, that means completing as many job applications as it takes until you find the right position.

However, what every job-seeker doesn't know is that a job application in Germany can be a little different to elsewhere. Let's explore the theme a little further and help you land a dream job. 

How to apply for a job in Germany

Check out our tips

Every position is slightly different, and there may be minor variations in specific sectors of the economy. However, in most cases, the process of applying for a job in Germany will run roughly like this. 

1. Research the best areas to work

Firstly, you'll need to know   which jobs are needed in Germany?   There are some excellent resources around which aggregate German jobs data, but the government's   Make it in Germany portal   is probably the best option to start with. So if you're wondering if there are jobs in Germany within your sector it's a great place to begin the journey. 

2. Ensure that your qualifications are recognized

You will also need to   ensure that your   existing qualifications are officially recognized in Germany . Again, the government runs a   handy site   to check whether your degree is sufficient, or additional training will be required. And sometimes, the answer to the question "can foreigners work in Germany" is unfortunately no. If your qualifications aren't in demand or recognized, work will be hard to find. 

3. Search job vacancies

Now you can start searching for specific posts, and   finding jobs in Germany for foreigners is usually surprisingly easy . Make it in Germany   gathers   together a lot of jobs that are suitable for foreign applicants. 

If you are looking for jobs in Germany for English speakers, try resources like   Englishjobs.de   or the German branch of   Indeed . And if you are wondering how to apply for a job in Germany from India​, check out   MonsterIndia . There should be a wide range of potential openings. Or if you are looking for an IT job, you can search on   GermanTechJobs .

4. Complete your application

Next comes the application. This requires an updated resume, a current photograph, and copies of any relevant professional qualifications. See below for information about the   CV   and   cover letter . 

5. Secure a working visa

After being accepted, there's still work to do. When you have   secured a contract , you can then apply for a working visa via a local consulate or embassy. If you already have a six month job-seeker visa, in which case you'll be able to convert that into a long-term permit. 

6. Organize health insurance

Every worker in Germany must be insured , and there are plenty of providers to choose from. This is where Expatrio's expertise and contacts help you to secure a coverage that balances healthcare and value for money. 

Different levels of insurance include different benefits. Whichever you choose, don’t forget that health insurance is compulsory for all!

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The Cover Letter

How to nail this important component in the job application process

The cover letter is a   key aspect   of the job application process, but it's also something that many job-seekers get wrong. So here are some basic do's and don'ts to keep in your mind: 

  • Ensure that you address the correct contact person. If necessary, give the company a call to check that you have the right individual.
  • Be honest about your achievements and abilities, but show your passion and interest in the job you are applying for as well.
  • Stick to the job and its responsibilities, or any qualifications that are relevant to the post. Don't waste time talking about your hobbies or other activities.
  • Add a hand-written signature at the end of the letter. It's a nice human touch and shows that you haven't churned out a form letter for the post in question.

DON'T 

  • Write in large paragraphs without space in between. Use shorter paragraphs where possible, with short sentences that are easy to read.
  • Use slang or informal language. Avoid sounding conversational. Reading the letter back after completion can help to achieve the right balance of personal content and formality.
  • Resort to exaggerations or untruths. Any dishonesty is sure to be exposed, and often jumps out of cover letters as a potential red flag.

Can I get a job in Germany without speaking German?​

The idea of writing a cover letter in German can be out of the question for some people, but as we've seen,   there are plenty of English language jobs in Germany . In these cases, cover letters will still be needed, and the same rules apply - just   translated into English . 

How to structure a typical cover letter

Most cover letters follow a similar template. The   first paragraph   states the full name of the position, and may reference the referrer who informed the applicant about the job. 

The   second paragraph   explains why the applicant is interested, what qualities that have that make them suited to the job, any relevant experience in the field, and discusses how the applicant will contribute to the company in the future. 

The   third paragraph   lets the company know when the applicant is available for an interview (or phone interview if they cannot be in Germany at that time). And the   fourth paragraph   states what has been supplied with the letter (such as a CV and photographs), and includes contact details for the applicant. 

Find out more about this vital feature

Your CV sums up your personal history, and forms a core point of reference for German employers, so it's   vital to get your CV right when applying . 

There are some important   differences   between German CVs and the ones that applicants may be familiar with. Most importantly,   there's no room for boasting or stressing personal qualities on a German CV . So stick to relevant information, instead. And in Germany, CVs tend to include a passport-sized photo in the top right corner, something that US or UK versions lack. In case you need help   translating your CV to German , you can also  book translation services online .

The content of the CV is also slightly different to other countries.   German CVs always start with educational information   (from high school level to postgraduate),   before listing work experience . German employers also tend to be more keen to see supporting documents (such as professional certificates or degrees). These should be supplied along with the CV in either hard or digital formats.

How to create the perfect German CV

If you want to wow employers, keep in mind these simple tips and you should do fine: 

  • Education first, then work, then anything else.
  • Keep it short. Two pages is routine.
  • Remember the photo in the top right corner.
  • Include your address, email address, phone number, date of birth, and full name at the top of the document.
  • Use bullets to list your accomplishments in jobs or academic courses.
  • If you have any gaps, be sure to provide a short explanation.
  • Don't include reference addresses. Instead, you'll need to secure written references to send to your prospective employer.

When applying for your visa

This advice also applies to the one page CV for German visa​ applications, and it's a good idea to write both at the same time. The shorter format doesn't require so much detail - just stick to the length of your stay, what kind of work you are seeking, and your professional qualifications. 

The Job Interview

The final step to get your dream job

If your cover letter and CV are successful, you'll be invited for a job interview. And - as with every other stage of the process,   it's important to get the interview right if you want to succeed . So, here are some tips: 

  • Make sure you are completely punctual. Any lateness could kill your chances.
  • Dress smartly - even if your work attire is relatively informal. Press your trousers, iron your shirt, and make sure any stains are brushed off before attending.
  • Never criticize past employers or colleagues. Keep things objective and neutral, if possible.
  • Stay engaged, feel free to ask questions, and don't just drone on and on. Employers appreciate applicants who show initiative and can hold a conversation.
  • Be confident about what you have accomplished, and state your achievements clearly - without sounding boastful. And never exaggerate.
  • Do some research about your potential employer. Find out about their leaders, product areas, achievements, and goals.
  • Never overreact. Expect interviewers to be fairly direct, even rude in some cases. They will try to test your initiative and resolve, so don't take their tactics personally.
  • Come prepared with a pen and notepad, preferably with some intelligent questions ready to ask.
  • Eye contact is important, but don't overdo it. When asking questions, be direct and confident, but try to relax as well.

Employers want to see evidence of effective collaboration and cooperation - not personal dominance. So even if you are super-confident, try to help your team members and work with them, not against them.

In general,   the process of applying for work in Germany isn't as daunting as it may seem . So don't worry too much about questions like how do I apply for a job in another country​?

Just use the resources available and come up with a killer cover letter and CV!

We're building the best solution for internationals coming to Germany.

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COMMENTS

  1. How To Send an Email Cover Letter (With Steps, Tips and Example)

    1. Follow company instructions Email cover letters can generally be sent in one of two ways: as an email attachment or as the body of your email. Before sending your cover letter, check the company's job application guidelines. Some companies prefer attachments, while others prefer them to be in the body of your email message.

  2. How To Write An Email Cover Letter: Samples + 5 Writing Tips

    1. Make it easy to read The average recruiter spends very little time looking at an email. If you want your job application to stand a chance, your email cover letter format must be clear and easy to read, even on a smartphone. Each paragraph should only be one to three sentences long.

  3. Email Cover Letter: 5 Samples & Writing Guide + Expert Tips

    11/08/2023 Email Cover Letter: 5 Samples & Writing Guide + Expert Tips How do you write an email cover letter? Should you format it differently? Should you attach it? See 5 examples for different jobs to write a cover letter email that gets results. Tom Gerencer, CPRW Career Writer at ResumeLab

  4. Email Cover Letter Examples and Formats

    Email Cover Letter Examples . Most cover letters follow the same basic format, but the contents will be very different, depending on your goals and circumstances. These templates cover a wide range of situations, from a cold email inquiring about job openings to an internal job promotion cover letter to a job transfer request.

  5. Job Application Email Tips, Template and Examples

    1. Prepare your documents The first step in composing an application email is to get the documents you will include in the email ready to be sent. These will likely include your resume and cover letter as well as additional documents requested for the position such as examples of your work.

  6. How to Send an Email Cover Letter (Samples & Tips)

    Either. But not both. My suggestion is—if you're applying by email, you're risking that your message will reach the hiring manager in a hurry, so don't make them open TWO attachments. Write your cover letter in your email body and enclose only your resume. 1 Open Your Email Cover Letter with a Strong Subject Line

  7. Sample Cover Letter for a Job Application

    Key Takeaways An application letter accompanies a resume and may be uploaded to a job portal, sent via email, or even sent by postal mail, depending on the employer's requirements. Application letters are an ideal way to show your interest in a job and highlight your most relevant skills.

  8. 11 Steps To Email a Cover Letter

    If you're in the process of a job application, here's an overview of how to email a cover letter: 1. Review the job listing The job posting outlines the duties of the successful candidate, the qualifications of the ideal candidate, and other relevant information about the hiring process.

  9. Job Application Email Examples and Writing Tips

    For example: Subject Line: Margaret Hannon - Social Media Marketing Assistant Position (posting #1234) Salutation: If possible, address your email to a specific person. If the hiring manager's name is not mentioned in the job listing, you can sometimes discover it by reviewing the company's website.

  10. Email Cover Letter Example (With Steps and Helpful Tips)

    Updated 1 December 2023 Video: Emailing your application Your CV is polished, and your cover letter is just right - now it's time to compose a strong email to send it off. This short video is your guide on the ideal subject line through to the sign-off. All that's left to do is click send!

  11. 200+ Professional Cover Letter Examples for Job Seekers

    Salutation Dear [Hiring Manager's Name], Opening Paragraph (Introduction) Your cover letter opening should contain a self-introduction. Write about who you are, where your expertise lies, where you found the job posting, and why you want to apply for the job. Body Paragraphs

  12. How to Write an Eye-Catching Job Application Email

    1. Write a clear subject line. The subject line of your email needs to state your reason for writing. A job description may specify what you should include. If not, craft a clear subject line that states your reason for writing and your name. For example, "Application: Position Title, Your Name" or "Application for Position Title: Your name." 2.

  13. Writing the perfect email covering letter

    Writing a covering email to accompany your CV If your CV is attached to the email, then use the main body of the email as your covering letter. Tell the employer how you meet their key...

  14. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    A cover letter, also known as an application letter, is a three- to four-paragraph memo to employers explaining your interest in the job and company and your fitness for the role. It's typically submitted along with your resume in a job application.

  15. Job application email

    Nov 9, 2022 How to write a professional job application email with 6 samples and templates Your email can make or break your job application. Here we explain the process for writing an effective email for a job application. Lawrie Jones Writer

  16. Email Cover Letter Samples

    Mention the title of the position you're applying for in the subject line and body of your email. Explain where you found the job posting or how you heard about the position. Conclude with a subtle call to action to remind the hiring manager of the action you'd like them to take, such as, "I look forward to hearing from you."

  17. How to Email a Cover Letter (Plus Example Emails)

    Updated 2 April 2023 If you're applying for new positions, you may email your cover letter as part of the application process. This process may differ based on your professional preferences, but there are some key steps that most employers expect when receiving cover letters by email.

  18. How To Write a Job Application Email in 8 Steps

    The following is a guide with eight definitive steps on how you should compose and send your job application email: 1. Prepare your documents. Before you compose your job application email, make sure all your documents are ready. Check off the list of requirements the hiring manager has shared with you, such as your resume, cover letter, proof ...

  19. How to Write an Email Cover Letter (With Tips and Examples)

    4. Keep the formatting simple. If the cover letter is in the body text of your email, use simple fonts and formatting to optimise readability. Keep to fonts such as Arial and use a font size of 10-12 for body copy and 14 for headers. Use underlining, bolding and italicising sparingly.

  20. How To Write a Job Application Email (With Examples)

    In some cases, you might write your email as a cover letter. If you write your cover letter as the body of your email, you don't need to include another cover letter as part of your attachments. Related: Email Etiquette: Best Regards and Alternative Salutations How to email a job application

  21. How to Write a Job Application E-Mail (With Templates and Tips)

    1. Assemble your documents. Preparing and including the necessary documents is the first step to creating an email application. Often, such documents include your resume, cover letter and additional documents listed in the job posting, such as a portfolio or relevant work samples. Send documents as either a PDF, Microsoft Word Document or the ...

  22. Job Application Email: Writing Tips And Examples

    Your job application cover letter as an attachment. If you are writing the cover letter in the email body, then you do not require to add it as an attachment. Your CV as an attachment. Any other additional documents that the employer mentioned as a requirement in the job advertisement. Related: Writing a Cover Letter: Tips and Examples

  23. How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

    Instead, your cover letter should go beyond your work history to talk about things that make you especially well-suited for the job. For example, if you're applying for an assistant job that ...

  24. Information Technology Cover Letter Examples and Templates for 2024

    How To Write an Information Technology Cover Letter. A great IT cover letter has five main elements: 1. Heading. Use a professional template to enhance the style and presentation of your cover letter. Be sure your heading includes: Your name, title, and contact info; The current date; The addressee's details; 2. Salutation.

  25. I Asked ChatGPT to Write 3 Different Marketing Job Application Emails

    It included all elements that should appear in a job application email, like a personalized salutation, info about previous experience, a resume, and thanks for the consideration. Overall, I could potentially treat it as a first draft. Version 2. The prompt: Write me an email for a job application as the Content Strategist at Swooped. Suggest a ...

  26. How to write an operations manager cover letter (With examples)

    Follow these four steps for the proper format of an operations manager cover letter: 1. Open with a greeting. A cover letter follows a business letter format, so you can start your letter by addressing it to the hiring manager. It's best to find out who reviews the job applications at the company you apply to so that you can address the letter ...

  27. Sending Your Job Application by Email: Tips and Examples

    Use the right email address. Make sure that you are using a professional email address. Sending an email application from an email address such as [email protected] can be seen as an immediate disqualification because it's unprofessional. Consider using an email that uses your first and last name or initials only, such as [email protected].

  28. Job Application

    In these cases, cover letters will still be needed, and the same rules apply - just translated into English. How to structure a typical cover letter. Most cover letters follow a similar template. The first paragraph states the full name of the position, and may reference the referrer who informed the applicant about the job.