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How to Write a Survey Report

Last Updated: February 16, 2024 Approved

This article was reviewed by Anne Schmidt . Anne Schmidt is a Chemistry Instructor in Wisconsin. Anne has been teaching high school chemistry for over 20 years and is passionate about providing accessible and educational chemistry content. She has over 9,000 subscribers to her educational chemistry YouTube channel. She has presented at the American Association of Chemistry Teachers (AATC) and was an Adjunct General Chemistry Instructor at Northeast Wisconsin Technical College. Anne was published in the Journal of Chemical Education as a Co-Author, has an article in ChemEdX, and has presented twice and was published with the AACT. Anne has a BS in Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, and an MA in Secondary Education and Teaching from Viterbo University. wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, several readers have written to tell us that this article was helpful to them, earning it our reader-approved status. This article has been viewed 397,803 times.

Once you have finished conducting a survey, all that is left to do is write the survey report. A survey report describes a survey, its results, and any patterns or trends found in the survey. Most survey reports follow a standard organization, broken up under certain headings. Each section has a specific purpose. Fill out each section correctly and proofread the paper to create a polished and professional report.

Writing the Summary and Background Info

Step 1 Break the report up into separate sections with headings.

  • Table of Contents
  • Executive Summary
  • Background and Objectives
  • Methodology
  • Conclusion and Recommendations

Step 2 Write a 1-2...

  • Methodology of the survey.
  • Key results of the survey.
  • Conclusions drawn from the results of the survey.
  • Recommendations based on the results of the survey.

Step 3 State the objectives of the survey in the background section.

  • Study or target population: Who is being studied? Do they belong to a certain age group, cultural group, religion, political belief, or other common practice?
  • Variables of the study: What is the survey trying to study? Is the study looking for the association or relationship between two things?
  • Purpose of the study: How will this information be used? What new information can this survey help us realize?

Step 4 Provide background information by explaining similar research and studies.

  • Look for surveys done by researchers in peer-viewed academic journals. In addition to these, consult reports produced by similar companies, organizations, newspapers, or think tanks.
  • Compare their results to yours. Do your results support or conflict with their claims? What new information does your report provide on the matter?
  • Provide a description of the issue backed with peer-reviewed evidence. Define what it is you're trying to learn and explain why other studies haven't found this information.

Explaining the Method and Results

Step 1 Explain how the study was conducted in the methodology section.

  • Who did you ask? How can you define the gender, age, and other characteristics of these groups?
  • Did you do the survey over email, telephone, website, or 1-on-1 interviews?
  • Were participants randomly chosen or selected for a certain reason?
  • How large was the sample size? In other words, how many people answered the results of the survey?
  • Were participants offered anything in exchange for filling out the survey?

Step 2 Describe what type of questions were asked in the methodology section.

  • For example, you might sum up the general theme of your questions by saying, "Participants were asked to answer questions about their daily routine and dietary practices."
  • Don't put all of the questions in this section. Instead, include your questionnaire in the first appendix (Appendix A).

Step 3 Report the results of the survey in a separate section.

  • If your survey interviewed people, choose a few relevant responses and type them up in this section. Refer the reader to the full questionnaire, which will be in the appendix.
  • If your survey was broken up into multiple sections, report the results of each section separately, with a subheading for each section.
  • Avoid making any claims about the results in this section. Just report the data, using statistics, sample answers, and quantitative data.
  • Include graphs, charts, and other visual representations of your data in this section.

Step 4 Point out any interesting trends in the results section.

  • For example, do people from a similar age group response to a certain question in a similar way?
  • Look at questions that received the highest number of similar responses. This means that most people answer the question in similar ways. What do you think that means?

Analyzing Your Results

Step 1 State the implications of your survey at the beginning of the conclusion.

  • Here you may break away from the objective tone of the rest of the paper. You might state if readers should be alarmed, concerned, or intrigued by something.
  • For example, you might highlight how current policy is failing or state how the survey demonstrates that current practices are succeeding.

Step 2 Make recommendations about what needs to be done about this issue.

  • More research needs to be done on this topic.
  • Current guidelines or policy need to be changed.
  • The company or institution needs to take action.

Step 3 Include graphs, charts, surveys, and testimonies in the appendices.

  • Appendices are typically labeled with letters, such as Appendix A, Appendix B, Appendix C, and so on.
  • You may refer to appendices throughout your paper. For example, you can say, “Refer to Appendix A for the questionnaire” or “Participants were asked 20 questions (Appendix A)”.

Polishing Your Report

Step 1 Add a title page and table of contents to the first 2 pages.

  • The table of contents should list the page numbers for each section (or heading) of the report.

Step 2 Cite your research according to the style required for the survey report.

  • Typically, you will cite information using in-text parenthetical citations. Put the name of the author and other information, such as the page number or year of publication, in parentheses at the end of a sentence.
  • Some professional organizations may have their own separate guidelines. Consult these for more information.
  • If you don’t need a specific style, make sure that the formatting for the paper is consistent throughout. Use the same spacing, font, font size, and citations throughout the paper.

Step 3 Adopt a clear, objective voice throughout the paper.

  • Try not to editorialize the results as you report them. For example, don’t say, “The study shows an alarming trend of increasing drug use that must be stopped.” Instead, just say, “The results show an increase in drug use.”

Step 4 Write in concise, simple sentences.

  • If you have a choice between a simple word and a complex word, choose the simpler term. For example, instead of “1 out of 10 civilians testify to imbibing alcoholic drinks thrice daily,” just say “1 out of 10 people report drinking alcohol 3 times a day.”
  • Remove any unnecessary phrases or words. For example, instead of “In order to determine the frequency of the adoption of dogs,” just say “To determine the frequency of dog adoption.”

Step 5 Revise your paper thoroughly before submitting.

  • Make sure you have page numbers on the bottom of the page. Check that the table of contents contains the right page numbers.
  • Remember, spell check on word processors doesn’t always catch every mistake. Ask someone else to proofread for you to help you catch errors.

Survey Report Template

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Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • Always represent the data accurately in your report. Do not lie or misrepresent information. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

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Create a Facebook Survey

  • ↑ https://survey.umn.edu/best-practices/survey-analysis-reporting-your-findings
  • ↑ https://www.poynter.org/news/beware-sloppiness-when-reporting-surveys
  • ↑ https://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/assessment/assessing-community-needs-and-resources/conduct-surveys/main

About This Article

Anne Schmidt

To write a survey report, you’ll need to include an executive summary, your background and objectives, the methodology, results, and a conclusion with recommendations. In the executive summary, write out the main points of your report in a brief 1-2 page explanation. After the summary, state the objective of the summary, or why the survey was conducted. You should also include the hypothesis and goals of the survey. Once you’ve written this, provide some background information, such as similar studies that have been conducted, that add to your research. Then, explain how your study was conducted in the methodology section. Make sure to include the size of your sample and what your survey contained. Finally, include the results of your study and what implications they present. To learn how to polish your report with a title page and table of contents, read on! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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How to make a survey report: A guide to analyzing and detailing insights

  • March 8, 2024

The survey report: Meaning and importance

Survey findings, analysis and interpretation, recommendations, use clear and accessible language, structure a report for clarity, provide context, include visual aids, cite sources, proofread and edit, introduction, create a survey with surveyplanet.

In today’s data-driven world, surveys are indispensable tools for gathering valuable intelligence and making informed decisions. Whether conducting market research, gauging customer satisfaction, or gathering employee feedback, the key to unlocking a survey’s true potential lies in the subsequent analysis and reporting of the collected data.

Whether you’re new to surveys or a seasoned researcher, mastering analysis and reporting is essential. To unlock the full potential of surveys one must learn how to make a survey report.

Before diving into the process, let’s clarify what a survey report is and why it’s crucial. It is a structured document that presents the findings, analysis, and conclusions derived from survey data. It serves as a means to communicate the insights obtained from the survey to stakeholders, enabling them to make informed decisions.

The importance of a survey report cannot be overstated. It provides a comprehensive overview of collected data, allowing stakeholders to gain a deeper understanding of the subject matter. Additionally, it serves as a reference point for future decision-making and strategy development, ensuring that actions are based on sound evidence rather than assumptions.

Key components of a survey report

Start a survey report with a brief overview of the purpose of the survey, its objectives, and the methodology used for data collection. This sets the context for the rest of the report and helps readers understand the scope of the survey.

The introduction serves as the roadmap that guides readers through the document and provides essential background information. It should answer questions such as why the survey was conducted, who the target audience was, and how the data was collected . By setting clear expectations upfront, the groundwork is laid for a coherent and compelling report.

Present the key findings of the survey in a clear and organized manner. Use charts, graphs, and tables to visualize the data effectively. Ensure that the findings are presented in a logical sequence, making it easy for readers to follow the narrative.

The survey findings section is the heart of the report, where the raw data collected during the survey is presented. It’s essential to organize the findings in a way that is easy to understand and digest. Visual aids such as charts, graphs, and tables can help illustrate trends and patterns in the data, making it easier for readers to grasp the key insights.

Dive deeper into the survey data by analyzing trends, patterns, and correlations. Provide insights into what the data means and why certain trends may be occurring. The findings must be interpreted in the context of the survey’s objectives and any relevant background information.

Analysis and interpretation are where the real value of the survey report lies. This is where surface-level findings are moved beyond to uncover the underlying meaning behind the data. By digging deeper to provide meaningful insights, stakeholders gain a deeper understanding of the issues at hand and identify potential opportunities for action.

Based on the analysis, offer actionable recommendations or suggestions that address the issues identified in the survey. These recommendations should be practical, feasible, and tied directly to the survey findings.

The recommendations section is where insights are translated into action. It’s not enough to simply present the findings—clear guidance on what steps should be taken next must be provided. Recommendations should be specific, actionable, and backed by evidence from the survey data. Such practical guidance empowers stakeholders to make informed decisions that drive positive change.

Don’t forget to summarize the key findings, insights, and recommendations presented in the report. Reinforce the importance of the survey results and emphasize how they can be used to drive decision-making.

The conclusion serves as a final wrap-up, summarizing the key takeaways and reinforcing the importance of the findings. It’s an opportunity to remind stakeholders of the survey’s value and how the results can be used to inform decision-making and drive positive change. By ending on a strong note, readers have a clear understanding of the significance of the survey and the actions that need to be taken moving forward.

Best practices for survey report writing

In addition to understanding the key components of a survey report, it’s essential to follow best practices when writing and presenting findings. Here are some tips to ensure that a survey report is clear, concise, and impactful.

Avoid technical jargon or overly complex language that may confuse readers. Instead, use clear and straightforward wording that is easily understood by the target audience.

Organize a survey report into clearly defined sections:

  • Conclusion.

This helps readers navigate the document and find needed information quickly.

Always provide the background of findings by explaining the significance of the survey objectives and how the data relates to the broader goals of the organization or project.

Charts, graphs, and tables can help illustrate key findings and trends in the data. Use them sparingly and ensure they are properly labeled and explained in the text.

When referencing external sources or previous research, be sure to cite them properly. This adds credibility to the findings and allows readers to explore the topic further if they wish.

Before finalizing a survey report, take the time to proofread and edit it for grammar, spelling, and formatting errors. A polished and professional-looking report reflects positively on your work and enhances its credibility.

By following these best practices, it is ensured that a survey report effectively communicates findings and insights to stakeholders, empowering them to make informed decisions based on the data collected.

Short survey report example

To illustrate the process, let’s consider a hypothetical short survey report example:

The purpose of this survey was to gather feedback from customers regarding their satisfaction with our products and services. The survey was conducted online and received responses from 300 participants over a two-week period.

  • 85% of respondents reported being satisfied with the quality of our products.
  • 70% indicated that they found our customer service to be responsive and helpful.
  • The majority of respondents cited price as the primary factor influencing their purchasing decisions.

The high satisfaction ratings suggest that our products meet the expectations of our customers. However, the feedback regarding pricing indicates a potential area for improvement. By analyzing the data further, we can identify opportunities to adjust pricing strategies or offer discounts to better meet customer needs.

Based on the survey findings, we recommend conducting further market research to better understand pricing dynamics and competitive positioning. Additionally, we propose exploring initiatives to enhance the overall value proposition for our products and services.

The survey results provide valuable insights into customer perceptions and preferences. By acting on these findings, we can strengthen our competitive position and drive greater customer satisfaction and loyalty .

Creating a survey report involves more than just presenting data; it requires careful analysis, interpretation, and meaningful recommendations. By following the steps outlined in this guide and utilizing the survey report example like the one provided, you can effectively communicate survey findings and empower decision-makers to take action based on valuable insights.

Ready to turn survey insights into actionable results? Try SurveyPlanet, our powerful survey tool designed to streamline survey creation, data collection, and analysis. Sign up now for a free trial and experience the ease and efficiency of gathering valuable feedback with SurveyPlanet. Your journey to informed decision-making starts here!

Photo by Kaleidico on Unsplash

how to write a survey report brainly

How to Write a Complete Survey Report

how to write a survey report brainly

Finding ways to encourage a large number of responses to your surveys is an art. But so is analyzing the data in a way that lets you turn it into actionable insights.

Once you’ve done all the hard work of persuading people, be it your customers or employees , to fill out your survey, the last thing you want is to have all that important data go to waste. 

This happens when surveyors take the answers at face value. The outcome becomes actionable only when you analyze the survey data .

That’s why it’s so important to formulate a complete survey report.

how to write a survey report brainly

What is a survey report?

A survey report is a document with important metrics gathered from customer feedback .

The goal of a survey report is to present the data in a full and objective manner. The report presents all the results that were collected.

A complete survey report includes:

  • Completion rates

Number of responses

Date of last response, survey views, breakdown of answers per survey respondent, breakdown of closed-ended questions.

All of these are calculated or broken down for you within the Survicate dashboard.

Survicate provides survey reports

Let’s analyze why these metrics are important and what they tell you.

Completion rate

The completion rate is the number of questions answered divided by the total number of questions in your survey. 

If you have a survey of 12 questions but most respondents only answered 6 of those, you have a completion rate of 50%.

Depending on the survey tool you use, the completion rate can indicate many things. 

For instance, if most respondents were only asked 6 questions out of 12 because half of the questions were not relevant and were skipped, that’s likely a completion rate you’ll be happy with.

But what if your 50% survey response rate results from people skipping questions willfully? It might suggest that you may need to improve your survey .

With Survicate, you will see responses from partially completed surveys so you don’t miss out on valuable data. 

You need to know exactly how many people responded to your survey to have enough data to properly analyze your survey results . Beware – some forms of survey tools may not count individual respondents, instead just their responses to individual questions.

Hence, it’s important that your survey platform allows you to count how many different people responded, so you can determine whether you have a significant sample size.

How do you determine the survey sample size you need?

This depends on what data you want to analyze – from your entire audience or just those from a chosen segment.

For example, if you are a beauty brand that sells face creams specifically for women over thirty-five, you may find out in your survey that you also have younger women who use your products.

You may decide to segment these responses into separate age groups to obtain the data you want.

So, if you were surveying them on the effectiveness of a new age-defying cream, you may find that the women under thirty had very different responses to those in their sixties. 

This is the kind of data that you could have overlooked but can help you with your marketing efforts (and will result in a survey report that's pure gold!).

If you are using Survicate, make sure to integrate with a distribution tool that gathers demographic data. You can also include demographic-style questions in your survey.

If you’re running a survey for a short and specific time period this may not seem important. 

Still, if you ask customers to fill out a customer service feedback survey after every ticket is closed, you may get years of data. This can help you figure out whether your customer service team is properly trained.

On the other hand, if you introduce a redesign on your website, develop a new feature, or make some other significant change, a long-term NPS or CSAT survey can show you the impact.

When you are able to determine the response time, you can split your data and analyze responses relevant to each new implementation.

You need to know the total number of survey views and the total of unique survey views (the number of total views versus the number of different people who viewed the survey, as some people may have viewed it more than once).

If there is a large disparity between these two totals, this can point to several things.

First, your survey may be targeted at a large audience and the questions aren’t relevant enough for all your respondents to answer.

Respondents may also view the survey and then decide not to take it because:

  • They don’t have the time
  • They don’t have the right device (things like open-ended questions can be difficult and tedious to answer on a small phone screen)
  • They see the first questions and decide that taking the survey isn’t for them

Such insights can let you know whether you need to work on your survey design or customer segmentation.

You want to see the breakdown per respondent so you can see how individuals answered all the questions in the survey. This can be helpful for seeing trends in certain respondents’ answers.

For example, you may notice a pattern that each person who dealt with a particular customer service agent gave a negative response to your Customer Effort Score (CES) survey.

Then you know you need to train that agent and improve their performance.

Within the “analyze” tab, Survicate allows you to click on any response to view the other answers.

Survicate answer breakdown by respondent

And if you integrate with particular tools like Google Analytics or Intercom , you may even be able to capture demographic data and contact the respondents individually.

Survicate captures demographic data

When you think of a survey report, you likely picture graphs and pie charts displaying the data attained from closed-ended questions.

Survicate single-choice question breakdown

This is important for a good survey report because it allows you to take in a large quantity of data at a glance, and can be easily distributed to those who may find the data valuable.

Graphic representation makes survey analysis user-friendly and doesn’t require a lot of time or prior skills to analyze.

In the example below, we can see the NPS (Net Promoter Score) response breakdown – we know that over 75% of respondents are promoting our brand, 3.2% are detractors , and we had 800 overall responses. All of this data is plain to see and easy to interpret.

Survicate NPS survey report

Survey report example

If you’re not sure how to present your questionnaire results, choose a survey tool that will prepare a mockup for you. Make sure the software you use doesn’t just spit out rows of data in a spreadsheet. 

Your survey report should present the most important information in a neat and easy-to-understand way so you can draw conclusions quickly. 

With Survicate, you don’t have to create a survey report manually. You get a results summary within the dashboard, with all the most important metrics ready to screengrab.

Create a perfect survey report with Survicate

Depending on the type of survey you run and the questions you ask, you might see the results presented differently. 

NPS survey report example

With Survicate’s NPS survey report, you can see at a glance all the most important stats you need to be aware of. 

From the total response number to the completion rate, you can sort the stats by date and compare how they fluctuated over time. 

See the most important stats at a glance with Survicate

When you run a survey report with Survicate, you will see a breakdown of all the responses in the form of a graph. What’s more, you’ll be able to review how the NPS score changed over time, which can be helpful in trying to identify any issues with your product or service from the users’ perspective.

Create a perfect NPS survey report using Survicate

We recommend you integrate Survicate with Google Sheets to get live updates in spreadsheets. If you never want to miss out on feedback, you can also integrate your Slack or Microsoft Teams with Survicate for convenient notifications. With the click of a single button, you can jump to survey results and even follow up with the respondent.

Survicate can send survey responses to Slack and Microfost Teams

Create a complete survey report with Survicate

You don’t need a dedicated team to crunch survey insights for you. A great survey platform will organize your respondents’ data into an easy-to-read dashboard and help you start acting on the data you’ve received.

‍Start creating awesome survey reports with Survicate's intuitive survey tool. Now, it comes with a generous free trial that gives you access to all Business plan features for 10 days. Sign up and start collecting feedback today!

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How to write a survey report

How to Create a Survey

How to write a survey report

Tips for an effective survey report.

  • Start with an introduction
  • Use visualizations
  • Focus on key facts first
  • Categorize results
  • Summarize your findings
  • Integrate company branding

Conducting a survey is a great way to gather insights from your target demographic. But you’ll limit the effectiveness of the results if you don’t have the right strategy to analyze and report the information.

Once you’ve published and collected data from an online survey, it’s time to analyze the information and format it in a presentable way. Let’s dive into the ins and outs of how to write a survey report.

Survey report basics

You conduct research because you want to answer a question. Do your customers like your product? Why or why not? Did your customers get good service from the support team? If not, how could you improve? One way to find out is to conduct a survey.

The survey report presents the results of the survey objectively, summarizing the responses. Most survey reports show the results in visually appealing ways by including graphs and charts.

It’s important to make the report easy to follow — for example, creating different sections for various survey question categories and using headings and subheadings to call out those categories. Your survey report should be interesting, but always focus on summarizing the information accurately.

Create and share customizable surveys with Jotform.

Survey administration and data collection

Before drafting a survey, consider what you want to achieve, then shape the questions to gather the kind of information that will help you reach those goals. You’ll likely want to include two types of questions :

  • Quantitative. These are questions that yield a numerical response. Some of the most common quantitative questions ask respondents how satisfied they are with a product or service or how likely they would be to recommend a service to someone else. Respondents then have a scale of numbers to choose from. This numerical data can measure variables, and the results fit easily into graphs and charts.
  • Qualitative. These questions gather more details from respondents about their experiences and opinions. As an example, if you were an online retailer, you might ask respondents to describe how you could improve their shopping experience.

Quantitative results are a little easier to present in a report because the numbers can quickly translate into easy-to-understand graphics. When you include qualitative questions, you’ll need to analyze and interpret the responses in text to share the results effectively with others.

Here are a few best practices for creating a quality survey report:

  • Start with an introduction. Set the tone by explaining the purpose of the survey. Provide context for the information you’re presenting.
  • Use visualizations. Images and graphs are an effective way to tell a story. Keep it interesting with different visuals, such as pie charts, bar graphs, and other formats. But make sure to use the type of visual that best demonstrates the results.
  • Focus on key facts first. What are the most critical data points you want to share? Include those at the beginning of the survey report.
  • Categorize results. Group similar data together to show relationships. Consider using headings and subheadings to break up the information.
  • Summarize your findings. At the end of the survey report, give the reader an overview of the information. Include takeaways that you can use to make improvements.
  • Integrate company branding. Look for ways to infuse your brand in the survey report — at minimum, make sure you include your logo at the top of the document and a footer with your company’s information. And don’t forget to select presentation colors that align with your branding guidelines.

The aesthetics of your report matter. Even the smallest details can communicate volumes about your organization. So make sure the survey report is professional and concise while sharing accurate information.

Sharable survey reports

Now that you’ve created your survey report, how will you share it with others ? Here are a few options to consider:

  • Send a URL to a cloud-based report
  • Embed the report on a website
  • Download the report to distribute as a PDF
  • Print a copy of the report for in-person meetings

You may also want to use multiple report-sharing features to accommodate the varying needs of your audience.

Built-in reporting features

If you don’t want to write a survey report from scratch, don’t worry! The simplest solution is to use a survey tool with built-in reporting features. You can pair a Jotform survey template with the Jotform Report Builder to visualize and present data in just a few clicks.

Student Survey Template

Jotform Report Builder makes it easy to convert collected survey data into beautiful visuals and charts. You can use auto-generated reports , but you also have the ability to customize the report layout to match the unique needs of your organization. You can share these survey reports in seconds, and they are updated automatically whenever new responses are submitted.

Additionally, the Report Builder allows you to filter the data in many ways, which is a huge help when it comes to analyzing the information you’ve collected. You can use these powerful insights to improve your business and meet the needs of your customers more effectively.

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Lalisaa Lamesa - Profile picture

317 days ago

Choice of the question and answer

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More than a year ago

Can you please provide a draft of a survey report?

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Can you please provide me demo of a survey

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Survey Results: How To Analyze Data and Report on Findings

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In this blog, learn how to effectively analyze dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110320">survey data and report on findings that portray an dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110365">actionable insights story for key dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110354">stakeholders .

Table of Contents: 

How to analyze survey results.

  • How to present survey results 
  • How to write a survey report
  • Common mistakes in analyzing survey results
  • Best practices for presenting survey results

How quantilope streamlines the analysis and presentation of survey results  

Analyzing dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110318">survey results can feel overwhelming, with so many variables to dig into when looking to pull out the most actionable, interesting consumer stories. Below we’ll walk through how to make the most of your dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110320">survey data through a thorough yet efficient analysis process.

Review your top dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110324">survey questions

Begin your data analysis by identifying the key dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110324">survey questions in your dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110367">questionnaire that align with your broader market dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110338">research questions or business objectives. These are the questions that most closely relate to what you’re trying to achieve with your research project and the ones you should focus on the most. Other variables throughout your survey are important - but they may be better leveraged as cross-analysis variables (i.e. variables you filter down major questions by) rather than ones to be analyzed independently. Which brings us to our next step...

Analyze and cross-analyze your dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110335">quantitative data

dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110335">Quantitative survey questions provide numerical information that can be statistically analyzed. Start by examining top-level numerical responses in your quantitative data (ratings, rankings, frequencies) for your most strategic dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110324">survey questions . Think about which variables might tell an even richer and more meaningful story when cut by dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110347">subgroups (i.e dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110337">cross-tabulation )- such as looking into buying behavior, cut by a dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110328">demographic variable (gender, age, etc). This deeper level of analysis uncovers insights from dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110342">survey dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110319">respondents that may not have been as apparent when examining survey variables in isolation. Take your time during this step to explore your data and identify interesting stories that you’ll eventually want to use in a final report. This is the fun part! At least us at quantilope think so...

Consider dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110346">statistical analysis

Next, run dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110346">statistical analysis on relevant questions. Traditional agencies typically require the help from a behavioral science/data processing team for this, but many automated platforms (like quantilope) can run dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110346">statistical analysis without any manual effort required.

dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110339">Statistical significance testing provides an added layer of validity to your data, giving dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110354">stakeholders even more confidence in the recommendations you’re making. Knowing which dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110345">data points are significantly stronger/weaker than others confirms where you can have the most confidence in your data.

  Back to table of contents

How to present survey results

Data is a powerful tool, but it's only valuable if your audience can grasp its meaning. Visual representations of your dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110335">quantitative data can offer insights into patterns or trends that you may have missed when looking strictly at the numbers and they offer a clear, compelling way to present your findings to others.

dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110336">Data visualization can sometimes be done while you’re analyzing and cross-analyzing your data (if using an automated platform like quantilope). Otherwise, this is the step in your insights process when you’ll take the findings you found during the analysis stage and give them life through intuitive charts and dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110321">graphs .

Below are a few steps to clearly visualize insights once you dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110352">collect data :

Choose your chart types:

The first step is to select the right chart type for your data based on the dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110369">type of question asked. No one chart fits all dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110351">types of data . Choose a chart that clearly displays each of your dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110345">data points ’ stories in the most appropriate way. Below are a few commonly used chart types in dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110370">market research :

Column/ dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110368">bar dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110321">graphs : Great for comparing categories.

Line charts: Show trends and changes over time compared to an initial dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110331">benchmark (great for a brand tracking survey ).

dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110334">Pie charts : Used to display parts of a whole.

Scatter plots: Visualize the relationship between two variables (used in a Key Driver Analysis! ).

dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110356">Word clouds : Good for concise dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110358">open-ended responses (i.e. brand names) to see which words appear biggest/smallest (representing the volume of feedback, respectively).

The right chart type will clearly display meaningful patterns and insights. quantilope’s platform makes it easy to toggle between different chart types and choose the one that best represents your data - significance testing already included!

Leverage numerical tables:

Sometimes, nothing beats the precision and detail of a well-structured numerical table. When you need to provide exact values or compare specific dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110345">data points , numerical tables are your go-to. When using numerical tables to present your findings, make sure they are:

Clear: Use explanatory headings and proper, consistent formatting.

Concise: Present only the essential data without unnecessary clutter.

How to write a dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110332">survey report  

Lastly, take your data analysis - complete with chart visualizations and dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110346">statistical analyses , and build a final report such as a slide report deck or an interactive dashboard.

This is where you’ll want to put your strategic thinking hat on to determine which charts, headlines, graphics, etc., are going to be most compelling/interesting to final dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110354">stakeholders and key decision makers; them buying into your data is not done purely on the data itself, rather how you organize and present it. 

Below are a few considerations when building and writing your final dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110332">survey report :

Start with dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110340">methodology :

Start by clearly describing how you designed and administered your survey to dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110319">respondents . Include details like:

Sampling methods: How were participants selected ( random, convenience, representative )

dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110327">Sample size : How many people participated in your study?

Sampling timeframe: When did your study run?

Survey format: Where did you administer your survey? (online, phone, in-person, etc.)

Question types: dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110348">Multiple choice , dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110323">open-ended questions , dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110361">likert scales , and so on.

Advanced methods: Did you leverage any advanced dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110340">methodologies beyond standard usage and attitude questions such as NPS ( dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110341">net promoter score ) for dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110349">customer satisfaction or a segmentation for need-based dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110362">customer feedback ?

Your methodology background knowledge is helpful to those reading your report for added context and credibility. You can also use this section of your report to define any complex dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110340" style="background-color: transparent;">methodologies used in your study that might require added explanation to readers without a dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110370" style="background-color: transparent;">market research background.

Craft a story:

Don't make the mistake of throwing dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110345">data points at your audience. Part of reporting on your dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110359">online surveys includes crafting narratives that tie your data findings together to sell your story to your audience. What patterns emerge? Are there any surprises? Embed these stories into your charts through headlines and chart descriptions, and tie them back to your research objectives whenever possible. Think carefully about the following when crafting your data story:

The big takeaway: What's the core message you want to convey?

Context: Why does this story matter in the greater scheme of your business?

Implications: What business decisions or dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110354">stakeholder actions might come from these findings?

Organize your findings logically by themes or question categories, and include a summary/final takeaway at the end for readers who want a very quick and digestible understanding of your study. Your story is what dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110354">stakeholders and key decision makers look for in dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110370">market research - it’s your chance to impress them and ensure your data findings generate real impact.

Incorporate dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110333">infographics and other visual stimuli:

Aside from data charts, other visual stimuli add richness to your data presentation, making it more digestible and memorable. Consider these added visuals when presenting your data:

dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110333">Infographics : dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110330">Summarize key findings with icons, charts, and text.

Images: Add relatable pictures that resonate with your data and/or audience.

Color: Use color strategically to emphasize crucial points or to emulate a brand’s look/feel.

dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110329">Qualitative data : Include insightful quotes or video responses (if applicable) to add additional stories, trends, or opinions to your report.

Common mistakes in analyzing dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110318">survey results  

Analyzing, presenting, and reporting on survey findings isn’t difficult when using the right tools and following the above best practices.

However, there are some things to keep in mind during these processes to avoid some common mistakes:

Avoid biased results in your final dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110326">survey analysis and presentation by controlling for things like sampling bias and reporting bias. Sampling bias occurs when you don’t use a truly representative sample of your target population; this can skew your results and portray inaccurate/misleadings findings. Reporting bias occurs when you don’t account for personal biases in what you choose to share (i.e. cherry picking the data that seems the most positive or that supports your personal pre-existing idea - often referred to as confirmation bias). Avoid survey biases by having a second (or even third) colleague review your work at each stage before sharing it with final dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110354">stakeholders .

Misinterpreting correlation as dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110343">causation

Just because two variables are related doesn't mean one causes the other. Be cautious about drawing causal conclusions without strong supporting evidence. The only real way to determine dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110343">causation is through a specialized dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110346">statistical analysis like regression analysis.

Looking into every dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110345">data point

Surveys produce a lot of really valuable information, but you need to focus your attention on the dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110360">metrics that generate impact for your research objective. It’s easy to get lost in an dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110325">excel data file or research platform when trying to look through every dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110322">survey response cut by as many variables as you can think of.

Start your analysis by strategically thinking about your research as a whole. What were you hoping to find out from your study? Start there. Once you start exploring your major dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110360">metrics , a story might naturally arise that leads you to further data cuts. Your data analysis should be comprehensive, yet efficient.

Best practices for presenting dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110318">survey results

While the above elements are things you’ll want to avoid in your research analysis, here are some a survey best practices you’ll want to keep in mind:

Know your audience

Tailor your report/presentation to your specific audience’s needs and understanding level. This might even mean creating different versions of your report that are geared toward different audiences. Some dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110354">stakeholders might be very technical and are looking for all the small details while others just want the bare minimum overview.

Keep it simple

Charts and dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110321">graphs should make data easier to understand, not more confusing. Avoid using too many chart types or overwhelming viewers with too much information. What are the charts that absolutely must be included to tell your full consumer story, and which are ‘nice to have’ if you had to pick and choose? Your final report doesn’t need to (and shouldn’t) house every possible dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110345">data point and data cut from your study. That’s what your raw data file is for - and you can always go back to reference this when needed. Your report however is the main takeaway and summary of your study; it should be concise and to the point. Provide enough information for your audience to understand how you reached your conclusions, but avoid burying them in irrelevant details. Any ‘extra’ data that you want to include but that doesn’t need to be front and center in your report can be included in an accompanying appendix.

Communicate clearly

Don't make your audience struggle to decode your visuals. Each chart should have a very clear takeaway that a reader of any skillset can digest almost instantly. More complex charts should have clear headlines or interpretation notes, written in simple language for your audience (non-technical or specialized terms).   Back to table of contents

How quantilope streamlines the analysis and presentation of dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110318">survey results  

quantilope’s automated Consumer Intelligence Platform saves clients from the tedious, manual processes of traditional dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110370">market research , offering an end-to-end resource for dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110367">questionnaire setup, real-time fielding, automated charting, and AI-assisted reporting.

From the start, work with your dedicated team of research consultants (or do it on your own through a DIY platform approach) to start building a dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110367">questionnaire with the simple drag and drop of U&A questions and advanced methods. Should you wish to streamline things even further, get a head start by leveraging a number of survey templates and customize as needed.

quantilope’s platform offers all dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110355">types of surveys - such as concept testing , ad effectiveness , and Better Brand Health Tracking to name a few. Available for use in these surveys is quantilope’s largest suite of automated advanced methods, making even the most complex dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110340">methodologies available to researchers of any background.

As soon as dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110319">respondents begin to complete your survey, monitor dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110344">response rates directly in the fielding tab - right at your fingertips. Get a jump start on dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110357">survey data dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-menu-id-param="menu_term_292110357" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110357"> analysis as soon as you like, rather than waiting for fieldwork to close and to receive data files from a data processing team. Lean on quantilope’s AI co-pilot, quinn , to generate inspiration for chart headlines and report summaries/takeaways.

With quantilope, researchers have hands-on control of their dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110326">survey analysis and reporting processes, for the opportunity to make clear business recommendations based on dropdown#toggle" data-dropdown-placement-param="top" data-term-id="292110365">actionable insights .

Interested in learning more about quantilope’s Consumer Intelligence Platform? Get in touch below!

Get in touch to learn more about quantilope!

Related posts, a full year of better brand health tracking in the soda category, non-probability sampling: when and how to use it effectively, how florida's natural leveraged better brand health tracking.

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  • An ultimate guide to survey report: Best practices & tools

An ultimate guide to survey report: Best practices & tools

Surveys are designed to obtain information and opinions from respondents by asking questions about a topic. Surveyors care about the participants' views and follow a path according to survey results. 

Even if you manage to receive a high number of replies, a survey is not over. Simply put, responses are the data you collect. The survey report is a way to present and interpret this data, apply the findings to your study, and turn them into knowledge.  

This article will explain the definition of a survey report, best practices to follow when creating a survey report, how to create graphics for a survey report and examples with all details.

  • What is a survey report?

You can find out if your customers like your product or services, whether your customers get good service from the support team, or how you can improve the service and your product by conducting a survey.

A survey report is a document that  objectively ,  precisely , and  factually  presents all the pertinent facts about the survey . The survey report  summarizes the replies and objectively presents the survey results. 

It is essential to prepare a survey report when you complete survey research. Most reports include graphs and charts to present the findings in a visually pleasing manner. The report should be simple to read and understand. A survey report usually contains the following:

  • Completion rate
  • Total number of responses
  • Survey views
  • The date range of responses
  • Distribution of survey respondents' responses
  • Closed-ended question analysis
  • The thoughts and interpretations of the researcher/survey owner
  • Best practices to follow when creating a survey report

The survey report aims to accurately and comprehensively communicate the information gathered during the survey. Here are the guidelines to remember while building a survey report:

  • Make an introduction: At the start of the report, specify what the main aim of this survey was when you were starting off. Explaining the survey's purpose will help establish the mood. Give the facts you are delivering context. 
  • Write the most crucial details first: You need to grab the attention of your audience and readers to make your point. Emphasize crucial points at the beginning and make sure the report is logically arranged with distinct headings and subheadings.
  • Use visualizations: A survey report can be effectively presented using graphs and images . Use a variety of visualizations, such as bar graphs, pie charts, and other formats , to keep it interesting. 
  • Include the company branding: Incorporate your brand as much as possible within the survey report. Make sure to add your company’s details in a footer or at the top of the page, along with your logo. You can customize your report with colors suitable for your brand principles.
  • Give information about respondents: Providing information about the respondents in the survey report makes it more reliable and effective. In your survey report, you can include information about the age , education leve l, and gender of the participants.
  • Briefly summarize your results: Give the reader an overview of the data points at the conclusion of the survey report . Provide a succinct and straightforward description of the survey's results. 

Best practices for preparing a survey report

Best practices for preparing a survey report

  • How to create graphics for your survey report

The survey reports are a crucial study component; thus, you must continually offer correct data. Making a survey report is one thing, but making a good survey report is quite another. Therefore, we have shared how to create graphics for your survey report.

forms.app’s statistics page

You can generate an effective survey report through online survey tools. forms.app is one of the best survey maker tool . You can get the survey reports you created on forms.app easily from the statistics page. Here is how to create the graphics for your survey report on forms.app.

1  - Sign in or create a forms.app account: You can get the report graph of your survey that you created with just a few clicks, without writing code on forms.app. First, you can log into your existing account. If you do not have an account, you can create an account in seconds and become a free member.

Sign in or create a forms.app account

Sign in or create a forms.app account

2  - Choose ready-to-use templates or begin to form from scratch: You can choose templates for many topics on forms.app. You can easily design your survey by selecting ready-to-use survey templates . Additionally, you have the option of starting from scratch with your survey.

Choose ready-to-use templates or begin to form from scratch

Choose ready-to-use templates or begin to form from scratch

3  - Edit the questions and customize the survey design: You can edit the pre-made questions according to your needs. The questions can be changed, added, or removed. In addition, forms.app gives its customers access to hundreds of colorful themes. You can select one of the ready-made themes for your survey.

Edit the questions and customize the survey design

Edit the questions and customize the survey design

4  - Adjust the settings and share your survey: After you finish your survey settings, you can save and share it with respondents. You can send a link to participants or embed your survey on your website.

Adjust the settings and share your survey

Adjust the settings and share your survey

5  - Get a survey report graphic: After sharing your easily prepared survey on forms.app with the participants, you can quickly see the answers. After the survey process is over, click on the "results" button above. You can see the statistics and respondents in the “results” section. Thus, you can reach the report graph of the survey you prepared on forms.app.

Get a survey report graphic

Get a survey report graphic

MS Excel or Google Sheets

You can easily create a graph of your survey report on MS Excel or Google Sheets. Here we shared the steps you need to follow.

1  - Open Excel or Google Sheets and create a new spreadsheet. Or simply download your survey data from forms.app.

Open your data on a spreadsheet

Open your data on a spreadsheet

2  - Make sure your questions and answers are in different columns. 

Have your questions and answers in separate columns

Have your questions and answers in separate columns

3  - Move your mouse over the cells that hold the answer data and choose them.

Choose related data

Choose related data

4  - Select the "Column Chart" or "Bar Chart" option from the list of chart types under the "Insert" menu.

Insert a chart

Insert a chart

5  - Customize the chart according to your needs.

Customize your chart

Customize your chart

6  - Save the chart and use it in your report.

Use it in your survey report

Use it in your survey report

Custom data visualization tools

Data visualization displays data visually, such as graphs and charts. This makes it easier for individuals to draw conclusions from data and make data-driven decisions. You can create your survey report graph using custom data visualization tools like Tableau, Klipfolio , and Qlik Sense .

The list of data visualization tools

The list of data visualization tools

  • A survey report example

The essential data should be presented in your survey report clearly and understandably so you can reach conclusions fast. Let’s imagine the survey research conducted by a perfume company was conducted from March 7 to March 16 via an online survey, which consisted of 16 questions.

A total of 150 customers participated in the survey. The survey aimed to measure product quality, customer service, and overall customer satisfaction level . Of the 150 customers surveyed, 55% rated the overall survey score as excellent, 36% as good, and only 9% as average or below.  You can review the following item created on forms.app.

  • Completion rate: The completion rate is calculated by dividing the total number of questions in your survey by the number of questions that were answered. If your survey has 16 questions and respondents answered only 8, the completion rate is 50%.
  • Total number of responses: The total number of responses is the total number of respondents you selected to participate in the survey. In our example, the total number of responses is 150.
  • Survey views: The total number of views versus the number of different people who viewed the survey, as some people may have viewed the survey more than once.
  • The date range of responses: You must provide the date range of the responses in your survey report. In the above example, the response date range is between March 7 and 16.
  • Distribution of survey respondents' responses: Survey respondents have different opinions about your products and services. In our example, 55% rated the overall survey score as excellent, 36% as good, and 9% as average or below.
  • Closed-ended question analysis: Closed-ended questions are analyzed more quickly in the survey report. The analysis process is complex in open-ended questions as the participants express their opinions directly. You can easily illustrate closed-ended questions with pie charts or bar charts. 
  • The thoughts and interpretations of the researcher/survey owner: The researcher's thoughts and comments should be included in the survey report. This reflects the survey owner’s insights.
  • Key points to take away

In conclusion, a survey report aims to impartially convey the data acquired during the survey. It does it in an easy-to-understand and aesthetically pleasing way by survey summary of all the replies gathered.

The report has a typical structure, with sections, headers, subheadings, and more. Usually, it is produced at the conclusion of a survey. To create an effective survey report, you should:  

  • Have a clean structure 
  • Use simple language  
  • And focus on the key results

Ensure the survey report is accurate and professional, giving only pertinent information. This article has explained the definition of the survey report, the statistical significance of the survey analysis report, and how to create excellent graphics for your survey report.

Sena is a content writer at forms.app. She likes to read and write articles on different topics. Sena also likes to learn about different cultures and travel. She likes to study and learn different languages. Her specialty is linguistics, surveys, survey questions, and sampling methods.

  • Form Features
  • Data Collection

Table of Contents

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  • How to Create a Survey Report in 5 Steps

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Surveys are usually created as part of a research process, which is aimed at attaining a conclusion. Hence,r to conclude  your surveys, you need to create a survey report at the end of your survey.

This describes a survey, its results, and any pattern or trends found in the survey, all to help you conclude your research.

Creating a survey report is usually the next step after you finish conducting your survey. For proper analysis, it usually follows a set-out pattern — including headings, subheadings, etc.

What is a Survey Report? 

A survey report is a document whose task is to present the information gathered during the survey in an  objective manner. It presents a summary of all the responses that were collected in a simple and visually appealing manner.

The report follows a standard organization, with different sections, headings, subheadings, etc. It is usually created at the end of a survey (i.e. after constructing and gathering responses).

Survey reports are an integral part of the research, and it is very important that you always represent accurate data in your report.

5 Steps to Creating a Survey Report

It is one thing to create a survey report, but another to create a good survey report. Therefore, we have prepared a guide to assist you in writing your next report.

Here are the 5 main steps you need to follow to create a good survey report.

Create a Questionnaire  

Every survey report requires a survey Hence, the first thing you need to do is to create a survey or questionnaire that will be used to carry out your survey.

The responses received from the questionnaire will determine the final outlook of the survey report . However, there are a few important things you need to consider before creating a questionnaire for your survey report.

Factors to Consider Before Creating a Questionnaire For a Survey Report  

  • Define your objectives

The first step to creating a good questionnaire for your survey report is defining the objectives of your research. After which you will create your questionnaire which aligns with your research objectives.

In simple terms, your research objective will guide you in choosing the kind of questionnaire that should be created. For example, if your objective is to sell your products online, then you should create an online order form.

  • Who are your audience?

After defining your objectives, the next step is to identify your target audience. Your target audience will  determine the kind of questions that would be asked in the questionnaire.

When creating a questionnaire to evaluate job seekers, for instance, the questions that will be asked in the questionnaire will be different from when creating a questionnaire for those seeking a life partner.

  • Survey Report Method (Quantitative/Qualitative)

Now that you know the research objective and target audience, the next step is to determine the method that will be used in carrying out this survey. Is it going to be quantitative or qualitative? Or both?

The interesting thing about choosing a method of carrying out your research is that this method is determined by the first two factors. For an online matchmaking questionnaire, a qualitative method will be used.

An online order form , on the other hand, will require both, but mostly quantitative methods.

  • Best Types of Questions for Surveys

Another important aspect of creating a questionnaire is determining the types of questions that will be most perfect for the survey. Is it dichotomous, close-ended questions , or rating and ranking questions ?

The type of survey questions should be carefully chosen by the questionnaire in order to collect the right data and not affect the response rate on the survey . For example, when requesting the phone number of your respondents, the question shouldn’t be closed-ended.

Collect Data  

After determining how to create a questionnaire for your survey, the next thing to do is  create the questionnaire and start collecting data . There are points to note  in data collection and some of them have been highlighted below:

  • Location of your Audience

to create a more detailed survey report, you need to identify your audience’s location when collecting data. Respondents may be reluctant to provide  their location in the questionnaire, 

Therefore, you need to create a questionnaire that automatically identifies the respondent’s location once they start filling the questionnaire. This can be done using the Formplus Geolocation feature .

  • Avoid Survey Bias

One of the best practices of collecting clean data for your questionnaire is by avoiding survey bias . There are different kinds of biases that we can face during data collection, and they all fall under response and non-response biases .

There are a lot of things you need to consider when creating your questionnaire to avoid these biases. These fall under the 4 factors we have highlighted above for you to consider when creating a questionnaire.

  • Ways to Create a Questionnaire (Paper or Online Form)

Another thing to consider when choosing a data collection method is the type of questionnaire to use. Is it better to use an online or paper form?

There are a lot of factors that should be considered when making this decision. Some of these include; your target audience, cost of implementation, efficiency, and data security.

The traditional way of data collection is through the paper questionnaire. However, if you consider the factors that were highlighted above, you will realize that it is better to use an online questionnaire .

An online questionnaire is easier to implement, more efficient, cost-effective, helps to reach a larger audience, and even offers more data security. However, if most of your target audience are in remote areas without an internet connection, or are not familiar with how to use a technological device, it is better to use paper forms or both.

Analyze Data  

Before writing a report from the data collected during your survey, you need to simplify it for better understanding. This will make it easy to write a survey report for the data collected and for other people to understand the data. 

  • Export Data

After data collection, you need to export it for data analysis. This can be done using any of the available data analysis software.

Analyzing data on Excel or Google Sheets just became easier with Formplus . With the Formplus – Google Sheets integration, the responses collected from your questionnaire will be automatically added to your Google Sheets worksheet in real-time.

You can also export the data as CSV and work on it using Microsoft Excel, Power BI, or any other data analysis software. 

Analyze and Interpret

After exporting the data, you analyze it. Data analysis involves breaking data down into simpler terms, identifying similarities, grouping and interpreting them.

There are different methods of data analysis that can be used in analyzing the data collected from your questionnaire before interpretation . However, each of these methods follows similar processes that have been highlighted below.

  • Data Cleaning

Due to some factors during the data collection process, you may have collected inaccurate or corrupt information – making the data “ dirty”. This may include duplicate records, white spaces, or outright errors. 

Things like this make the collected data irrelevant to your aim of Analysis and should be cleaned. It is the next step after data collection, so that you may arrive at a conclusion that is closer to your expected outcome.

  • Data Analysis

Once the data is collected, cleaned, and processed, it is ready for analysis. At this point, you may realize that you have the exact data you need or still need to collect more data. To make analysis easier, you might use software that will ease understating, interpretation, and conclusion. 

  • Data Interpretation

After a successful analysis, the next step is interpretation. There are different ways of interpreting the result of data analysis. It can be done using simple words (usually a summary of the result), tables, or charts.

  • Data Visualization

This is the most common process involved in data analysis and interpretation. It is the process of displaying data graphically so that it can be easier for everyone  to understand  and process it. It is often used to analyze relationships and discover trends by comparing t variables in a dataset.

Write Survey Report  

After successfully analysing and interpreting  your data, it is ready to feature in your survey report. At this stage, all you need to do is plug and play because everything you need has been prepared in the previous steps.

To further make your survey report writing process easier, it is advised that you follow a pre-designed template that is tailored to the type of survey under consideration.

Types of Survey Report

Before embarking on the report writing journey, you need to first identify the type of survey report you want to write. The type of survey report is determined by the nature of the survey that was carried out.

Some of the different kinds of surveys include employee satisfaction surveys, customer feedback surveys, market research surveys, etc. 

  • Employee Satisfaction Survey

This method is used to gauge whether employees are satisfied with the work environment. Organizations usually do this to ensure that employees are motivated and to build a stronger team spirit.

Employees are asked to give feedback and particularly voice their frustrations with the company. 

  • Customer Feedback Survey

This is undoubtedly one of the most common types of surveys. Businesses are always seen requesting feedback from customers after selling a product or rendering a service.

As an individual, you must have experienced this at a point in time. Whether after purchasing an item from a grocery store, placing an order online ordering at a restaurant, etc. 

  • Market Research Survey

It is used to discover customer needs, competitive advantage, how and where products are purchased, etc. This type of survey can be applied when no data is available yet: For example, to measure how your target audience feels about a product you intend to lunch. 

In some instances, it’s about building on past data in your market research database. When you are building on past research, you conduct a survey to measure, for example, what people think about the product, say, a year after its launch.

For each of the different types of surveys highlighted above, the structure of the survey report will be slightly different from the other.  

Features of a Survey Report/Guidelines

Although the structure of the different types of survey reports may vary slightly, there are some must-have features common to all survey types. The features of a survey report include; a title page, table of contents, executive summary, background and objectives, methodology, results, conclusion and recommendations, and appendices.

The content of the above-listed sections may, however, vary across the different types of survey reports. Asides from following a set structure, there are also guidelines for writing a good survey report.

This includes writing the executive summary and table of contents last, writing in concise, simple sentences, and polishing the report before finalizing it.

  • Use Analyzed Data and Infer Conclusion

This is the point where you implement all the research and analysis that was done in previous steps. Note that it is not  good practice to write survey reports from memory.

Rather, it should be carefully written using the facts and figures derived from analysis. This is what is used to drive a conclusion on your research, and also make recommendations.

You will notice that this follows consecutively in the survey report. That is results, the conclusion derived from results, and the recommendation after observing the conclusion. 

How to Create an Online Survey with Formplus 

Follow the following simple steps to create a ranking questionnaire using Formplus:

Step 1- Get Started for Free

  • Visit www.formpl.us on your device
  • Click on the Start Free Trial button to start creating surveys for free
  • Register using your email address or Google account in just 2 seconds.

online-survey-form-builder

Step 2- Start Creating Surveys

You can create a Formplus survey in one of the following ways:

Use an Existing Template

Get a head start by using a template designed by a team of market research experts. To do this, go to Templates and choose from any of the available templates.

Start From Scratch

To create a new survey from scratch on Formplus, go to your  Dashboard, then click on the Create new form button. 

Alternatively, go to the top menu, then click on the Create Form button.

how to write a survey report brainly

Step 3 – Add Form Fields

The next step is to add questions so you can collect data from your survey. You can do this by going to the left sidebar in the form builder, then choose from any of the available 30+ form fields. 

You can simply click or drag and drop the form field into the blank space to preview your progress as you create the survey. Each form field included in your form can be further edited by clicking on the Edit icon.

Once you have edited the form fields to your taste, you should click on the Save button in the top right corner of the form builder.

Step 4  – Beautify Your Survey 

After adding the required form field to your survey, the next step is to make it attractive to respondents. Formplus has some built-in customization features that can be used to create a beautiful survey

This option allows you to add colours, fonts, images, backgrounds, etc. There is also a custom built-in CSS feature that gives you more design flexibility.

You even get to preview the survey in real-time as you make further customization.

Step 5  – Share and Start Collecting Responses

Formplus offers various sharing options to choose from. This includes sharing via email, customized links, social media, etc.

You can send personalized email invites to respondents with prefilled respondent details to avoid entry of incorrect data. With prefilled surveys, personal details like respondent’s name, email address, and phone number will be pre-populated.

how to write a survey report brainly

Conclusion 

Survey reports show the results of a research survey and make recommendations based on a careful analysis of these results. They summarize the result of your research in a manner that can be easily understood and interpreted by a layman or third party, who was not involved in the research process. 

A good survey report follows a well thought out systematic arrangement that smoothly drives you from a wide summary down to your specific recommendations. How  it is being written is what determines how it is seen or understood by other people.

The key to writing a good survey is by mastering the art of using simple words to summarize the results of your research. It should also be created using beautiful designs to encourage readers.

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How to Write a Survey Report

Learn how to write a survey report with these essential tips.

In this post

  • 1 . Understanding Survey Reports: A Comprehensive Guide
  • 2 . Analysing Survey Data: Tips and Tricks
  • 3 . Conclusion

Running a survey is an excellent way to gather information about your target audience and gain insights into their needs, preferences, and behaviours. However, it's not enough to just conduct a survey; you must also know how to interpret and present the results effectively. In this article, we will take you through ten essential steps for writing a comprehensive survey report that provides valuable insights and helps you make informed business decisions. Let's dive in!

Understanding Survey Reports: A Comprehensive Guide

Before we get into the nitty-gritty of report writing, it's crucial to understand what survey reports are, why they're important, and what they should contain. A survey report is a comprehensive summary of the data and insights gathered from a survey. It provides an in-depth analysis of the survey results, including key metrics, trends, patterns, and recommendations for action.

Survey reports are essential for businesses and organizations that want to understand their audience's opinions, behaviours, and preferences. They can help identify areas for improvement, measure customer satisfaction, and inform decision-making. Without survey reports, businesses may miss out on critical insights that could impact their success.

Key Metrics to Look for in a Survey Report

When analyzing survey results, it's essential to identify the key metrics that reveal the most valuable insights. Some of the critical metrics to look for include:

  • Response rate: This metric indicates the percentage of people who responded to the survey. A high response rate is generally desirable, as it means that the results are more representative of the target audience.
  • Average time to complete the survey: This metric provides insight into how long it took respondents to complete the survey. A longer completion time may indicate that the survey was too long or confusing.
  • Distribution of responses by question and answer: This metric shows how respondents answered each question and can help identify patterns and trends.
  • Net promoter score (NPS): This metric measures how likely respondents are to recommend a product or service to others. A high NPS is generally desirable, as it indicates that respondents are satisfied and willing to promote the business.
  • Customer satisfaction score (CSAT): This metric measures how satisfied respondents are with a product or service. A high CSAT is generally desirable, as it indicates that respondents are happy with the business.
  • Conversion rate: This metric measures how many respondents took a desired action, such as making a purchase or signing up for a newsletter. A high conversion rate is generally desirable, as it indicates that respondents are engaged and interested in the business.

By focusing on these metrics, you can gain a better understanding of your audience's opinions, behaviors, and preferences, and how they relate to your business goals.

How to Interpret Survey Results

Interpreting survey results is where the fun begins! It allows you to draw insights and trends from the data and use them to make informed decisions. Here are a few tips for interpreting survey results:

  • Look for patterns and trends across multiple questions or groups. By examining the data in different ways, you can identify insights that may not be immediately apparent.
  • Compare the responses of different segments of respondents, such as age or gender groups. This can help identify differences in opinions or behaviors that may be relevant to your business.
  • Focus on the responses to open-ended questions, where respondents can provide more detailed feedback. This can provide valuable insights into the reasons behind respondents' opinions and behaviors.
  • Look for outliers or unexpected responses that may indicate an issue or opportunity. These responses can provide valuable insights into areas that may need further investigation or improvement.

By following these tips, you can turn raw survey data into insights that are actionable and meaningful for your business.

Best Practices for Presenting Survey Data

Now that you have analysed and interpreted your survey results, it's time to present them in a way that effectively communicates the insights to your audience. Here are some best practices for presenting survey data:

  • Use charts and graphs to visualise the data and make it easier to understand. This can help identify patterns and trends more easily than raw data.
  • Keep the design and layout clean and simple. A cluttered or confusing report can make it difficult for readers to understand the insights.
  • Include a summary of the key findings at the beginning of the report. This can help readers quickly understand the most important insights.
  • Make sure that the report is easy to navigate by using clear headings and subheadings. This can help readers find the information they need more easily.
  • Provide context by explaining the survey methodology, objectives, and limitations. This can help readers understand the survey's purpose and how the insights should be interpreted.

By following these best practices, you can ensure that your survey report is engaging and informative, and that the insights are communicated effectively.

Analysing Survey Data: Tips and Tricks

Once you have gathered the survey data, the next step is to analyze it in a way that provides meaningful insights. Here are some tips and tricks for analyzing survey data effectively:

Identifying Trends and Patterns in Survey Responses

When analyzing survey data, it's crucial to identify trends and patterns in the responses. This can help you understand how your audience thinks and behaves, and what factors influence their decisions. You can use tools like Excel or Google Sheets to create charts and graphs that visualise the data and make it easier to identify trends.

Using Survey Data to Make Informed Business Decisions

The ultimate goal of conducting a survey is to gather insights that can inform your business decisions. By analyzing the survey data and identifying trends and patterns, you can make informed decisions about product development, marketing strategies, and customer service initiatives, among other things.

Writing a comprehensive survey report is a vital step in gaining insights into your target audience and making informed business decisions. By following the ten steps outlined in this article, you can create a survey report that provides meaningful insights, communicates them effectively, and drives action. Use these tips and tricks to create a killer survey report and take your business to the next level!

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  • Knowledge Base
  • Methodology
  • Doing Survey Research | A Step-by-Step Guide & Examples

Doing Survey Research | A Step-by-Step Guide & Examples

Published on 6 May 2022 by Shona McCombes . Revised on 10 October 2022.

Survey research means collecting information about a group of people by asking them questions and analysing the results. To conduct an effective survey, follow these six steps:

  • Determine who will participate in the survey
  • Decide the type of survey (mail, online, or in-person)
  • Design the survey questions and layout
  • Distribute the survey
  • Analyse the responses
  • Write up the results

Surveys are a flexible method of data collection that can be used in many different types of research .

Table of contents

What are surveys used for, step 1: define the population and sample, step 2: decide on the type of survey, step 3: design the survey questions, step 4: distribute the survey and collect responses, step 5: analyse the survey results, step 6: write up the survey results, frequently asked questions about surveys.

Surveys are used as a method of gathering data in many different fields. They are a good choice when you want to find out about the characteristics, preferences, opinions, or beliefs of a group of people.

Common uses of survey research include:

  • Social research: Investigating the experiences and characteristics of different social groups
  • Market research: Finding out what customers think about products, services, and companies
  • Health research: Collecting data from patients about symptoms and treatments
  • Politics: Measuring public opinion about parties and policies
  • Psychology: Researching personality traits, preferences, and behaviours

Surveys can be used in both cross-sectional studies , where you collect data just once, and longitudinal studies , where you survey the same sample several times over an extended period.

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Before you start conducting survey research, you should already have a clear research question that defines what you want to find out. Based on this question, you need to determine exactly who you will target to participate in the survey.

Populations

The target population is the specific group of people that you want to find out about. This group can be very broad or relatively narrow. For example:

  • The population of Brazil
  • University students in the UK
  • Second-generation immigrants in the Netherlands
  • Customers of a specific company aged 18 to 24
  • British transgender women over the age of 50

Your survey should aim to produce results that can be generalised to the whole population. That means you need to carefully define exactly who you want to draw conclusions about.

It’s rarely possible to survey the entire population of your research – it would be very difficult to get a response from every person in Brazil or every university student in the UK. Instead, you will usually survey a sample from the population.

The sample size depends on how big the population is. You can use an online sample calculator to work out how many responses you need.

There are many sampling methods that allow you to generalise to broad populations. In general, though, the sample should aim to be representative of the population as a whole. The larger and more representative your sample, the more valid your conclusions.

There are two main types of survey:

  • A questionnaire , where a list of questions is distributed by post, online, or in person, and respondents fill it out themselves
  • An interview , where the researcher asks a set of questions by phone or in person and records the responses

Which type you choose depends on the sample size and location, as well as the focus of the research.

Questionnaires

Sending out a paper survey by post is a common method of gathering demographic information (for example, in a government census of the population).

  • You can easily access a large sample.
  • You have some control over who is included in the sample (e.g., residents of a specific region).
  • The response rate is often low.

Online surveys are a popular choice for students doing dissertation research , due to the low cost and flexibility of this method. There are many online tools available for constructing surveys, such as SurveyMonkey and Google Forms .

  • You can quickly access a large sample without constraints on time or location.
  • The data is easy to process and analyse.
  • The anonymity and accessibility of online surveys mean you have less control over who responds.

If your research focuses on a specific location, you can distribute a written questionnaire to be completed by respondents on the spot. For example, you could approach the customers of a shopping centre or ask all students to complete a questionnaire at the end of a class.

  • You can screen respondents to make sure only people in the target population are included in the sample.
  • You can collect time- and location-specific data (e.g., the opinions of a shop’s weekday customers).
  • The sample size will be smaller, so this method is less suitable for collecting data on broad populations.

Oral interviews are a useful method for smaller sample sizes. They allow you to gather more in-depth information on people’s opinions and preferences. You can conduct interviews by phone or in person.

  • You have personal contact with respondents, so you know exactly who will be included in the sample in advance.
  • You can clarify questions and ask for follow-up information when necessary.
  • The lack of anonymity may cause respondents to answer less honestly, and there is more risk of researcher bias.

Like questionnaires, interviews can be used to collect quantitative data : the researcher records each response as a category or rating and statistically analyses the results. But they are more commonly used to collect qualitative data : the interviewees’ full responses are transcribed and analysed individually to gain a richer understanding of their opinions and feelings.

Next, you need to decide which questions you will ask and how you will ask them. It’s important to consider:

  • The type of questions
  • The content of the questions
  • The phrasing of the questions
  • The ordering and layout of the survey

Open-ended vs closed-ended questions

There are two main forms of survey questions: open-ended and closed-ended. Many surveys use a combination of both.

Closed-ended questions give the respondent a predetermined set of answers to choose from. A closed-ended question can include:

  • A binary answer (e.g., yes/no or agree/disagree )
  • A scale (e.g., a Likert scale with five points ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree )
  • A list of options with a single answer possible (e.g., age categories)
  • A list of options with multiple answers possible (e.g., leisure interests)

Closed-ended questions are best for quantitative research . They provide you with numerical data that can be statistically analysed to find patterns, trends, and correlations .

Open-ended questions are best for qualitative research. This type of question has no predetermined answers to choose from. Instead, the respondent answers in their own words.

Open questions are most common in interviews, but you can also use them in questionnaires. They are often useful as follow-up questions to ask for more detailed explanations of responses to the closed questions.

The content of the survey questions

To ensure the validity and reliability of your results, you need to carefully consider each question in the survey. All questions should be narrowly focused with enough context for the respondent to answer accurately. Avoid questions that are not directly relevant to the survey’s purpose.

When constructing closed-ended questions, ensure that the options cover all possibilities. If you include a list of options that isn’t exhaustive, you can add an ‘other’ field.

Phrasing the survey questions

In terms of language, the survey questions should be as clear and precise as possible. Tailor the questions to your target population, keeping in mind their level of knowledge of the topic.

Use language that respondents will easily understand, and avoid words with vague or ambiguous meanings. Make sure your questions are phrased neutrally, with no bias towards one answer or another.

Ordering the survey questions

The questions should be arranged in a logical order. Start with easy, non-sensitive, closed-ended questions that will encourage the respondent to continue.

If the survey covers several different topics or themes, group together related questions. You can divide a questionnaire into sections to help respondents understand what is being asked in each part.

If a question refers back to or depends on the answer to a previous question, they should be placed directly next to one another.

Before you start, create a clear plan for where, when, how, and with whom you will conduct the survey. Determine in advance how many responses you require and how you will gain access to the sample.

When you are satisfied that you have created a strong research design suitable for answering your research questions, you can conduct the survey through your method of choice – by post, online, or in person.

There are many methods of analysing the results of your survey. First you have to process the data, usually with the help of a computer program to sort all the responses. You should also cleanse the data by removing incomplete or incorrectly completed responses.

If you asked open-ended questions, you will have to code the responses by assigning labels to each response and organising them into categories or themes. You can also use more qualitative methods, such as thematic analysis , which is especially suitable for analysing interviews.

Statistical analysis is usually conducted using programs like SPSS or Stata. The same set of survey data can be subject to many analyses.

Finally, when you have collected and analysed all the necessary data, you will write it up as part of your thesis, dissertation , or research paper .

In the methodology section, you describe exactly how you conducted the survey. You should explain the types of questions you used, the sampling method, when and where the survey took place, and the response rate. You can include the full questionnaire as an appendix and refer to it in the text if relevant.

Then introduce the analysis by describing how you prepared the data and the statistical methods you used to analyse it. In the results section, you summarise the key results from your analysis.

A Likert scale is a rating scale that quantitatively assesses opinions, attitudes, or behaviours. It is made up of four or more questions that measure a single attitude or trait when response scores are combined.

To use a Likert scale in a survey , you present participants with Likert-type questions or statements, and a continuum of items, usually with five or seven possible responses, to capture their degree of agreement.

Individual Likert-type questions are generally considered ordinal data , because the items have clear rank order, but don’t have an even distribution.

Overall Likert scale scores are sometimes treated as interval data. These scores are considered to have directionality and even spacing between them.

The type of data determines what statistical tests you should use to analyse your data.

A questionnaire is a data collection tool or instrument, while a survey is an overarching research method that involves collecting and analysing data from people using questionnaires.

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Opinion Stage » survey » How to Make a Survey

How to Conduct a Survey in 5 Simple Steps

Online surveys are a great way for you to really get to know your audience and reach useful insights. They can also be a meaningful experience for respondents. After all, when someone sends you a survey, they’re essentially telling you that your opinion matters, that you matter.

This article will teach you how to make a survey that is both effective and enjoyable. It will also give you the  survey maker , tools, and knowledge you need to do it easily.

These are the five steps we’re going to take together:

Step 1:  Make a plan

Step 2:  Build your survey

Step 3:  Test and iterate

Step 4:  Share your survey

Step 5:  Present the results

But before we get to  the how  let’s take a quick look at  the what  and  the why .

A Quick and Simple Definition of a Survey

So, a survey is a question-based research method used for collecting data from a predefined group of people. Sounds dry and academic, but it’s not! In fact, if built correctly, a survey can be a profound and enjoyable conversation with your target audience.

There are many  different types of surveys , satisfaction surveys, feedback surveys, and market research surveys, just to name a few. But they all have the same building blocks: questions that are designed to retrieve unbiased data, so that you, the surveyor, can collect this data, analyze it, and learn from the results.

Surveys can be conducted as personal interviews, or they can be sent to participants to fill out independently.  In this article, we will focus on online surveys – a world of endless possibilities and opportunities.

Try this survey

Collect valuable data.

Surveys give you access to direct and specific information from people who matter to you. As such, they can tell you a lot about what you are doing right, what you need to improve, and where you need to focus your attention.

Learn About Your Audience

Surveys teach you about your audience .  They show you who they are, what makes them tick, and how they see the slice of the world that is relevant to you.

Create Unique Content

Surveys provide unique and valuable material for rich content. In fact, in many cases, the results can be as fascinating to your audience as they are to you.

Build Strong Relationships

Whether you aim to generate leads, raise awareness, or simply retrieve data, once the survey is done, you and your audience have gone through something together. After all, you’ve shown interest in them and they’ve gotten involved – you can build on that.

Building a good survey is a process. So, here’s a step-by-step guide that will help you do it right:

Step 1: Make a Plan

Set your goal.

Define your motivation. In other words, what inspired you to conduct a survey? And what do you want to know and why? The answers to these questions will influence what you ask, who you ask, and how you ask it.

Define Your Target Audience

Who are the people you want to hear from? And what do you already know about them? Find out everything you can: where they hang out online and when, what interests them, which causes are closest to their hearts, and what cultural references could be relevant to them. This will influence your tone of voice, design, sharing strategy, and incentive plan.

Figure Out Your Sample Size

The sample size is the number of people who need to answer your survey in order for the results to be meaningful. In other words, how many members of your target audience do you need to reach to be sure your survey results accurately represent your entire audience?

  • Population size –   how many people belong to the group you want to learn about? For example, if your target audience is 40-44-year-olds in the US, your population size would be roughly 20 million.
  • Confidence level – how many times would you get the same answers if you conducted your survey multiple times? The most commonly used confidence level is 95%. It’s also the industry standard.
  • Margin of error – how different will the results you get be from the results you would get from your entire audience? Up to a certain point, your margin of error will shrink as your sample group grows. For instance, if you’re surveying around 50 people, your margin of error will be about 14%, but if you have 1000 respondents, your margin of error will be roughly 3%.

Here’s a  calculator you can use  to determine your ideal sample size.

Find the Right Time

When is the right time to launch your survey and for how long should it run? Well, once you know who your audience is, and how many of them you need to reach, you can determine the timing quite easily. You should also consider the context of your survey. For example, if it’s about Christmas gifts, your response rate will be higher during the holiday season.

Step 2: Build Your Survey

Now that you have a clear picture of your goals and audience you can start building your survey. There are many different  types of survey questions  one can ask: open-ended questions, multiple-choice questions, yes/no questions, rating scale questions, and more. Different questions suit different topics, needs, and audiences. Following are a few tips to keep in mind:

Short surveys have a greater chance of being completed. So, ask only what you really need to know.

Confusion leads to frustration, which leads to drop-offs.   So, keep your questions short, simple, and clear. Additionally, build your survey gradually, starting with the easiest questions and building up to the more complex ones.

People will stay with you if they’re having fun. So, consider your audience’s convenience and be friendly. You can also make your survey beautiful by using cool and relevant images and color schemes. We’ve created dozens of  survey templates  that can help you get started.

Be Respectful

If built correctly, a survey can feel like a personal conversation. So, use skip logic to direct respondents through different question paths based on their answers. In addition, make sure you’re not asking any redundant questions, and that there are no gaps or overlaps in your structure. It’s worth the effort.

If it makes sense in the context of your survey, take your relationship with your audience to the next level by adding a  lead generation form .

Build an online survey in minutes

Step 3: Test and Iterate

Once you’ve built your survey, you may want to test it on a small sample of your target audience. You can use our visual analytics dashboard to see what works and what doesn’t. This will give you an opportunity to make some improvements before launching.

You could, for example, check how many people opened it, where they dropped off, and how long the process took them. As a result, you may find there are questions that could be made clearer or shorter. Ask yourself whether there is anything you should leave out, if you should add some images, or rearrange the order.

Step 4: Share Your Survey

Now that your survey is ready, it’s time to share it. At this point, you should remind yourself who you’re dealing with. To do so, go back to your goals, sample size, and most importantly your target audience. Where would you have the greatest chances of getting their attention?

The options are endless. For example, you can make it a  landing page survey , a  Facebook survey , or a  WhatsApp survey , share a link to it on social media, invite people to your personal survey page on our site, or embed the survey on your website.

The fact that you can receive live updates makes it easy to follow the response rate because you can see early on if your sharing strategy is working. If not, don’t panic, just try a new channel or a different time. You’ll figure it out eventually.

You may want to incentivize your audience to participate in the survey. In some cases, your mere interest in their opinion is enough of an incentive. But sometimes, offering a giveaway or the opportunity to participate in a prize-bearing competition can go a long way.

You could also promise to share the results and conclusions with your respondents before you make them public. Be creative, just make sure that the incentive doesn’t create bias. That would be counterproductive…

Step 5: Present the Results

You’ve done it! You know how to conduct a survey. Your questions are out there and people are responding. At this point, you’ve probably clicked the refresh button on your survey dashboard a hundred times, getting a rush of adrenalin whenever an answer comes in.

Once you reach your full sample group – and you will – it’s time to put on your investigator’s cap and look at the data you have collected:

Check Your Goals

Go back to your goals and motivations in order to recall why you decided to ask what you asked.

Examine the Data

Analyze your visual dashboard for different perspectives on the results. As you’ll see, there are loads of visualizations there to learn from.

Reach Insights

What have you learned from your survey? Do you have any new questions to ask or action items to implement? Formulate your conclusions based on the data, and apply or report them internally.

Get Creative

You can tell so many captivating stories with data. Use your insights and data visualizations to create rich, original, and useful content based on the results.

Every End Is Also a Beginning

Now that you have successfully concluded your survey you can start on an even more challenging and fascinating journey – implementing all the insights you have collected.

Popular Resources

Create your own online survey

IMAGES

  1. How to write a survey report report

    how to write a survey report brainly

  2. How to write a survey questionnaire. Below is an example.

    how to write a survey report brainly

  3. How To Write A Survey Report

    how to write a survey report brainly

  4. How to Build a Survey Results Report in 5 Simple Steps

    how to write a survey report brainly

  5. How To Write A Survey Report

    how to write a survey report brainly

  6. HOW TO WRITE A SURVEY REPORT

    how to write a survey report brainly

VIDEO

  1. Report writing

  2. What do you answer?Write in the comments column! #quiz #shorts #survey

  3. Report Writing

  4. How to Perform Literature Review Using AI Tool?

  5. Survey Report

  6. how to write Survey report of community

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Survey Report (with Pictures)

    2. Write a 1-2 page executive summary paraphrasing the report. This comes at the very beginning of the report, after the table of contents. An executive summary condenses the main points of the report into a few pages. It should include: Methodology of the survey.

  2. How to Make a Survey Report: Complete Guide

    Present the key findings of the survey in a clear and organized manner. Use charts, graphs, and tables to visualize the data effectively. Ensure that the findings are presented in a logical sequence, making it easy for readers to follow the narrative. The survey findings section is the heart of the report, where the raw data collected during ...

  3. How to write a survey report?

    A survey report is a document that presents the results of a survey. It should be written in a clear and concise way that is easy to understand. The report should include the following sections: Introduction: The introduction should state the purpose of the survey and the target population. It should also provide a brief overview of the results ...

  4. How to Write a Complete Survey Report

    Completion rate. The completion rate is the number of questions answered divided by the total number of questions in your survey. If you have a survey of 12 questions but most respondents only answered 6 of those, you have a completion rate of 50%. Depending on the survey tool you use, the completion rate can indicate many things.

  5. How to write a survey report

    Tips for an effective survey report. Here are a few best practices for creating a quality survey report: Start with an introduction. Set the tone by explaining the purpose of the survey. Provide context for the information you're presenting. Use visualizations. Images and graphs are an effective way to tell a story.

  6. Survey Results: How To Analyze Data and Report on Findings

    Choose your chart types: The first step is to select the right chart type for your data based on the type of question asked. No one chart fits all types of data. Choose a chart that clearly displays each of your data points ' stories in the most appropriate way. Column/bar graphs: Great for comparing categories.

  7. How to Create a Survey Results Report (+7 Examples to Steal)

    A great report will increase the impact of your survey results and encourage more readers to engage with the content. Create Your Survey Now. In This Article. 1. Use Data Visualization. 2. Write the Key Facts First. 3. Write a Short Survey Summary.

  8. An ultimate guide to survey report: Best practices & tools

    Here are the guidelines to remember while building a survey report: Make an introduction: At the start of the report, specify what the main aim of this survey was when you were starting off. Explaining the survey's purpose will help establish the mood. Give the facts you are delivering context.

  9. How to Create a Survey Report in 5 Steps

    Step 4 - Beautify Your Survey. After adding the required form field to your survey, the next step is to make it attractive to respondents. Formplus has some built-in customization features that can be used to create a beautiful survey. This option allows you to add colours, fonts, images, backgrounds, etc.

  10. 10 Steps to Writing a Comprehensive Survey Report

    2. Analysing Survey Data: Tips and Tricks. 3. Conclusion. Running a survey is an excellent way to gather information about your target audience and gain insights into their needs, preferences, and behaviours. However, it's not enough to just conduct a survey; you must also know how to interpret and present the results effectively.

  11. How to write survey report?

    The criteria retailer must meet to receive a reduced penalty and/or protect the license/permit if an illegal alcohol sale takes place at the establishment is often referred to

  12. How to conduct a survey

    Steps to conduct a survey. 1. Ask yourself why you want to send it. The first thing you should do before writing a survey is to figure out why you're sending it out at all. What type of insights are you looking for and what would help you validate your decisions.

  13. Doing Survey Research

    Survey research means collecting information about a group of people by asking them questions and analysing the results. To conduct an effective survey, follow these six steps: Determine who will participate in the survey. Decide the type of survey (mail, online, or in-person) Design the survey questions and layout. Distribute the survey.

  14. How to Conduct a Survey? A Step-by-Step Guide

    These are the five steps we're going to take together: Step 1: Make a plan. Step 2: Build your survey. Step 3: Test and iterate. Step 4: Share your survey. Step 5: Present the results. But before we get to the how let's take a quick look at the what and the why.

  15. How to Write a Literature Review

    Examples of literature reviews. Step 1 - Search for relevant literature. Step 2 - Evaluate and select sources. Step 3 - Identify themes, debates, and gaps. Step 4 - Outline your literature review's structure. Step 5 - Write your literature review.

  16. Questionnaire Design

    Questionnaires vs. surveys. A survey is a research method where you collect and analyze data from a group of people. A questionnaire is a specific tool or instrument for collecting the data.. Designing a questionnaire means creating valid and reliable questions that address your research objectives, placing them in a useful order, and selecting an appropriate method for administration.

  17. what is the purpose of a survey report?

    The purpose of writing a survey report is to study a research topic thoroughly, and to summarize the existing studies in an organized manner. It is an important step in any research project. Also so you can evaluate it and get feedback from other people. And you can so you can collect data based of the survey report. Hope this help.

  18. How can we write a survey report

    9 people found it helpful. Pallavi441. report flag outlined. while writing a servey we should keep the following points in mind : 1)introduction to the survey. 2)write about it each question inturn. 3) cross tabulate relevant pair of questions. 4) write the conclusion. Hope this will help you !

  19. Writing a Research Paper Conclusion

    Step 1: Restate the problem. The first task of your conclusion is to remind the reader of your research problem. You will have discussed this problem in depth throughout the body, but now the point is to zoom back out from the details to the bigger picture. While you are restating a problem you've already introduced, you should avoid phrasing ...

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    Get personalized homework help for free — for real. Join for free. Brainly is the knowledge-sharing community where hundreds of millions of students and experts put their heads together to crack their toughest homework questions.

  21. how to write a report

    report flag outlined. Look into the subject you're writing a report about about and take notes. Go through what you're reporting and explain it and since you didn't say what you want to write about I can't really say much more than just go over it once you wrote it and make some corrections and thanks now I finished the tutorial thingy.

  22. How to Write a Reflection Paper in 5 Steps (plus Template and Sample

    Use these 5 tips to write a thoughtful and insightful reflection paper. 1. Answer key questions. To write a reflection paper, you need to be able to observe your own thoughts and reactions to the material you've been given. A good way to start is by answering a series of key questions. For example: