How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internal Position

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What is a cover letter for an internal position?

  • How to create a cover letter for an in-house position
  • Cover letter for an internal position template
  • Cover letter for an internal promotion example

When applying for an internal job at your current company, you should create a cover letter to accompany your resume. A cover letter distinguishes you as a strong candidate for a promotion. It should outline your experience, qualifications and interest in the new role. In this article, you’ll learn how to write a cover letter for an internal position and provide a template and an example to help you write your own.

A cover letter for an internal position is a written statement that accompanies your application for a new role within your current organization. Similar to a standard cover letter, this type of message should discuss your professional accomplishments and your work experience to establish you as a strong candidate for the promotion.

How to create a cover letter for an internal position

Follow these steps to create a cover letter for an internal position:

1. Follow a standard cover letter length

Cover letters should average 250-350 words that span three to four paragraphs. If you submit a paper application, ensure that your cover letter is less than a page long using 12-point font. A shorter cover letter may not take full advantage of the potential that this introductory message offers, while a longer letter may need a more simplified narrative.

2. Begin the cover letter with the most important information

Start your cover letter by listing your contact information. State the date that you are submitting your application, and then list your company’s contact information, including the hiring manager’s name. Use a professional salutation like “Dear” before writing the body of the letter.

3. Write about your experience as a story or narrative for the hiring manager

Discuss your previous professional experience and the new skills and qualifications you developed in your current role. Even if you are already familiar with the hiring manager or you have discussed your experience in your initial interview, include this information in your cover letter as a reminder and to show your serious interest in the position as well as your readiness. Incorporate these elements into a narrative that explains why you are qualified for the promotion and how your experience will enable you to contribute in a unique way. 

4. Discuss how you have improved your qualifications and skills in your current role

Use examples to discuss how you have learned and advanced in your current role. Consider mentioning training programs you have completed, certifications you have earned or objectives you have achieved. Mentioning the ways you have improved allows you to position yourself as an employee who can continually impact the company in a positive way.

5. Mention specific contributions and accomplishments you’ve made in your current role

Add data and figures to quantify the contributions you have made to the company. Consider mentioning additional revenue you generated or cost-saving initiatives you established. Adding these specifics helps the hiring team understand the value you have added to the company and assess what you could provide in the new role.

6. Thank the hiring manager for considering your application

Conclude your cover letter by thanking the hiring manager for their consideration. Prompt them to take the next step in the process, which may be interviewing you or having a formal discussion about the job opening. Finish the letter with a formal closing like “Sincerely” before adding your signature.

Internal position cover letter template

Use this internal position cover letter template to write your cover letter:

Your Name Your Address | Your City, State, and ZIP Code | Your Phone Number | Your Email Address

Today’s Date

Hiring Manager’s Name Business Name Business Address Business City, State, and ZIP Code

Salutation,

The first paragraph should begin with a statement of your interest in the open position. Briefly summarize your career goals and unique qualifications.

The second paragraph should discuss your qualifications for the job opening. Mention accomplishments and specific figures and data when possible.

The third paragraph should expand on areas where you have improved since joining the company. Connect your achievements and skills to the job opening.

The final paragraph should include a reminder of your interest and a prompt to take the next step in the hiring process. End by expressing gratitude.

Formal Closing, Your Signature

Internal position cover letter example

Consider this cover letter a model for how to tell the story of your qualifications, goals and contributions. Use this example to help you write your cover letter for an internal position:

Hannah Lee 123 Main Way | New York, NY 11110 | 555-555-5555 | [email protected]

July 1, 2019

Pat Smith ABC Business 123 Business Pkwy New York, NY 11101

Dear Ms. Smith,

I am writing to apply formally for the Assistant Sales Manager position in the Sales and Marketing department. I was excited to learn about this newly created role, as I am eager to apply my leadership skills and extensive experience to a management role within the company.

When I joined ABC Business three years ago as an Account Coordinator, I brought five years of experience in the sales field. Since then, I have gained experience managing sales teams and devising strategies, even leading my current team to exceed our quarterly goal by 15%. My initiatives have also increased team-wide efficiency by 10%, further adding to increased revenue for the sales department.

In my three years in this Account Coordinator position, I have developed strong communication, problem-solving and management skills. I believe these skills, combined with my past experience and deep knowledge of the company, would allow me to contribute substantially to the Assistant Sales Manager role and the sales department’s objectives.

I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss this Assistant Sales Manager position with you in person. Thank you in advance for your consideration, and I look forward to talking with you further.

Sincerely, Hannah Lee

internal manager cover letter

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How to Write an Effective Internal Position Cover Letter and Resume

You have probably spent years working for your organization. You deliver outstanding results, meet company goals, and now you feel it’s time to advance into a different department or ask for a promotion. But how do you go about it? It’s easy to assume that you don’t need to submit an internal position cover letter and resume because your track record already speaks volumes.

However, that isn’t always the case. Whether you’re seeking a promotion or applying for a new departmental position, you must submit a cover letter and an internal position resume. Usually, this application centers on your current role and convinces the hiring manager and managerial staff that you are ready for the position. 

Find your bootcamp match

Keep reading to learn several tips and tricks that will guide you in writing a successful internal position cover letter and resume.

Internal Position Cover Letter Guide

Writing a cover letter for an internal position shouldn’t be as challenging because you already know the company dynamics. You only need to express your interest in the job and explain how you intend to transition into the new role. You can list a few of the significant achievements you have accomplished in your current role.

Why Does Your Internal Position Cover Letter Matter?

An internal cover letter is important because it positions you as a strong candidate for the role. Not every department manager knows your achievements and skills. Writing a cover letter to accompany your resume captures the hiring manager’s attention, giving you an upper hand.

Most people who apply for internal positions are highly qualified and deserving. A cover letter allows you to vouch for yourself and explain why you are the right pick for the job. You can showcase your contribution to the company and explain how your current role shaped you for the new position.

Essential Components of Your Internal Position Cover Letter

Internal position cover letters follow the same cover letter format as universal cover letters . However, the letter’s contents will focus more on your current position and not previous job opportunities. Here are the most significant components of an internal position cover letter.

  • Contact information. You will include your contact information and the company’s information. In addition, you will add the date of your application. Your information allows the recruiters to give you feedback and the date proves that you submitted your application before the deadline.
  • Salutation. You will address the letter to the hiring manager using their name. Luckily, because it is an internal job posting, you can find the hiring manager’s name. Using the official name makes the letter more personable and captures attention.
  • Two or three body paragraphs. Start by expressing interest in the open position and highlighting your qualifications. The next paragraph covers how your capabilities align with the job opening. Include hard data to prove your achievements at the company. Finally, explain how you have grown in your current position and how your skills will contribute to your success in the new role.
  • Conclusion. This paragraph concludes the letter by expressing gratitude to the hiring manager and prompting them to consider you for the next step of the hiring process. It should be about two to three sentences in length and conclude with a handwritten signature and formal closing, such as “kind regards” or “sincerely.”

5 Tips for Writing a Strong Internal Position Cover Letter

There are hundreds of tips when it comes to writing cover letters. However, writing an internal position cover letter requires more attention and knowledge of the company culture and products. Here are the five top tips to implement in your cover letter.

  • Be professional. You may be a seasoned employee, but that doesn’t mean you can rely on your relationships at the company to get ahead. Don’t randomly throw in your boss’s name unless you’re using them for a recommendation. Write a formal letter like you would for an external position.
  • Use insider knowledge. As an employee, you already know about the organization. Tailor your achievements to match what the company is looking for in a candidate. Highlight specific contributions and explain why they make you the right fit for the job opening. You can use figures and measurable outcomes to emphasize your point.
  • Keep it short. Cover letters should be brief and to the point. Typically, your cover letter should be around 250-350 words, which is under one page. Only focus on meaningful information to make your cover letter captivating. Your resume will contain additional information.
  • Speak highly of your boss. Always show gratitude and explain that your boss played a crucial role in preparing you for the new position. Keep in mind, the chances of the hiring managers reaching out to your boss for confirmation on your work are very high.
  • Proofread your work. Don’t ever submit your job application before proofreading. Proofreading helps you correct grammatical errors and edit out unnecessary information. Your hiring manager will appreciate a well-crafted cover letter.

Internal Position Cover Letter Example

Now that you’re aware of the components and tips for writing a professional cover letter, you can go ahead and draft a few examples. But if you also need a practical example, here is a sample cover letter for an internal position.

Internal Position Cover Letter Sample

123 Street St., New York, NY

(123) 456 7890

[email protected]

November 20, 2021

Madeleine Woods

XYZ Creatives

321 Manhattan, New York

Dear Ms. Woods,

I am writing to formally express my interest in the Digital Marketing Manager position in the Sales and Marketing Department. I was ecstatic to learn about the role as it allowed me to showcase my leadership skills and long-term experience in digital marketing. I am currently working in the same department as an assistant sales manager.

When I joined XYZ Creatives in 2017 as a Sales Associate, my goal was to learn and contribute to the department and organization at large. Since then, I have gained extensive experience in online sales, digital marketing, and management. I have also risen to become an assistant sales manager, working under the most supportive department head.

My digital marketing expertise led to a 32 percent client growth and improved client satisfaction ratings. In addition, I joined a digital marketing bootcamp in 2020 to learn about analytical marketing skills, digital marketing tools, improving client loyalty online and in person, and more. I can use my knowledge and experience in the sales department to ensure client satisfaction and lay a firm foundation for the long-term success of digital marketing campaigns at XYZ Creatives.

I have attached my resume, which features all my notable achievements and skills. I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss further the Digital Marketing Manager position and how to move XYZ Creatives forward. I appreciate your consideration and look forward to hearing from you,

Internal Position Resume Guide

A frustrated woman seated at a table with her open laptop. Cover Letter for Internal Position

Although you submitted your resume when applying for your current role, you still need to write a new one for the internal position. Remember, you have made more strides in your career path and achieved new goals along the way, so you should update your resume to reflect those accomplishments. Keep reading for tips on how to write a winning resume .

Why Does Your Internal Position Cover Letter and Resume Matter?

An internal position resume allows you to add the new achievements and skills that you developed while in your current position. For example, you may have attended a coding bootcamp or contributed severally to the success of various company initiatives. Adding these achievements to your resume makes you a strong contender for the position.

Whether you’re seeking an opportunity for a promotion or applying for a new position, hiring managers always expect a fresh resume. An official application process places you in the same position as external candidates, meaning all your application materials are necessary.

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Furthermore, internal resumes allow you to use specific client names, programs, and initiatives that the hiring manager is familiar with. You can include reviews from your colleagues and department manager to prove that you are the ideal candidate. A specific and detailed resume will demonstrate how you’ve made an impact on the company since you were first hired.

Essential Components of Your Internal Position Resume

Unlike typical resumes, resumes for an internal position focus more on your career paths within the company. All you’re doing is adding to an already submitted resume while focusing on relevant achievements, skills, and goals. However, you need to write a new one and include these essential components.

  • Contact information: The header features your full name and contact information. You will include your phone number, physical address, email address, and professional profile, such as LinkedIn. This section also allows you to upgrade your information if you have moved within the employment period.
  • Professional summary. You must write a new professional summary to demonstrate your growth within the company. This section features your career objectives and an overview of your professional life within the organization.
  • Work experience. In an internal resume, this section focuses on your duties and achievements within the company. However, if your previous experience from a different employer is relevant to the position, it is essential to add that to your resume. Alternatively, if you don’t have extensive experience working for the company, you can also rely on previous experience.
  • Education. Your education history is significant because it helps the hiring manager determine whether you’re the right candidate for the role. Add relevant education history to this section.
  • Skills. This section is where you get to brag a little and showcase your skills. Note down previous skills and all the skills you learned as an employee of the company. These can include technical skills and soft skills that are relevant to the position.
  • Additional sections. These sections include the hobbies and interests you picked up, courses, awards, certifications, memberships, and other relevant information. These sections are not mandatory, but they can help boost your resume and place you ahead of other internal candidates.

5 Tips for Writing a Strong Internal Position Resume

Your resume can make or break your application. Generally, hiring managers go through hundreds of resumes, and many lack the patience to understand a poorly written resume. Here are five essential tips to guide you in writing your internal position resume to avoid such instances.

  • Write a new resume. When writing a resume for an internal position, it is advisable to write an entirely new resume instead of editing your previous resume. You will need to add new skills, achievements, and promotions. In addition, writing a new resume shows that you are serious about the job application.
  • Change your professional summary. Altering your summary is important because, over the years, your career aspirations and goals will change. You will achieve your career objectives and develop new ones, making your previous professional summary irrelevant. In addition, your professional summary must align with the target position.
  • Use keywords. Hiring managers seek the services of resume scanning software to select the best resumes. These scanners detect specific keywords set by the managers and separate the resumes accordingly. To ensure your resume is prioritized, go through the job description and include relevant keywords within your application.
  • Focus on your internal achievements. Demonstrate your accomplishments as a hard-working employee, team player, and leader. If the hiring manager is impressed by your hard work and commitment as a loyal employee, you will likely become the best candidate for promotion.
  • Adapt the company language. As an employee, you already understand the company culture. That means you can use company language in certain sections of your resume. For example, if your employer is focused on client satisfaction and mentoring as the key company goals, ensure you strategically add these words to your resume.

Internal Position Resume Examples

If you have a hard time drafting the perfect internal position resume, you can use resume builders, which feature templates and resume samples. We have also outlined two resume examples to guide you during the writing process. One focuses on the skills section and the second one features a full resume template for internal positions.

Internal Position Resume Sample: The Skills Section

While the specific skills included in this section may vary based on the keywords mentioned in the job description, below are some of the typical qualifications professionals tend to have within their documentation.

  • Data analysis, content creation, SEO, and CRM, which are requisite skills in digital marketing
  • Excellent sales skills to enhance client growth and loyalty
  •   Adept leadership skills demonstrated through timely deliveries in the sales department
  • Interpersonal skills to maintain solid client relationships and the marketing team
  • Project management skills to facilitate professional development opportunities
  • Knowledge of Semrush, Google Analytics, Hubspot, WASK, and Act-On

Sample Internal Position Resume Template

Phone Number, Email Address

LinkedIn Profile

PROFESSIONAL SUMMARY

Write a captivating summary that will capture the reader’s attention. In 2-3 sentences, express a bit of your personality, experience level, achievements within the company, and career objectives.

WORK EXPERIENCE

List your work experience using bullet points and in chronological order. Remember to include all your promotions (if any) and responsibilities. You can also list your key achievements below each role.

Company, City, State

Dates Employed

  • List responsibilities

Key Achievements

  • List relevant achievements

List your education starting with the highest degree. If you advanced your education after receiving employment, state that clearly in this section. You don’t have to add high school information if you have a university degree.

List all the relevant skills using bullet points. Remember to tailor these skills to match the job opening. You can refer to the section above.

CERTIFICATIONS AND AWARDS

List all your certifications and awards. You can skip this section if you don’t have any certifications or awards.

Internal Position Resume Template Resources

  • Microsoft . Microsoft offers different resume templates for internal company promotions and transfers. They are downloadable word documents that you can tailor to suit your application.
  • Template.net . This site features several resume templates for different career fields. You will find internal position templates for sales managers, audit directors, communication managers, and more.
  • Indeed . This popular job search platform also offers resources on writing a strong resume. There are templates, tips, and examples for writing your internal position resume. 

Importance of an Internal Position Cover Letter and Resume

An internal position cover letter and resume are essential for the organization and employees. These application materials make the process more credible because all internal candidates follow the same application process. In addition, you have the opportunity to showcase your demonstratable success and contributions to the company.

Internal Position Cover Letter and Resume FAQ

Your cover letter should focus inward, highlighting your contributions to the current company. You will include measurable outcomes of your work and the relevant experience that makes you the ideal candidate for the position.

Yes. A resume is mandatory when applying for an internal promotion or transfer. Writing a fresh resume allows you to include any relevant achievements, skills, and education certificates you attained after your employment. These additions make a significant difference in your job application.

An internal position cover letter is less detailed compared to a resume. Your cover letter offers a brief introduction of your interest in the position and why you are the right candidate. It also highlights significant achievements and skills, whereas a resume gives a more detailed overview of your work experience and broader career plans.

The best way to apply for an internal position is to submit a well-crafted cover letter and resume, expressing your interest in the position. Leverage your skills, achievements, and contribution to the company to prove that you are the right fit. Once your application is submitted, you can send a follow-up a few days or weeks later, depending on the feedback timeframe.

About us: Career Karma is a platform designed to help job seekers find, research, and connect with job training programs to advance their careers. Learn about the CK publication .

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  • Cover Letters

Cover Letters for a Promotion or Internal Position

internal manager cover letter

What to Include in Your Cover Letter

  • Sample Cover Letter for Promotion
  • Email Job Promotion Letter

Applying for a Transfer

More about getting promoted.

When you're being considered for an internal position or a promotion, you may need to write a cover letter to officially apply for the new position within your company.

What should you write in a cover letter for a job at a company where you already work? What's the best way to frame your credentials to secure a promotion?

Here's everything you need to know about crafting the perfect cover letter for an internal role, along with sample letters and writing tips.

A job promotion cover letter should clearly explain your interest in the job and delineate  how you are qualified for the position . The letter should also recap your experience and knowledge of your employer’s current mission and needs, as well as the progressive growth you have enjoyed within the company.

Don't presume the hiring manager or department manager reviewing your qualifications will know your background just because you work for the company.

Sharing the specific details of your history with the organization will help ensure  your resume gets a closer look  and that your qualifications get noticed.

This is especially true when applying for a position at a large company. Also, be prepared to discuss these  qualifications during job interviews .

See below for a general cover letter for a job promotion, as well as an email cover letter written for a retail position.

Sample Cover Letter for a Promotion or Internal Position

This is a cover letter example for an internal position. Download the internal position cover letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online), or see below for more examples.

Lewis Applicant 123 Main Street Anytown, CA 12345 555-555-5555 lewis.applicant@email.com

June 4, 2024

Julia Lee Director, Communications ACME Retail 123 Business Rd. Business City, NY 54321

Dear Ms. Lee,

I would like to formally apply for the Assistant Communications Manager position in the Corporate Communications Department. As you are aware, I have had extensive experience with Acme Retail starting when I participated in your summer editorial intern program while I was still in college.

Since then I have been advanced through progressively more responsible positions in both the Human Resources and Marketing Departments. During my tenure, I have developed exceptional writing and editing skills and have designed and implemented highly successful communication strategies at the departmental level.

I have also demonstrated my ability to work with leaders across business units and multiple lines of business, consistently earning exemplary scores on my annual performance evaluations by my supervisors.

In addition, I have been responsible for benefits communications and employee relations, as well as liaising with the company's clients and vendors to ensure all projects are completed by established milestones.

These are just a few examples of my accomplishments and contributions to our company. I hope you will find that this brief view, in combination with the attached resume, describes a dedicated employee of Acme Retail with the experience and skills to meet or exceed the requirements of the position of Assistant Communications Manager.

I appreciate your consideration and look forward to discussing this opportunity for promotion with you at your convenience. Please let me know if there is any other information I can provide that will support my candidacy for this promotion.

Best regards,

Signature (hard copy letter)

Lewis Applicant

Email Job Promotion Cover Letter

Here's an example of a letter or email message used to apply for a job promotion to a management position at a retail store:

Subject:  Application for Manager - Shoe Department

Dear Janice,

It was with great interest that I read that Human Resources is seeking applications for a new Manager in the Shoe Department. Please accept my resume for review and consideration for this role.

I have been with Casey's for a total of four years, two in my current position of Assistant Manager in the Children's Department, and two as a Sales Associate in the Junior Department. Before coming to Casy's, I worked for Mears as a Sales Associate in the Shoe Department as well as in the Men's Department.

With my experience in varied departments, I feel I would be an asset as a Manager here at Casy's. In my capacity as an Assistant Manager, I successfully took on many of the managerial duties in the Children's Department last year when Suzy Smith was out on maternity leave, and I would welcome the opportunity to bring that same stability, energy, and dedication to the Shoe Department within the vacancy created by Amy Jenner's sudden departure.

I appreciate your consideration for this position. It has been a real pleasure to come to work every day since you hired me, and I thus look forward to continuing to grow in my career at Casy's.

Caroline Xao Assistant Manager, Shoes caroline.xo@caseys.com 555-555-1212

If you're seeking a transfer instead of a promotion, here's a transfer request letter example , a letter to use when you're relocating , and tips for requesting a transfer to a new job with your current employer.

When you're working on getting a promotion, it may take some effort to get noticed by management. There are ways you can enhance your promotability and lay a strong groundwork for a successful move up the career ladder.

Take the time to ensure you're in a perfect position to make the best impression at work and to  get that promotion you're seeking .

Key Takeaways

Provide details. Remind your employer of your history with their company, contributions to their success, and dedication to their corporate mission and goals.

Be grateful. Express your appreciation for the opportunities the employer has given you to grow within your current job with them. This will also serve as a reminder to them that you have taken good advantage of the training and increased responsibilities they have offered you.

Enhance your promotability. From the moment you accept an entry-level position with an employer you respect, look for opportunities to gain the skills that will position you to assume promotions to roles of greater responsibility in the future. 

StandOut CV

Internal Position cover letter examples

Andrew Fennell photo

Are you hoping to secure a new position within your existing company?

An internal move can be the perfect solution if you love the company but you want to progress in your career or try your hand at a different department.

Either way, you need to submit a persuasive application, and we’ve created the following guide, complete with several internal position cover letter examples to help you do just that.

CV templates 

Internal Position cover letter example 1

Internal Position cover letter 1

Internal Position cover letter example 2

Internal Position cover letter 2

Internal Position cover letter example 3

Internal Position cover letter 3

The example cover letters here should give you a good general idea on how your Internal Position cover letter should be formatted and written.

The rest of this guide gives more specific guidance on how to create your own cover letter in this format, and even includes some templates you can copy and paste.

How to write an Internal Position cover letter

Here’s how you can write your own eye-catching cover letter, broken down into simple steps.

How to write a cover letter

Write your cover letter in the body of an email/message

When writing your Internal Position cover letter, it’s best to type the content into the body of your email (or the job site messaging system) and not to attach the cover letter as a separate document.

This ensures that your cover letter gets seen as soon as a recruiter or employer opens your message.

If you attach the cover letter as a document, you’re making the reader go through an unnecessary step of opening the document before reading it.

If it’s in the body of the message itself, it will be seen instantly, which hugely increases the chances of it being read.

Write cover letter in body of email

Start with a friendly greeting

Cover letter address

Start you cover letter with a greeting that is professional but friendly.

This will build rapport with the recruiter whilst showing your professionalism.

  • Hi, hope you’re well
  • Hi [insert recruiter name]
  • Hi [insert department/team name]

Avoid overly formal greetings like “Dear sir/madam ” unless applying to very traditional companies.

How to find the contact’s name?

Addressing the recruitment contact by name is an excellent way to start building a strong relationship. If it is not listed in the job advert, try these methods to find it.

  • Check out the company website and look at their  About page. If you see a hiring manager, HR person or internal recruiter, use their name. You could also try to figure out who would be your manager in the role and use their name.
  • Head to LinkedIn , search for the company and scan through the list of employees. Most professionals are on LinkedIn these days, so this is a good bet.

Identify the role you are applying for

Once you have opened the cover letter with a warm greeting, you need to explain which role you are interested in.

Sometimes a recruitment consultant could be managing over 10 vacancies, so it’s crucial to pinpoint exactly which one you are interested in.

Highlight the department/area if possible and look for any reference numbers you can quote.

These are some examples you can add..

  • I am interested in applying for the role of *Internal Position* with your company.
  • I would like to apply for the role of Sales assistant (Ref: 40f57393)
  • I would like to express my interest in the customer service vacancy within your retail department
  • I saw your advert for an IT project manager on Reed and would like to apply for the role.

See also: CV examples – how to write a CV – CV profiles

Highlight your suitability

The sole objective of your cover letter is to motivate recruiters into to opening your CV. And you achieve this by quickly explaining your suitability to the roles you are applying for.

Take a look at the job descriptions you are applying to, and make note of the most important skills and qualifications being asked for.

Then, when crafting your cover letter, make your suitability the central focus.

Explain why you are the best qualified candidate, and why you are so well suited to carry out the job.

This will give recruiters all the encouragement they need to open your CV and consider you for the job.

Cover letter tips

Keep it short and sharp

When sending a job application to a recruiter or hiring manager, it is important to remember that they will normally be very busy and pushed for time.

Therefore, you need to get you message across to them quickly (in a matter of seconds ideally). So, keep your cover letter short and to-the-point. A long waffling cover letter will overwhelm recruiters when they are running through hundreds of emails in there inbox, but a concise one will get their attention.

So, keep your cover letter to just a few sentences long, and save the extensive detail for your CV.

Sign off professionally

To round of your CV, you should sign off with a professional signature.

This will give your cover letter a slick appearance and also give the recruiter all of the necessary contact information they need to get in touch with you.

The information to add should include:

  • A friendly sign off – e.g. “Kindest regards”
  • Your full name
  • Phone number (one you can answer quickly)
  • Email address
  • Profession title
  • Professional social network –  e.g. LinkedIn

Here is an example signature;

Warm regards,

Jill North IT Project Manager 078837437373 [email protected] LinkedIn

Quick tip: To save yourself from having to write your signature every time you send a job application, you can save it within your email drafts, or on a separate documents that you could copy in.

Email signatures

What to include in your Internal Position cover letter

Your Internal Position cover letter will be unique to your situation, but there are certain content guidelines you should stick to for best results.

To attract and entice recruiters, stick with the following key subjects in your cover letter – adapting them to fit your profession and target jobs.

  • Your professional experience – Employers will be keen to know if your experience is suitable for the job you are applying to, so provide a good summary of it in your cover letter.
  • Your qualifications and education – Highlight your most relevant and high-level of qualification, especially if they are essential to the job.
  • The positive impact you have made – Employers love to hear about the benefits you can bring to them, so shout about anything impressive you have done, such as saving money or improving processes.
  • Your reasons for leaving – Use a few words of your cover letter to explain why you are leaving your current job and ensure you avoid any negative reasons.
  • Your availability – Let recruiters know when you can start a new job . Are you immediately available, or do you have a month notice period?

Internal Position cover letter templates

Copy and paste these Internal Position cover letter templates to get a head start on your own.

I hope you’re well.

I am delighted to submit my application for the open position of Finance Manager. With 7 years of experience overseeing the finance strategy development as Assistant Finance Manager, combined with my recent master’s in business administration, I am confident in my ability to excel in this elevated role.

Throughout my tenure at CFT Construction, I have successfully led the financial planning and analysis for our residential development unit, demonstrating expertise in advanced financial modelling and budgeting. My implementation of a streamlined financial reporting system in 2021 improved accuracy by 20%, while a new budgeting process reduced variance by 15% within the first year. I effectively guided the multinational management team through their EOY financial analysis as well as spearheading new training initiatives which excellent results, which I would continue in this more senior role.

I am deeply committed to ensuring the growth and sustainability of the company and believe that my specialised operational knowledge would make me a great asset in this role. I am available for an interview at your earliest convenience.

All the best,

Jordan Teller ¦ 07777777777 ¦ [email protected]

I am thrilled to apply for the position of Executive Secretary. With my 15+ years of service as an Administrative Secretary within the company and my NVQ Level 4 diploma in Business and Administration, I am confident that I can continue providing excellent secretarial support in this new role.

Having provided unwavering support to management professionals in both the healthcare and marketing industries during my career, I possess a diverse skill set, including project management, diary coordination, and expert transcription and proofreading abilities. Within Lead Marketing, I have contributed significantly, streamlining client follow-up systems, resulting in a remarkable 20% improvement in response time. Additionally, my implementation of an expense tracking system for the senior management team led to a remarkable 38% reduction in overspending.

As a dedicated and detail-oriented professional, I am eager to further contribute to the success of Lead Marketing in the capacity of Executive Secretary. I would love to discuss my vision for this role further in an interview when you have availability.

Thomas Stanley ¦ 07777777777 ¦ [email protected]

I am excited to submit my application for the new role of Senior Fashion Buyer at our company, where I believe my proven track record, diverse skill set, and passion for fashion will make a significant impact.

With over 16 years of experience as a Fashion Buyer in the purchasing team, I have garnered extensive expertise in conducting market research, analysing sales trends, and sourcing products from vendors across Europe and the USA. My ability to curate merchandise assortments that align with the latest fashion trends and consumer preferences has consistently driven sales and profitability, as exemplified by the 15% sales increase and 12% reduction in online markdowns achieved through data-driven product selection. Additionally, my proficiency in supplier management and negotiation has fostered strong working relationships which has been recognised by my training contract with the customer service team.

I am eager to further discuss my accomplishments and strategic vision for Marks & Spencer’s as a Senior Fashion Buyer. I am available for interview at any time.

Sunni Carter ¦ 07777777777 ¦ [email protected]

Writing an impressive cover letter is a crucial step in landing that Internal Position, so taking the time to perfect it is well worth while.

By following the tips and examples above you will be able to create an eye-catching cover letter that will wow recruiters and ensure your CV gets read – leading to more job interviews for you.

Good luck with your job search!

How To Create A Cover Letter For An Internal Position

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In This Guide:

Cover letter for internal position template, setting the tone, connect your experiences and skills.

Show Gratitude (It's Not About Me, Me, Me)

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You've worked hard, put your time in, but now you're looking for something more.

Your dedication and patience have paid off because now you found a new position that you know that you're qualified for.

And best of all: It's inside the company that you're working at.

After seeing how hard you work, your manager may have tapped you on the shoulder for a promotion. Your leadership skills make you the ideal candidate for a management position, and now you need your cover letter to reflect that.

Or maybe you have the drive and ambition to go further than the current position that you're in. You've seen a job opening in another department at your company, and you want to throw your hat in for the position.

Whether you're being promoted or looking for a job that better suits you, your cover letter needs to show that you will excel in the new position that you're applying for.

You have a major leg up on the rest of the competition because you already know the people, vision, and values of the company that you're applying for.

You have your foot in the door, and now all you need to do is pry it open a little more and step in.

We can help you with that.

In this article, you'll learn:

  • How to set the tone for a cover letter for an internal position.
  • How to connect your experiences and skills to the position that you're applying to.
  • How to quantify your achievements at your current job.
  • How to show gratitude to your current manager, team members, and the organization for which you work.

While I've got you here, if you're looking to create a cover letter which will wow any hiring manager, Enhancv has over 500 examples of professional cover letters to gain information from.

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Drop your resume here or choose a file . PDF & DOCX only. Max 2MB file size.

Dwayne J. Nicole

Marketing Analyst

312-456-5555

[email protected]

Linkedin.com/in/dwayne-nicole

Chicago, April 18, 2022

Bryanna Bartlett

Senior Marketing Director

Northern Electric, Inc.

450 Pullman Road

Chicago, Illinois

Dear Mrs. Bartlett,

As a loyal employee of Northern Electric, I am excited to be interviewing for the position of Marketing Manager in the North-east region. I have worked under Shawn Tuttle for the last few years as a marketing analyst. Shawn has mentored me in the role of customer relationship management for the last three years, and I have grown leaps and bounds in my understanding of how to properly market and sell the products of Northern Electric. I am truly grateful that Shawn has recommended me for this promotion, and I also feel confident that I can excel in this role and help to provide future growth to the company.

I have been with the company for over 10 years, starting out on the sales team. I pride myself on my ability to learn quickly, and I have developed excellent communication skills, with both customers and team members. As well, I create a great rapport with the customers with whom I spoke, making sure that their needs were covered, which can be easily seen in my customer satisfaction which is 97%.

In the last three years working under Shawn, I've gained experience overseeing sales teams, and as a result of my work I have seen my sales team produce a 5% increase in profits this quarter. In fact, under my leadership, we saw sales of our new line of PLC computers grow by almost 10%. Throughout this time, one of the things that differentiated me from other marketing analyst team leaders was that I promoted a holistic view of customer relationships, utilizing Customer Relationship Management software. I gained a special understanding of how to turn inbound leads into clients, all the while prioritizing the needs of the clients.

I've read the job description for the marketing manager of the North-eastern region, and I believe I will excel in the position because I have already performed many of the requirements found within. I have filled leadership positions, and I excelled because I chose a servant leadership model, one in which I chose to lead from the front and take into consideration the needs of other team members.

Thank you for your time and consideration in reviewing my application. My supervisor will be happy to meet with you to shed light on any of the items that I mentioned in this cover letter. Please reach out to me if you need more information about my work experience and technical skills. I would be happy to help with anything that you need.

Dwayne Nicole

Writing a cover letter for an internal position is like reuniting with an old friend.

You are a known entity within your organization .

Good for you! That first step of networking is already out of the way!

It may be even better if you are applying for a new position within your organization which is overseen by your current manager.

And even if you don't have a relationship with your hiring manager, you will have made a name for yourself within the organization. They will know of you, even before you apply for the job.

But before you jump into writing your cover letter, the tone that you use for your letter is incredibly important. Check out the tips below to help craft a cover letter which hits the mark:

Keep The Tone Professional

One of the most important things to keep in mind when writing a cover letter is that it is a formal letter.

An article in the Atlantic states that a cover letter's main purpose, from when it was first introduced in the US in the 1930's, was "to paint a picture that might not easily emerge from the denser material that was, well, under cover."

What a cover letter does is show the hiring manager that you are the most capable, dependable person for the position.

If you want to show that you are the most capable person for the position, keep the tone fairly professional by using these methods:

Properly Format Your Cover Letter Header

By including a properly formatted cover letter header, you show you view this document as a formal, professional letter. Even if you are simply dropping the letter off in your manager's office, be sure to include information like:

  • Personal information: your name, your email address, phone number,
  • The date you are writing
  • The hiring managers information: their name, position in the company, and the address of your company.

If you'd like to see more examples of how to format your cover letter header, check out this article on Enhancv which provides examples and solutions to create a properly formatted cover letter header.

Keep The Body of The Letter Professional

Remember, a cover letter is a document that is addressed to a specific person, usually the hiring manager. Even if you know the hiring manager from your current position, try to keep informalities out of the writing.

Also, try to avoid negative comments about your current manager.

Use Your Cover Letter To Tell a Story

The dominant tone of your cover letter should be geared towards an exploration of your story , with an emphasis on what makes you exceptional, and the ideal candidate to fill this position.

It's hard to sell ourselves. Even those whose current role is in the sales and marketing field may have a difficult time with sharing about what makes us unique.

Many of us have been told from when we were little we shouldn't brag about ourselves.

But I'll tell you that when writing a cover letter, the most important thing you can do is share about your accomplishments, how you've grown as a leader and gained technical skills and abilities.

It's not bragging to explain where you excelled in your position.

Soft Skills Vs. Hard Skills

Soft skills.

Soft skills involve people skills, like communication, leadership, and any habits which make you work better in a team. When you are applying for a promotion, highlight the soft skills that you've gained through your current position, especially those that involve leadership.

Soft skills to promote in your cover letter include:

  • Your ability to collaborate within teams
  • Your public speaking ability
  • Your ability to problem solve
  • How you manage your time
  • Leadership skills
  • Your ability to adapt

Check out this article if you’d like find descriptive words to describe yourself:

The Best Words to Describe Yourself on a Resume

Hard Skills

Alternatively, hard skills are technical skills which you gain through years of experience working in your field, as well as skills that you've gained through school or other courses. If you're considering transferring to another department, highlight relevant technical skills which would make you the perfect fit for that department.

Although hard skills completely depend on the field within which you work, let's look at one example which can help you understand which hard skills to promote. If you are an IT security manager, some hard skills that you could promote include:

  • Your knowledge of cloud computing
  • How you visualize and create virtual images or maps
  • Your experience with IT Security management software
  • Your understanding of enterprise architecture management

Highlight Soft Skills For A Promotion

When you write a cover letter for a promotion, you should highlight your experience in a leadership role. Provide examples from your current job of when you've managed teams of colleagues.

Point to quantitative results that you've shown as a leader of a team. If you’ve seen a major sales profits increase while you were the team leader, mention that you were the one leading, encouraging, and facilitating the growth of your team members throughout the process.

Here are some examples which you can use for your cover letter:

  • If you were the team lead for a sales team and you saw sales increase in one quarter 6%, highlight those results in your cover letter.
  • If you introduced new software which allowed your team to better collaborate on projects, as well as introducing everyone to that software, mention the percentage of people that adopted the software into their regular, everyday work.

Promote Hard Skills for a Transfer

When you're moving laterally within a company, moving from one department to another, you should consider highlighting hard skills that you've learned in your current position, which are transferable to another department.

Transferring is typical within the IT industry, and many of the skills you gain in one position can be transferred to another department.

For example, if you were working in the IT field and you wanted to get to the cyber security field, there are a lot of skills that you may have gained along the way which could be promoted in a cover letter:

  • Mention any courses that you've taken throughout your time working in the IT field. Specifically, if you've learned specialized cyber security software, mention the software by name.
  • Highlight the role that you may have played in addressing the company's need for greater security of cloud computing programs.

Show Gratitude (It's Not About Me, Me, Me)

In your cover letter, try to give credit to where credit is due. If you're mentioning your current supervisor, highlight the ways in which they have played a major role in making you into the person you are today.

Every single person on this earth can owe their success to a select number of people in their life.

Show gratitude to those that have helped you.

Also, a cover letter is written to a specific person, and therefore, shows some gratitude to the person who is reading the cover letter. Thank the hiring manager for taking the time to read through your cover letter. Ask them if they need any more information from you.

If you're interested in learning more about how to end your cover letter, check out this article on how to end your cover letter .

  • Keep the tone of your cover letter professional by including a properly formatted cover letter header.
  • When transferring to a new position in your company, use hard technical skills that you've learned to prove your competency.
  • When writing a cover letter for promotion, highlight the soft skills that you've learned, like communication, collaboration, and problem-solving skills.
  • Show gratitude to your current manager as well as the hiring manager whose reading the document.

Creating a cover letter from scratch isn’t easy. We totally get it! So why not let us help you? At Enhancv, we have a custom Cover Letter Builder which you can use to create the perfect cover letter for an internal position.

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Status.net

How to Write a Perfect Cover Letter for Internal Position

By Status.net Editorial Team on October 17, 2023 — 13 minutes to read

  • Understanding the Basics of an Internal Cover Letter Part 1
  • Example of a Successful Cover Letter for Internal Position Part 2
  • How to Write a Perfect Cover Letter for Internal Position Part 3
  • How to Highlight Your Skills and Achievements Part 4
  • Aligning Your Goals with the Company’s Vision Part 5
  • How to Close Your Cover Letter Part 6

Part 1 Understanding the Basics of an Internal Cover Letter

When crafting an internal cover letter, your main goal is to showcase your skills, work experience, and achievements in a way that demonstrates your value within your current organization. Since you’re already part of the company, you have the advantage of being familiar with its culture, goals, and priorities.

  • Start by addressing your internal cover letter to the hiring manager or the person responsible for the internal job posting. Be sure to include the specific job title you’re applying for, mentioning the internal job posting number if applicable, to ensure clarity.
  • In the opening paragraph, express your enthusiasm for the new opportunity and briefly mention your current role in the company. Highlight your understanding of the job requirements and explain why you are the ideal candidate for the position. Share your achievements and the impact you’ve had in your current role, using specific examples such as project successes or increased team productivity.
  • In the middle paragraphs, delve into your accomplishments and skills that are relevant to the desired role. Discuss your proficiency in specific software, tools, or processes that are essential for the new position. Show the connections between your current skills and the new role requirements, demonstrating your ability to adapt and contribute to the company’s success.
  • Don’t forget to mention any relevant professional development or training you’ve completed, showcasing your commitment to personal growth within the organization. Also, share any instances where you’ve worked closely with the team or department you’re applying to join, further proving your ability to collaborate and work well within that particular group.
  • As you wrap up your letter, reiterate your enthusiasm and interest in the role, expressing your gratitude for being considered. Make sure to include your contact information, inviting the hiring manager to reach out with any questions or to schedule an interview. Remember to proofread your cover letter before submitting it to ensure it is error-free and professionally presented.

Part 2 Example of a Successful Cover Letter for Internal Position

Dear [Name],

I was excited to read about the [Job Title] position within our company. With my extensive experience in [Department] and proven record of [Accomplishment], I believe I’m a strong fit for the role.

In my current position as a [Your Current Job Title], I have achieved [Provide Examples of Successes]. I also recognize the importance of [Skills or Qualifications Required for the New Role] and have honed my skills in these areas through [Courses, Certifications, or Workplace Experience]. I’m eager to apply my expertise to this new challenge and make an even greater impact on our team.

I appreciate your consideration for this internal opportunity and look forward to the chance to discuss my candidacy further.

Sincerely, [Your Name]

Dear [Hiring Manager’s Name],

I’m writing to express my keen interest in the [Specific Job Title] position, as advertised internally under [Job Posting Number]. Having been a dedicated member of the [Company Name] team, I am excited about the opportunity to contribute my skills and experience to [Department or Team Name].

In my current role as [Your Current Position], I’ve had the privilege of collaborating closely with the [Department or Team Name] team on projects such as [mention a specific project]. This experience has allowed me to understand the team’s dynamics and the importance of teamwork in achieving our goals.

One of my notable achievements during my tenure here has been [mention a specific achievement], where I [briefly explain the achievement and its impact]. This accomplishment reflects my ability to meet challenges head-on and drive tangible results.

I believe my proficiency in [mention relevant skills or tools] and my understanding of [mention industry-specific knowledge] align well with the requirements of the [Specific Job Title] role. Additionally, my commitment to continuous improvement is evident through my participation in [mention relevant professional development or training].

I value the relationships I’ve built within the [Department or Team Name] team and look forward to strengthening these bonds as we work together towards achieving our shared objectives.

I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss my potential contribution to the [Department or Team Name] team further. Please feel free to contact me at [Your Phone Number] or [Your Email Address] to arrange a conversation at your convenience.

Thank you for considering my application. I am eager to continue my journey with [Company Name] in this new capacity.

[Your Name]

Part 3 How to Write a Perfect Cover Letter for Internal Position

Starting your cover letter on the right note sets the tone for the rest of its content. Begin by addressing the hiring manager or your direct supervisor if you know their name. If you’re unsure of the name, you can use a professional-sounding, generic greeting like “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To the [Department] Team” .

Next, express your excitement for the opportunity to apply for the internal position. Share something positive about the company that has inspired you during your time there:

“Since joining the team two years ago, I have been consistently impressed by [Company]’s dedication to innovation and our clients’ success. I am excited about the prospect of continuing to contribute to these values in the [Position Title] role.”

Briefly introduce the purpose of your cover letter in a clear and succinct way:

“I am writing to express my interest in the [Position Title] role that was recently posted on the company’s internal job board. With my experience in [relevant skills/department], I believe I can make a significant impact in this new position.”

In the following paragraphs, make sure to convey how your background and experience align with the job requirements. Focus on highlighting your accomplishments and transferable skills, which will demonstrate your competence for the role. For example:

“During my two years in the [your current department], I have successfully managed and completed [achieved goal/project], resulting in a [measurable outcome, e.g., 15% increase in productivity]. I have also taken on additional responsibilities, such as [extra work/tasks], showcasing my adaptability and commitment to [Company].”

Emphasize your eagerness to discuss the opportunity further in an interview. Mention your availability to meet and provide additional details about your qualifications:

“I am enthusiastic about the prospect of bringing my expertise and passion to the [Position Title] role and would welcome the opportunity to discuss my candidacy further. Please let me know when we can arrange a meeting to discuss how my skills can help [Company] reach its goals.”

Remember to maintain a friendly yet professional tone throughout your cover letter, and focus on showcasing the value you bring to the company and the position. Keep it concise and engaging, and you’ll be one step closer to securing that internal opportunity.

Part 4 How to Highlight Your Skills and Achievements

Emphasize how your current skills and experiences are relevant to the position you’re applying for. Here are some tips for effectively highlighting your skills and achievements:

1. Focus on relevant skills and experiences : Make sure to include the key skills and experiences that are specifically required for the position. Think about your current responsibilities, any projects you’ve successfully completed, and any experience in the department you are applying to.

2. Quantify your achievements : Whenever possible, provide specific numbers or metrics to demonstrate how your accomplishments positively impacted the company. For example, mention the percentage increase in efficiency in a process you improved, or the amount you saved by implementing a new strategy.

“As the Marketing Coordinator for the past two years, I have successfully managed multiple campaigns, increasing our brand visibility by 30% and achieving 20% growth in online sales.”

3. Try to use action verbs : Begin your sentences with strong action verbs such as developed, implemented, or managed. This not only makes your cover letter more engaging but also emphasizes the impact of your achievements.

Example : “ In my current role, I successfully managed a team of 12 and implemented a new workflow process, which increased department efficiency by 18%. This experience has provided me with valuable insights on managing diverse teams and delivering projects within tight deadlines.”

“In my role as Customer Service Representative, I successfully implemented a new system for handling customer inquiries, resulting in a 25% increase in efficiency.”

“I have become well-versed in working with cross-functional teams, and my strong communication skills have allowed me to collaborate effectively with colleagues at all levels of the organization. These experiences will serve me well in the Project Manager position, where teamwork and communication are crucial for success.” “Through regular collaboration with the marketing team, I have developed strong interpersonal and project management skills that will be valuable in my potential role as Marketing Coordinator.” Finally, make a connection between your current role and the internal position you are applying for. Explain how your experiences and strengths make you an ideal candidate for the new opportunity. For example: “With my extensive experience in customer service, I have a deep understanding of our client base. This knowledge, combined with my marketing skills, will help me excel in the Marketing Coordinator position and drive the success of our campaigns.” Do not be afraid to show some personality while maintaining a professional tone. This will give your cover letter a unique touch and help you stand out from other applicants. Consider sharing relevant connections to the new role or any special interests that make you a great fit for the position: “Outside of work, I am an active member of our local environmental group, which has allowed me to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities in the field. This passion will enable me to drive positive change in our projects and create even more impactful solutions for our customers.

4. Show enthusiasm for the internal position : Express your excitement about the opportunity to grow and contribute within the company. Mention any specific aspects of the position that inspire you, such as the potential for leadership or the opportunity to learn new skills.

Example : “ Having spent three years in our company’s marketing department, I am enthusiastic about the opportunity to apply for the Senior Marketing Analyst role. I’m excited to leverage my experience in data analysis and strategic planning to contribute to our company’s growth in this leadership role.”

“I am passionate about our company’s goal to provide innovative, eco-friendly products to consumers worldwide. Through my marketing efforts, I have helped establish our brand as a leader in the industry, and I am excited to bring that same dedication to the Project Manager role.”

Use these tips to create a compelling cover letter that highlights your skills and achievements, and leaves a lasting impression on the hiring manager.

Part 5 Aligning Your Goals with the Company’s Vision

You’re already familiar with the organization’s values and objectives since you currently work there. Emphasize on how the new role will allow you to contribute even more towards the company’s growth and success.

As a dedicated employee at XYZ Inc., I have always been inspired by our mission to provide sustainable solutions for our clients. Pursuing the Project Manager role will enable me to contribute more effectively to this mission by managing resources and leading teams efficiently.

Highlighting your relevant achievements within the company is another way to align your goals with the organization’s vision. Mention any significant accomplishments and how they have positively impacted the business. For example:

In my current role as a Marketing Coordinator, I successfully launched our new product line, resulting in a 20% increase in sales. I am confident that my skills and experience in marketing will transfer seamlessly to the Project Manager role, allowing me to make an even greater impact on our company’s success.

To showcase the longevity of your commitment to the organization, discuss your long-term goals within the company and in the new position. Here’s a possible way to do this:

I see the Project Manager role as an opportunity not only to contribute more to XYZ Inc. but also to grow and develop professionally. In the future, I hope to further expand my skills, take on more complex projects, and continue to support the company’s mission.

Using these strategies in your cover letter will help demonstrate the synergies between your personal goals and the company’s vision.

Part 6 How to Close Your Cover Letter

Ending your cover letter on a strong note is essential. The closing paragraph should leave a lasting impression on the reader, expressing gratitude and excitement about the opportunity. Here’s how you can close your cover letter effectively:

1. Reiterate your interest and qualifications : Briefly summarize your key skills, highlighting how you are a great fit for the internal position. This will help the reader to remember your strengths and achievements by the time they finish reading your letter.

Example: “I am confident that my background in marketing, combined with my innovative mindset and passion for the brand, make me an ideal candidate for the Marketing Manager role.”

2. Mention your desire to contribute : Internal positions offer you a chance to grow and benefit the company. Communicate that you’re excited to use your skills to provide value and that you’re eager to make a positive impact.

Example: “ Given my in-depth knowledge of our company’s goals, I look forward to leveraging my experience in driving successful marketing initiatives and contributing to our team’s overall success.”

3. Show gratitude : Appreciate the opportunity to be considered for this position and thank the reader for their time and consideration. This shows your professional attitude and acknowledges the effort made by the hiring team.

Example: “Thank you for considering me for the Marketing Manager position. I appreciate the opportunity to further discuss how my experience and skills can support the team’s objectives.”

4. Close with a call-to-action : Encourage the reader to take the next step and let them know you’re excited to continue the conversation. Prompt them to reach out to you, and provide the best way they can contact you.

Example: “I am eager to discuss my potential contributions and would be happy to answer any questions or provide further information. Please feel free to contact me at [email address] or [phone number] at your convenience.”

To end your cover letter formally, use a closing salutation such as “Sincerely” or “Best regards.”

Frequently Asked Questions

1. what are the key elements to include in a cover letter for an internal position.

A well-written cover letter for an internal position should include:

  • A specific mention of the job you’re applying for.
  • A clear and concise summary of your qualifications and experience.
  • Examples of your accomplishments within the company.
  • An expression of your enthusiasm for the new role.
  • A mention of how your familiarity with the company adds value.

2. How should I tailor my cover letter when applying for a promotion within my current company?

To tailor your cover letter for an internal promotion, be sure to:

  • Emphasize your achievements within the company.
  • Address any new skills or qualifications required for the position.
  • Reference specific projects or initiatives you’ve contributed to.
  • Explain how your knowledge of the company culture can benefit the new role.
  • Show that you’re familiar with the responsibilities and expectations of the position.

4. What tips can you offer on showcasing my achievements in my internal cover letter?

To showcase your achievements in your internal cover letter:

  • Quantify your accomplishments using numbers or percentages.
  • Highlight how your achievements have benefitted the company or team.
  • Discuss specific projects or initiatives you’ve contributed to.
  • Use strong and confident language when describing your successes.
  • Provide context by tying your achievements to the required skills or qualifications of the new role.

5. How can I address my familiarity with the company culture in my cover letter for an internal position?

To address your familiarity with the company culture, you can:

  • Mention how your understanding of the company’s values and goals allows you to contribute effectively.
  • Discuss experiences working with diverse teams or cross-department collaborations.
  • Explain how your knowledge of company procedures helps you navigate day-to-day responsibilities.
  • Share examples of how you’ve fostered a positive work environment or supported company initiatives.
  • Indicate that your existing relationships with colleagues can facilitate a smoother transition into the new role.
  • Cover Letter vs. Letter of Interest vs. Letter of Intent
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  • How To Write a Cover Letter [Inspiring Examples]
  • How to Write a Career Change Cover Letter [Examples]
  • How to Write a Letter of Employment (Templates, Examples)

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Find a Job You Really Want In

When you find a position you’re interested in, you’ll likely still need to apply just like everyone else, which means you shouldn’t neglect your cover letter. This is why knowing how to write a cover letter for an internal position is important.

Whether you’re going for an internal position or a promotion, we’ve got you covered. In this article, we’ll go over how to write a cover letter for an internal position or promotion, provide a sample cover letter, and give you some tips to keep in mind when writing yours.

Key Takeaways

When writing a cover letter for promotion, you should put just as much effort into it as you would when applying to an external position — don’t assume you’ll automatically get any favor just because you already work at the company.

Be specific about why you’re the right candidate for this role and how you’d help the company by working in that new capacity.

Your cover letter for internal promotion should only be one page long, so include only the necessary details.

How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internal Position or Promotion

How to write a cover letter for an internal position or promotion

Cover letter example for an internal position or promotion, cover letter for an internal position or promotion template, tips for writing a promotion or internal cover letter, how an internal cover letter differs from a standard cover letter, cover letter for internal position faq.

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In order to craft a stand-out cover letter that will stand out among the pile of other applications, it will be crucial to understand the specific elements that should be included. Those include (in order of appearance):

Date and contact formation. This should include your contact information and the date of submission.

Be sure to also include the employer, hiring manager , or recruiter’s name (whoever will be reading the cover letter) and professional information.

Opening paragraph. Explain how your current role prepared you for the new position. Include information regarding the specific role and department that you’re applying for.

Body paragraph. This should be a detailed (but brief) explanation of your current role, previous experience, and notable achievements at your employer’s company. Be sure to highlight both “hard skills” (technical skills) as well as “soft skills” (interpersonal communication skills).

Closing paragraph. This paragraph should show your expression of gratitude to your employer for your previous experience with the company up to this point, and for the opportunity to be considered for the role you’re now applying for.

You can also include information regarding how the recipient – i.e., the hiring manager or your employer – can get in touch with a trusted referral (be sure to confirm with that referral beforehand that he or she is willing to have their information included in your cover letter).

Closing and sign off. End with an appropriate closing and your signature if you’ll be handing in a physical copy of the cover letter.

How to write a cover letter

Keeping in mind all of the themes that we’ve already outlined above, here’s a cover letter sample for an internal position or promotion:

August 10, 2023 Marissa Swarts Human Resources Manager Swarts & Sons Enterprises [email protected] Dear Mrs. Swarts, I’m excited to submit my candidacy for the role of Content Strategist in the company’s Marketing department. I began my employment with Swarts amp; Sons in August 2018 as an Assistant Copywriter. I have spent the last two years honing and broadening my abilities and learning a great deal from my managers within the department. I believe that the job requirements of the Content Strategist role that you’ve outlined on the company website match the skill set I have developed during my tenure with the company. I’ve contributed to a wide range of valuable projects for the company. Beginning in February of 2019, I spearheaded the new blog strategy which has become the primary format for blog post drafting and publishing across the entire Marketing department. Additionally, I helped launch a department-wide training program on basic SEO practices in May 2019. This program has boosted our company’s website traffic by as much as 25%. If you’re interested in learning more about my experience and accomplishments within the company, I encourage you to reach out to my supervisor , Edwin James ([email protected]). I have worked closely with Mr. James over the course of the last two years, and he would be glad to answer any questions that you might have about my suitability for the Content Strategist role. Thank you very much for your time and for the opportunity to be considered for this position. It’s been a great privilege working with Swarts amp; Sons, and I look forward to continuing to grow within the company. Sincerely, Andy Axelrod

Here is a template to help you get started on your cover letter. Be sure you tailor it to your specific needs before sending it to your hiring manager or recuiter.

August 10, 2023 Dear, Mr. Smith, I am writing to express my strong interest in the [position name] within [department name], as advertised on the company’s internal job posting. Having been part of the [current department name] team for [years on the team], I am excited to have the opportunity to contribute my skills to a new role that aligns closely with my career aspirations and the goals of the company. Throughout my time with [company name], I have consistently demonstrated a deep commitment to the company’s success, such as [mention specific achievements, projects, or initiatives you’ve been involved with]. In my current position as [current position title], I have developed a foundation in [mention specific skills, responsibilities, or accomplishments], which I believe puts me in a position for success in [position you’re applying for]. I am particularly excited about [mention specific aspects that intrigue you]. This opportunity aligns perfectly with my long-term career goals, and I am eager to contribute to [department name]’s success. Thank you for your consideration. I welcome the chance to discuss how my experience and enthusiasm align with [position name] in more detail at [your contact information]. Please find my resume attached for your review. Sincerely, [your name]

You should never assume that you will get the position just because you have experience within the company. You should also stick to a professional format when writing your letter. Here are some more tips to keep in mind when writing your cover letter for a promotion or an internal position:

Don’t assume. Don’t expect that you’ll be chosen solely on the basis of the fact that you have experience within the company you’re applying to. If you’re keenly interested in a job opening, there’s a very good chance that a large number of other internal (as well as external) applicants are too. Make the effort to put your best foot forward with a polished application and cover letter.

Be truthfully self-promoting. By drafting and submitting a high-quality cover letter, you have a golden opportunity to communicate the specific reasons why you’re the ideal candidate for the role in a way that doesn’t sound braggy. Talk about your skills and accomplishments without stretching the truth but also without being self-deprecatingly modest.

Don’t take your cover letter lightly. In many cases, it (along with resumes ) will be a key factor in a hiring manager’s decision regarding which applicants are qualified to advance to the interview stage .

Stick to a classic, professional format. Adhering closely to a tried-and-true cover letter template (like the one we’ve outlined above) will help you to create a cover letter that will grab the eye of any hiring manager without making them work too hard to figure out how your letter is laid out.

Remember brevity is important. Hiring managers and HR employees tend to be very busy people, and it’s one of their job requirements to review dozens (and sometimes hundreds) of job requirements.

Don’t lie. You should never lie on your cover letter or resume, but this is especially important for a cover letter for an internal position or promotion.

Now, it’s important to understand from the outset that the process of drafting a cover letter for an internal position or promotion will differ in some important respects from that of a cover letter that’s submitted by an external applicant.

Cover letter for internal position. In the case of a cover letter for an internal position or promotion, the hiring manager will very likely already be (at least somewhat) familiar with the applicant’s background and experience, which makes it very important for the applicant to record details as truthfully as possible.

Standard cover letter. In the latter case, an employer will be largely unfamiliar with the applicant’s professional profile, so there’s always the chance that the applicant might risk exaggerating (or fabricating) some of the information that’s included. This leads to an understandable wariness in the minds of many hiring managers when they’re reviewing the qualifications of an external candidate.

It’s also important to bear in mind that internal applicants have some significant advantages over external applicants in the review and hiring process. As an internal applicant, you’ll be able to:

Draw on specific contributions that you’ve already made to the company

Include references who are (ideally) trusted acquaintances of the hiring manager

Understand what the company values and use that to your advantage

These factors make it much more likely that your application will be favored – and ultimately selected – during the hiring process.

Do you write a cover letter for an internal position?

Yes, you should write a cover letter when applying for an internal position. Writing a well-crafted cover letter helps distinguish you as a strong candidate for promotion among your competition and allows you to formally apply for the position.

How do I write a cover letter for a promotion?

When writing a cover letter for a promotion, be sure to explain your interest in the job and what your qualifications are for the position. Although your hiring manager may already know your accomplishments and experience, it’s a good idea to reiterate them all in one document to demonstrate your readiness for a new position.

Additionally, you should include your knowledge of the company’s mission, needs, and the growth you have experienced in your current position thus far.

Including these things reminds your employer that you have a history with the company, that you have directly contributed to its success, and that you are invested in its mission and goals.

Craft your cover letter for promotion exactly as you would a regular cover letter, but be sure to add the prior mentioned specifics to demonstrate the value of promoting an internal employee versus hiring an outside candidate.

The first paragraph should begin with a statement of interest regarding the position. Here you can summarize your career goals and any stand-out qualifications or accomplishments.

Your second paragraph should discuss your qualifications and experience in more detail by including figures and data when possible.

Your third paragraph should expand on your improvements in your current job since joining the company. Be sure to tie these to the open position at hand.

Your final paragraph should remind the hiring manager of your interest and include the next step in the hiring process. Don’t forget to express your gratitude before signing off with a formal closing.

How do you start a promotion cover letter?

Start your promotion cover letter by saying, “I would like to formally apply for the [job title] position in the [department].

When you send a cover letter internally, it’s assumed you have discussed the position at hand with your current or new hiring manager.

They may anticipate you applying, so it’s a great idea to articulate that this is simply your formal application when crafting your cover letter.

How long should your cover letter be for an internal position?

Your cover letter should only be one page for an internal position. You should only include the necessary details that pertain to the position that you are applying to. Your cover letter should be one page single-spaced.

Is a cover letter for a promotion necessary?

Yes, a cover letter for a promotion is necessary if the job requires one. You should never assume that you are going to get a promotion just because you work for the company. You should write your cover letter the same way you would if you were applying as an outside candidate. Make sure you are professional in your letter. Just because you work with the hiring manager doesn’t mean you can slack off.

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Kate is a graduate of Brigham Young University, where she completed a degree in Comparative Literature with a minor in Mathematics. She lives in the Pacific Northwest and enjoys hiking and reading.

Matt Warzel a President of a resume writing firm (MJW Careers, LLC) with 15+ years of recruitment, outplacement, career coaching and resume writing experience. Matt is also a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Internet Recruiter (CIR) with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Marketing Focus) from John Carroll University.

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Internal Communications Manager Cover Letter Examples & Writing Tips

Use these Internal Communications Manager cover letter examples and writing tips to help you write a powerful cover letter that will separate you from the competition.

internal manager cover letter

Table Of Contents

  • Internal Communications Manager Example 1
  • Internal Communications Manager Example 2
  • Internal Communications Manager Example 3
  • Cover Letter Writing Tips

Internal communications managers are responsible for developing and executing communication plans that align with the company’s goals. They work with a variety of departments to ensure that employees have the information they need to do their jobs.

In order to be successful in this role, you need excellent communication skills and a strong understanding of the company’s culture. Use these examples and tips to write a cover letter that will show hiring managers that you’re the perfect candidate for the job.

Internal Communications Manager Cover Letter Example 1

I am excited to be applying for the Internal Communications Manager position at Topdown Communications. I have more than 10 years of experience in communications and media, and I believe my skills and experience would be a valuable addition to your team.

I have a proven track record in developing and executing successful communications plans. I have a keen eye for detail and a knack for finding creative solutions to complex problems. I am also an excellent writer and have a strong understanding of the latest communications technologies.

Most recently, I was the Communications Manager at ABC Corporation. In this role, I was responsible for developing and executing a communications plan that increased employee engagement by 20%. I also successfully launched a new intranet platform that improved communication and collaboration among employees.

I am confident that I have the skills and experience to be a successful Internal Communications Manager at Topdown Communications. I am eager to join your team and contribute to your continued success. I look forward to hearing from you soon.

Internal Communications Manager Cover Letter Example 2

I am writing in regards to the Internal Communications Manager position that was recently advertised. I am confident that I have the skills and experience that would make me the perfect candidate for the job.

For the past three years, I have been working as an Internal Communications Manager for a large company. In this role, I have been responsible for developing and implementing communication plans that align with the company’s overall strategy. I have also been in charge of creating and managing all internal communications channels, including the company website, intranet, and social media platforms.

I have a proven track record of success in this field, and I have received positive feedback from both my colleagues and clients. I am confident that I can deliver exceptional results for your company as well.

I am eager to discuss this opportunity further with you and would appreciate the chance to come in for an interview. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Internal Communications Manager Cover Letter Example 3

I am writing to express my interest in the Internal Communications Manager position that you have posted. I believe that my experience and skills make me a strong candidate for this position.

I have been working in the communications field for over 10 years, with a focus on internal communications. I have worked in both corporate and nonprofit environments, which has given me a unique perspective on how to communicate effectively with employees. I have also had the opportunity to work with some of the best companies in the world, including Apple, Google, and Microsoft. These experiences have taught me how to work with different types of people and how to be flexible when dealing with different situations.

My background includes managing all aspects of internal communications, including employee newsletters, intranet sites, social media, and more. I have also managed teams of up to 20 people, which has given me valuable leadership experience. I am confident that I can lead your team to success.

I would love the opportunity to meet with you in person to discuss my qualifications and how I can contribute to your company’s success. Please feel free to contact me at any time with questions or concerns. Thank you for your consideration.

Internal Communications Manager Cover Letter Writing Tips

1. showcase your writing skills.

Internal communications managers are responsible for creating and editing all written content that is circulated internally. This means that you’ll need to have excellent writing skills in order to be successful in the role.

In your cover letter, showcase your writing style by providing a brief writing sample. This could be a press release, memo, or email that you’ve written in the past. If possible, try to choose a piece that is relevant to the company you’re applying to.

2. Highlight your experience

Internal communications managers need to have a lot of experience in a variety of different areas. Some of the most important areas include:

  • Copywriting
  • Project management
  • Public relations

Make sure to highlight any relevant experience you have in these areas in your cover letter. This will show hiring managers that you have the skills and experience necessary to be successful in the role.

3. Demonstrate your understanding of the company

In order to create effective communications, it’s important for internal communications managers to have a deep understanding of the company they’re working for. This means doing your research before you apply and reading up on the latest news and announcements.

In your cover letter, mention how you’ve been following the company and what you think are the most important communications challenges they face. This will show hiring managers that you’re interested in the company and have taken the time to learn about their business.

4. Proofread your cover letter

One of the most common mistakes internal communications managers make is not proofreading their cover letters. This is a big mistake, as it can easily disqualify you from the hiring process.

Make sure to read over your cover letter multiple times to catch any errors. Have a friend or family member look it over as well, as they may be able to find mistakes that you missed.

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internal manager cover letter

How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

I ’ve read thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of cover letters in my career. If you’re thinking that sounds like really boring reading, you’re right. What I can tell you from enduring that experience is that most cover letters are terrible — and not only that, but squandered opportunities. When a cover letter is done well, it can significantly increase your chances of getting an interview, but the vast majority fail that test.

So let’s talk about how to do cover letters right.

First, understand the point of a cover letter.

The whole idea of a cover letter is that it can help the employer see you as more than just your résumé. Managers generally aren’t hiring based solely on your work history; your experience is crucial, yes, but they’re also looking for someone who will be easy to work with, shows good judgment, communicates well, possesses strong critical thinking skills and a drive to get things done, complements their current team, and all the other things you yourself probably want from your co-workers. It’s tough to learn much about those things from job history alone, and that’s where your cover letter comes in.

Because of that …

Whatever you do, don’t just summarize your résumé.

The No. 1 mistake people make with cover letters is that they simply use them to summarize their résumé. This makes no sense — hiring managers don’t need a summary of your résumé! It’s on the very next page! They’re about to see it as soon as they scroll down. And if you think about it, your entire application is only a few pages (in most cases, a one- or two-page résumé and a one-page cover letter) — why would you squander one of those pages by repeating the content of the others? And yet, probably 95 percent of the cover letters I see don’t add anything new beyond the résumé itself (and that’s a conservative estimate).

Instead, your cover letter should go beyond your work history to talk about things that make you especially well-suited for the job. For example, if you’re applying for an assistant job that requires being highly organized and you neurotically track your household finances in a detailed, color-coded spreadsheet, most hiring managers would love to know that because it says something about the kind of attention to detail you’d bring to the job. That’s not something you could put on your résumé, but it can go in your cover letter.

Or maybe your last boss told you that you were the most accurate data processor she’d ever seen, or came to rely on you as her go-to person whenever a lightning-fast rewrite was needed. Maybe your co-workers called you “the client whisperer” because of your skill in calming upset clients. Maybe you’re regularly sought out by more senior staff to help problem-solve, or you find immense satisfaction in bringing order to chaos. Those sorts of details illustrate what you bring to the job in a different way than your résumé does, and they belong in your cover letter.

If you’re still stumped, pretend you’re writing an email to a friend about why you’d be great at the job. You probably wouldn’t do that by stiffly reciting your work history, right? You’d talk about what you’re good at and how you’d approach the work. That’s what you want here.

You don’t need a creative opening line.

If you think you need to open the letter with something creative or catchy, I am here to tell you that you don’t. Just be simple and straightforward:

• “I’m writing to apply for your X position.”

• “I’d love to be considered for your X position.”

• “I’m interested in your X position because …”

• “I’m excited to apply for your X position.”

That’s it! Straightforward is fine — better, even, if the alternative is sounding like an aggressive salesperson.

Show, don’t tell.

A lot of cover letters assert that the person who wrote it would excel at the job or announce that the applicant is a skillful engineer or a great communicator or all sorts of other subjective superlatives. That’s wasted space — the hiring manager has no reason to believe it, and so many candidates claim those things about themselves that most managers ignore that sort of self-assessment entirely. So instead of simply declaring that you’re great at X (whatever X is), your letter should demonstrate that. And the way you do that is by describing accomplishments and experiences that illustrate it.

Here’s a concrete example taken from one extraordinarily effective cover-letter makeover that I saw. The candidate had originally written, “I offer exceptional attention to detail, highly developed communication skills, and a talent for managing complex projects with a demonstrated ability to prioritize and multitask.” That’s pretty boring and not especially convincing, right? (This is also exactly how most people’s cover letters read.)

In her revised version, she wrote this instead:

“In addition to being flexible and responsive, I’m also a fanatic for details — particularly when it comes to presentation. One of my recent projects involved coordinating a 200-page grant proposal: I proofed and edited the narratives provided by the division head, formatted spreadsheets, and generally made sure that every line was letter-perfect and that the entire finished product conformed to the specific guidelines of the RFP. (The result? A five-year, $1.5 million grant award.) I believe in applying this same level of attention to detail to tasks as visible as prepping the materials for a top-level meeting and as mundane as making sure the copier never runs out of paper.”

That second version is so much more compelling and interesting — and makes me believe that she really is great with details.

If there’s anything unusual or confusing about your candidacy, address it in the letter.

Your cover letter is your chance to provide context for things that otherwise might seem confusing or less than ideal to a hiring manager. For example, if you’re overqualified for the position but are excited about it anyway, or if you’re a bit underqualified but have reason to think you could excel at the job, address that up front. Or if your background is in a different field but you’re actively working to move into this one, say so, talk about why, and explain how your experience will translate. Or if you’re applying for a job across the country from where you live because you’re hoping to relocate to be closer to your family, let them know that.

If you don’t provide that kind of context, it’s too easy for a hiring manager to decide you’re the wrong fit or applying to everything you see or don’t understand the job description and put you in the “no” pile. A cover letter gives you a chance to say, “No, wait — here’s why this could be a good match.”

Keep the tone warm and conversational.

While there are some industries that prize formal-sounding cover letters — like law — in most fields, yours will stand out if it’s warm and conversational. Aim for the tone you’d use if you were writing to a co-worker whom you liked a lot but didn’t know especially well. It’s okay to show some personality or even use humor; as long as you don’t go overboard, your letter will be stronger for it.

Don’t use a form letter.

You don’t need to write every cover letter completely from scratch, but if you’re not customizing it to each job, you’re doing it wrong. Form letters tend to read like form letters, and they waste the chance to speak to the specifics of what this employer is looking for and what it will take to thrive in this particular job.

If you’re applying for a lot of similar jobs, of course you’ll end up reusing language from one letter to the next. But you shouldn’t have a single cover letter that you wrote once and then use every time you apply; whatever you send should sound like you wrote it with the nuances of this one job in mind.

A good litmus test is this: Could you imagine other applicants for this job sending in the same letter? If so, that’s a sign that you haven’t made it individualized enough to you and are probably leaning too heavily on reciting your work history.

No, you don’t need to hunt down the hiring manager’s name.

If you read much job-search advice, at some point you’ll come across the idea that you need to do Woodward and Bernstein–level research to hunt down the hiring manager’s name in order to open your letter with “Dear Matilda Jones.” You don’t need to do this; no reasonable hiring manager will care. If the name is easily available, by all means, feel free to use it, but otherwise “Dear Hiring Manager” is absolutely fine. Take the hour you just freed up and do something more enjoyable with it.

Keep it under one page.

If your cover letters are longer than a page, you’re writing too much, and you risk annoying hiring managers who are likely sifting through hundreds of applications and don’t have time to read lengthy tomes. On the other hand, if you only write one paragraph, it’s unlikely that you’re making a compelling case for yourself as a candidate — not impossible, but unlikely. For most people, something close to a page is about right.

Don’t agonize over the small details.

What matters most about your cover letter is its content. You should of course ensure that it’s well-written and thoroughly proofread, but many job seekers agonize over elements of the letter that really don’t matter. I get tons of  questions from job seekers  about whether they should attach their cover letter or put it in the body of the email (answer: No one cares, but attaching it makes it easier to share and will preserve your formatting), or what to name the file (again, no one really cares as long as it’s reasonably professional, but when people are dealing with hundreds of files named “resume,” it’s courteous to name it with your full name).

Approaching your cover letter like this can make a huge difference in your job search. It can be the thing that moves your application from the “maybe” pile (or even the “no” pile) to the “yes” pile. Of course, writing cover letters like this will take more time than sending out the same templated letter summarizing your résumé — but 10 personalized, compelling cover letters are likely to get you more  interview invitations  than 50 generic ones will.

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COMMENTS

  1. Cover Letter for Internal Position & Promotion Examples

    Cover letter for promotion example. Although similar to a general cover letter for an internal position, a promotion cover letter differs in two key ways. First, a cover letter for a promotion specifically emphasizes your higher-level experience.For instance, if you're looking to land a managerial role, provide examples of management experience you've acquired as an employee.

  2. Cover Letter Examples for an Internal Position or Promotion

    Cover letter example for internal position (with referral) Dear Mr. Fields, At the recommendation of Angie Flores, Education Director, I would like to submit my application for the Membership Specialist position. I have had the pleasure of working under Angie's leadership for three years as an Education Program Coordinator.

  3. How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internal Position

    Cover letter for internal position example. To help you think about your internal cover letter, here is an example: Dear Ms. Moore, Thank you for talking with me about the open project manager position on your team. I've enjoyed watching your team's collaborative approach from my viewpoint as an executive assistant this past year and am ...

  4. Cover Letter for Internal Position

    Follow these steps to create a cover letter for an internal position: 1. Follow a standard cover letter length. Cover letters should average 250-350 words that span three to four paragraphs. If you submit a paper application, ensure that your cover letter is less than a page long using 12-point font. A shorter cover letter may not take full ...

  5. Cover Letter for Internal Position

    Keep it short. Cover letters should be brief and to the point. Typically, your cover letter should be around 250-350 words, which is under one page. Only focus on meaningful information to make your cover letter captivating. Your resume will contain additional information. Speak highly of your boss.

  6. Cover Letter for Internal Position or Promotion in 2024

    1. Create a professional internal cover letter header that will include: Your name and exact job title in the top left corner. The necessary contact information, such as your phone number and email address. Add the city and date right below your personal information.

  7. Cover Letters for a Promotion or Internal Position

    Alison Doyle. Updated on May 9, 2024. In This Article. What to Include in Your Cover Letter. Sample Cover Letter for Promotion. Email Job Promotion Letter. Applying for a Transfer. More About Getting Promoted. Photo: PeopleImages.com / Getty Images.

  8. Cover Letter for Internal Position or Promotion Examples

    We got you. Our cover letter for promotion comes from Alejandro, a junior developer in a software house, looking to progress to a normal developer position with more pay and perks. Example #2: Cover Letter for Promotion. Alejandro S. White. 4917 Yorkshire Circle.

  9. How To Write an Internal Position Cover Letter (With Examples)

    To write an internal position cover letter, follow these steps: 1. Explain the purpose of your cover letter. After you've addressed the recipient of your cover letter, state the position or promotion that you're applying for within the first line or two. You don't need to introduce yourself by name unless the recipient doesn't know you.

  10. Internal Position cover letter examples

    Write your cover letter in the body of an email/message. When writing your Internal Position cover letter, it's best to type the content into the body of your email (or the job site messaging system) and not to attach the cover letter as a separate document.. This ensures that your cover letter gets seen as soon as a recruiter or employer opens your message.

  11. How To Create A Cover Letter For An Internal Position

    When writing a cover letter for promotion, highlight the soft skills that you've learned, like communication, collaboration, and problem-solving skills. Show gratitude to your current manager as well as the hiring manager whose reading the document. Creating a cover letter from scratch isn't easy. We totally get it!

  12. How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internal Position

    5. Sign-Off: End the internal job cover letter with a professional sign-off such as "Sincerely" or "Regards", and your name. 6. Your Contact Information: If you are sending the cover letter for an internal position by email, include your contact information in the body of the email, as well as under your sign-off.

  13. How To Write a Cover Letter for an Internal Position

    Follow these steps to writing a great cover letter for an internal position: 1. Include a proper heading. It's important to maintain professionalism in your cover letter, despite applying internally. When you write the letter, include a heading with your name, your current role, your contact information, the date, the employer's name, their ...

  14. How to Write a Perfect Cover Letter for Internal Position

    A well-written cover letter for an internal position should include: A specific mention of the job you're applying for. A clear and concise summary of your qualifications and experience. Examples of your accomplishments within the company. An expression of your enthusiasm for the new role.

  15. Cover Letter for Internal Position or Promotion

    1. Write a strong introduction. Writing a cover letter introduction for an internal position differs from how you'd write one for a job at a different company. While you'd normally start a cover letter by giving your name and work history and outlining your qualifications for the job, the content of an internal cover letter introduction ...

  16. How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internal Position

    To help you think about your internal cover letter, here is an example: Dear Ms. Moore, Thank you for discussing your team's open project manager position with me. I've enjoyed watching your team's collaborative approach from my viewpoint as an executive assistant this past year. I am excited about the potential to merge my administrative ...

  17. How To Write A Cover Letter For An Internal Position Or ...

    Cover letter for internal position. In the case of a cover letter for an internal position or promotion, the hiring manager will very likely already be (at least somewhat) familiar with the applicant's background and experience, which makes it very important for the applicant to record details as truthfully as possible. Standard cover letter.

  18. How to Write a Cover Letter for an Internal Position (2024)

    Cover letter template for an internal position. The following is a template you can use to create a strong cover letter: [First name] [Last name], [Degree or certification if applicable] [Phone number] | [Email address] | [City], [State] [Postcode] [Date] [Organisation name] Dear [Hiring manager's title] [Hiring manager's last name], [Express ...

  19. Internal Comm Manager Cover Letter Examples

    [email protected]. Dear Mr. Sheffield, After reading your recent ad for the Internal Communications Manager I am writing to express my interest. As a highly skilled communications manager I bring focused editing excellent writing and the knowledge of how to improve business communication within organizational departments.

  20. Internal Audit Manager Cover Letter Examples & Writing Tips

    Show your passion for the job. Internal audit managers need to be passionate about their work in order to be successful. When writing your cover letter, be sure to show your enthusiasm for the job by using phrases like "I'm excited" and "I'm passionate". 4. Proofread your cover letter.

  21. Internal Communications Manager Cover Letter Examples & Writing ...

    Internal Communications Manager Cover Letter Example 3. I am writing to express my interest in the Internal Communications Manager position that you have posted. I believe that my experience and skills make me a strong candidate for this position. I have been working in the communications field for over 10 years, with a focus on internal ...

  22. How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

    If you think you need to open the letter with something creative or catchy, I am here to tell you that you don't. Just be simple and straightforward: , • "I'm writing to apply for your X ...

  23. Cover Letter for Internal Position or Promotion: Examples

    Two cover letter examples: a sample cover letter for internal position, and a cover letter for promotion. How to not trip up on the basics: the cover letter format. A quick and ready template to start from in minutes. Save hours of work and get a cover letter like this. Pick a template, fill it in. Quick and easy.

  24. 6 Great Front Desk Manager Resume Examples

    Prove your value as a Front Desk Manager with a sharply written professional summary. You can choose from expert-written content suggestions using our Resume Builder! ⚠️. 1. Enter the details about the job title you held. The builder comes preloaded with auto-suggested phrasing written by resume experts. 2.