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Second Conditional Sentences With Examples

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Second conditional sentences examples

Second conditional questions examples

Second conditional negative sentences examples

The second conditional is a type of conditional sentence that is used to talk about hypothetical or unreal situations in the present or future. It is called the second conditional because it refers to the second possible outcome or consequence of a hypothetical situation. The structure of a second conditional sentence is: If + past simple , would + base form verb Let's take a look at some examples to understand this better: Example 1: If I had a million dollars, I would travel the world. This sentence expresses a hypothetical or unreal situation in the present. It means that if the speaker had a million dollars, they would travel the world. However, since they don't have a million dollars, they are not able to travel the world. Example 2: If I were you, I would take a break. This sentence expresses a hypothetical or unreal situation in the present. It means that if the speaker were in the listener's position, they would take a break. However, since the speaker is not in the listener's position, they are not able to take a break. Example 3: If it rained tomorrow, we would stay indoors. This sentence expresses a hypothetical or unreal situation in the future. It means that if it rained tomorrow, the speakers would stay indoors. However, since they do not know if it will rain or not, they may or may not stay indoors. Example 4: If I had studied harder, I would have passed the test. This sentence expresses a hypothetical or unreal situation in the past. It means that if the speaker had studied harder, they would have passed the test. However, since they did not study harder, they did not pass the test. Example 5: If I knew how to play the guitar, I would start a band. This sentence expresses a hypothetical or unreal situation in the present. It means that if the speaker knew how to play the guitar, they would start a band. However, since they do not know how to play the guitar, they cannot start a band. The second conditional is used to talk about hypothetical or unreal situations in the present or future. It is formed by using the past simple tense in the if-clause and "would" in the main clause. We can see that the second conditional is often used in hypothetical situations, wishes, regrets, and suggestions. Click here for an exercise about making the Second Conditional.

Second Conditional Sentences Examples

1. If I had more money, I would travel the world. (I don't have enough money now, but in the hypothetical situation where I do, I'd travel the world.) 2. If she spoke Spanish, she would understand this song. (She doesn't speak Spanish now, but if she did, she'd understand the song.) 3. If they practiced more, they would be the best team in the league. (They don't practice enough now, but if they did, they could be the best.) 4. If you didn't eat so much junk food, you would feel healthier. (You eat a lot of junk food now, but if you didn't, you'd likely feel healthier.) 5. If he knew the truth, he would be very upset. (He doesn't know the truth now, but if he did, he'd be upset.) 6. If we lived closer to the beach, we would go surfing every weekend. (We don't live near the beach now, but if we did, we'd surf regularly.) 7. If she had a smartphone, she would be on social media all the time. (She doesn't have a smartphone now, but if she did, she'd likely be very active on social media.) 8. If it rained tomorrow, we could stay in and watch movies. (It's not raining tomorrow as far as we know, but if it did, we'd watch movies.) 9. If I were you, I would take the job offer. (I'm not in your situation, but if I were, I'd take the job.) 10. If they had a garden, they would grow their own vegetables. (They don't have a garden now, but if they did, they'd grow vegetables.) 11. If I owned a car, I would drive to work every day. (I don't own a car now, but if I did, I'd drive to work.) 12. If you studied harder, you would get better grades. (You don't study hard now, but if you did, you'd likely get better grades.) 13. If she liked spicy food, she would order the curry. (She doesn't like spicy food now, but if she did, she'd order the curry.) 14. If we had a dog, we would go for walks in the park more often. (We don't have a dog now, but if we did, we'd walk in the park more.) 15. If he played the guitar, he would join the school band. (He doesn't play the guitar now, but if he did, he'd join the band.) 16. If you watched that movie, you would understand the reference. (You haven't watched that movie, but if you did, you'd get the reference.) 17. If they knew how to dance, they would join the dance competition. (They don't know how to dance now, but if they did, they'd join the competition.) 18. If I had more free time, I would read more books. (I don't have much free time now, but if I did, I'd read more.) 19. If she wore glasses, she would see the board clearly. (She doesn't wear glasses now, but if she did, she'd see better.) 20. If you had an umbrella, you wouldn't get wet in the rain. (You don't have an umbrella now, but if you did, you wouldn't get wet.)

Second Conditional Questions Examples

1. If you won the lottery, what would you do with the money? (You haven't won the lottery, but I'm asking about the hypothetical situation where you do.) 2. Would you travel the world if you had the time? (You don't have the time now, but I'm wondering if that's the only thing stopping you from traveling.) 3. If you could live in any country, where would you choose? (You're not necessarily moving, but I'm asking about your hypothetical preference.) 4. Would he join the team if they asked him? (They haven't asked him, but I'm curious if an invitation is all he needs to join.) 5. If you knew how to cook, would you make dinner more often? (You don't know how to cook now, but I'm wondering if that's the reason you don't make dinner.) 6. Would she take the job if they offered a higher salary? (They haven't offered a higher salary, but I'm asking if money is the main factor in her decision.) 7. If we had a bigger house, would you want more pets? (We don't have a bigger house now, but I'm curious if space is the only thing preventing us from having more pets.) 8. Would you go skydiving if you weren't afraid of heights? (You're afraid of heights now, but I'm wondering if overcoming that fear would make you try skydiving.) 9. If they sold your favorite food here, would you come more often? (They don't sell your favorite food, but I'm asking if that's the reason you don't visit frequently.) 10. Would you study art if you had the chance? (You don't have the chance now, but I'm curious if opportunity is the only thing holding you back.) Here you can read more about questions in Second Conditional and find more examples.

Second Conditional Negative Sentences Examples

1. If I didn't have to work, I wouldn't be so stressed. 2. If I didn't know how to swim, I wouldn't go near the deep end of the pool. 3. If she didn't have a gluten intolerance, she would enjoy eating pizza. 4. If they didn't have a spare key, they wouldn't be able to get into the house. 5. If you didn't study for the exam, you wouldn't pass. 6. If it didn't rain so much, we wouldn't need an umbrella all the time. 7. If he didn't have a fear of heights, he would climb that mountain. 8. If we didn't have any allergies, we could eat anything we wanted. 9. If the car didn't have a flat tire, we'd be on the road by now. 10. If you didn't forget your phone at home, you wouldn't feel so disconnected. Here you can read more about negative sentences in Second Conditional and find more examples.

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Related Articles:

●  Third Conditional Sentences With Examples ●  First Conditional Sentences With Examples ●  Difference Between First and Second Conditionals with Examples ●  Difference Between Second and Third Conditionals with Examples ●  What are Conditionals?

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Exercise 3: Rewriting Conditionals

How can you express these ideas using conditional constructions?

Write your answers in the boxes and click 'submit' to see a possible answer for each question. There are many possible answers.

You may use I or you in your sentence, and choose the tense you prefer. Would any of these conditional sentences work, and mean the same, with a word other than if? Possible answers are given after each question, together with a reference to a number from the conditionals chart which gives more detail about the type of conditional used.

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First (FCE) B2 Key Word Transformations – Conditionals

By B2, learners taking an exam should be comfortable using conditionals, which is why we’ve designed 10 First (FCE) conditionals transformations. The key-word transformations activity, Use of English Part 4, is one of the likely areas that where you may encounter conditionals (they could also pop up in Use of English Part 2, the open cloze).

transformations conditionals

The important thing at this level is perfecting conditionals. You shouldn’t be stumbling around them or having to think carefully about the grammar. It should come naturally. What that requires is practice. Conditionals are formulaic to an extent, but also have certain flexibility which can be glossed over in grammar rules.

There are even more conditional transformations featured in the book 250 Key Word Transformations. They can be found alongside several other language areas, such as reported speech, dependent prepositions and phrasal verbs.

GET 250 B2 FIRST (FCE) KEY WORD TRANSFORMATIONS:

Types of Conditionals

There are five types of conditionals that a B2 student should be able to use comfortably. At more advanced levels, we can start to pick these conditionals apart, but for B2, make sure that you’ve got the basics covered.

Zero conditional – If I see someone eating, I get hungry – These conditionals describe situations that are always true. We use present tenses in both the conditional clause and the consequence.

1st conditional – If I pass my exam, I will celebrate – This is a real situation with a real consequence. The conditionals are based in reality, but the future consequence is dependent on meeting the conditional. We use present + future. Be careful with other conjunctions which can substitute if (e.g. unless, when, as soon as )

2nd conditional – If I had enough money, I would buy a house – Now we are discussing hypothetical situations. The conditional clause is an unreal situation with a corresponding unreal consequence. These can be either unrealistic situations or impossible ones. We use past tenses in the conditional clause and modal verbs for the consequence. B2 level is a good time to introduce 2nd conditionals with provided/as long as .

3rd conditional – If I had gone to university, I would have been more successful – This is where we start discussing the past. An unreal past condition with an unreal past consequence. To form this conditional, you need to use past perfect and a past modal.

Mixed conditionals – If I had made a sandwich, I wouldn’t be hungry at the moment – Mixed conditionals are a combination of the 2nd and 3rd. It’s an unreal past condition with an unreal present consequence. While they may appear confusing at first, mixed conditionals are actually quite common because we constantly lament our past and how it affects our present. Use the past perfect and a modal verb to form them. Note that mixed conditionals can also be flipped and have a permanent unreal situation with an unreal past consequence, but this is less common.

Learn about conditionals in even more detail with our post on real and unreal conditional sentences .

The materials

After you’ve covered the grammar and done a nice fun communicative task using conditionals, your students still need to practice seeing the grammar in an exam format.

Here, we have 10 transformations using conditionals. They have been designed to be challenging. I often find transformations with conditionals in course books are too easy, but these will force your students to push the limits of their grammar knowledge.

EXAM PART : Use of English Part 4 – Key Word Transformations

EXAM SKILLS : Using grammar appropriate to the level (B2), transformations

TIME: 20 minutes + feedback

PREPARATION: One copy of the worksheet per student

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2 thoughts on “First (FCE) B2 Key Word Transformations – Conditionals”

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Thank you so much ! Just saved me a lot of time. Really appreciate you. Jocelyn

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Great! Thank you! Material to practice is always welcome.

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Breakout English

English EFL

Conditional

Conditional type 1

Intermediate

The conditional type 1 refers to a possible condition and its probable result. These sentences are based on facts, and they are used to make statements about the real world, and about particular situations. We often use such sentences to give warnings. In type 1 conditional sentences, the time is the  present or future  and the situation is  real .

The  conditional sentences  indicate us  a possible condition  and  its probable result . It means  that the expected actions depends on a  condition .  If Clauses – Type 1  is used to  express a possibility  in the future  (It is not certain that it will happen, but it is possible). We use this type when talking  about  real  and  possible situations in the future .

In a conditional type 1 sentence, the tense in the 'if' clause is the simple present, and the tense in the main clause is the simple future.

  • If  I have enough money (if clause) , I will buy a car. (Main Clause)
  • If  we see her, we will tell her what the teacher said.
  • If  I go to the market, I will buy what you want.
  • If  I pass the exam, I will organize a celebration party.
  • If  you feel bad, you must go to the doctor.
  • If  I am not busy tomorrow,  I will help you.
  • If  he calls you, you should go.

As in all conditional sentences, the order of the clauses is not fixed. You may have to rearrange the pronouns and adjust punctuation when you change the order of the clauses, but the meaning is identical.

  • If it rains, you will get wet.
  • You will get wet if it rains.
  • If Sally is late again I will be mad.
  • I will be mad if Sally is late again.
  • If you don't hurry, you will miss the bus.
  • You will miss the bus if you don't hurry.

The conditional type 1refers to a possible condition and its probable result. These sentences are based on facts, and they are used to make statements about the real world, and about particular situations. We often use such sentences to give warnings. In type 1 conditional sentences, the time is the  present or future  and the situation is  real .

  • If I have time, I'll finish that letter.
  • What will you do if you miss the plane?
  • Nobody will notice if you make a mistake.
  • If you drop that glass, it will break.
  • If you don't drop the gun, I'll shoot!
  • If you don't leave, I'll call the police.

In type 1 conditional sentences, you can also use modals in the main clause instead of the future tense to express the degree of certainty, permission, or a recommendation about the outcome.

  • If you drop that glass, it might break.
  • I may finish that letter if I have time.
  • If he calls you, you should go.
  • If you buy my school supplies for me, I will be able to go to the park.

Course Curriculum

  • Zero Conditional 20 mins
  • Conditional type 1 20 mins
  • Conditional type 2 20 mins
  • conditional type 3 20 mins
  • Mixed Conditionals 20 mins

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  • Paraphrase the sentences to form Conditional type 2

Grammar Worksheet: Paraphrase the sentences to form Conditional type 2

  • Conditional sentenses — Second Conditional

Grammar Worksheet: Conditional sentences — Type 1 — Positive

Conditional sentences — Type 1 — Positive

Task: Put the verbs in brackets into the gaps. Form a Conditional sentence — type 1. Mind the position of the if-clause.

Grammar Worksheet: Conditional sentences — Type 1 — Negative

Conditional sentences — Type 1 — Negative

Task: Put the verbs in brackets into the gaps. Form a Conditional sentence — type 1. Mind the negations in the sentences.

Grammar Worksheet: Conditional sentences — Type 1 — Positive and Negative

Conditional sentences — Type 1 — Positive and Negative

Grammar Worksheet: Conditional sentences — Type 2 — Positive — Exercise 1

Conditional sentences — Type 2 — Positive — Exercise 1

Task: Put the verbs in brackets into the gaps. Make a Conditional sentence — type 2. Do not use short forms. Mind the position of the if-clause.

Grammar Worksheet: Conditional sentences — Type 2 — Positive — Exercise 2

Conditional sentences — Type 2 — Positive — Exercise 2

IMAGES

  1. Paraphrase the sentences to form Conditional type 2

    paraphrase conditional sentences

  2. Paraphrase the sentences as in the example to make Conditional sentence

    paraphrase conditional sentences

  3. 10 Examples of Conditional Sentences

    paraphrase conditional sentences

  4. Conditionals 1- 2 -3 practice on 3 pages

    paraphrase conditional sentences

  5. Ana's ESL blog: Conditional sentences in English

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  6. Conditional Sentences with types, structures, and examples and PDF

    paraphrase conditional sentences

VIDEO

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  2. The best way to paraphrase your sentence in English #english

  3. Metaphrase Paraphrase Imitation In Hindi Explanation In Translation Studies ENGSEC205 HPU

  4. Conditional Sentences

  5. Paraphrase Meaning

  6. ParaPhrase & Technique of Creating own sentence

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  1. Paraphrasing Tool

    QuillBot's Paraphraser helps you write better, faster, and smarter. Our rewording tool is free and easy to use—with just the click of a button, the paraphrasing tool will rephrase your sentence, paragraph, essay, or article to your liking, with many options available to customize and perfect the reworded text. 😍 Improves.

  2. Paraphrase the sentences to form Conditional type 2 or type 3

    Paraphrase the sentences as in the example to make Conditional sentence — type 2 or type 3. Do not use short forms. Mind the punctuation. Show example. 1. He does not know English, so he can not get a better job. If he knew English, he could get a better job. 2. She did not go to school yesterday, so she did not meet her friends there.

  3. Conditional Sentences

    Rewrite and paraphrase texts instantly with our AI-powered paraphrasing tool. Try for free. ... 2023 by Eoghan Ryan. Revised on September 11, 2023. A conditional sentence refers to a hypothetical situation and its possible consequence. Conditional sentences always contain a subordinate clause that expresses a condition ...

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  5. 50 Examples Second Conditional Sentences

    Second Conditional Sentences Examples. 1. If I had more money, I would travel the world. (I don't have enough money now, but in the hypothetical situation where I do, I'd travel the world.) 2. If she spoke Spanish, she would understand this song. (She doesn't speak Spanish now, but if she did, she'd understand the song.)

  6. Conditional Sentences

    A conditional sentence describes a hypothetical situation and its potential consequence.. Conditional sentences always include both a dependent clause (also known as a subordinate clause) and an independent clause (also known as a main clause). The dependent clause expresses a condition (e.g., "If I drink coffee"), and the independent clause describes the result of the condition (e.g ...

  7. Free AI Paraphrasing Tool

    Academic writing and research Ahrefs' Paraphrasing Tool can be valuable for students, researchers, and academics who need to paraphrase existing texts while maintaining the original meaning. It can help avoid plagiarism by generating alternative versions of sentences or paragraphs, ensuring academic integrity.

  8. Exercise 3: Rewriting Conditionals

    Possible answers using conditional type 6 (future time; advice): If you want to pass, you should do lots of practice. Supposing you want to pass, you should do lots of practice. You will pass, provided/providing that you do lots of practice. You will fail unless you practise. Practice will determine whether or not you pass. You should practise, otherwise you may fail.

  9. Paraphrase the sentences to form Conditional type 2

    Paraphrase the sentences as in the example to form Conditional sentence — type 2. Mind the punctuation. 1. I don't know Chinese, so I can't get that job. If I knew Chinese, I could get that job. 2. Richard doesn't understand what you mean, so he won't do the work properly. If Richard understood what you meant, he would do the work ...

  10. Paraphrase the sentences to form Conditional type 2

    Paraphrase the sentences as in the example to form Conditional sentence — type 2. Mind the punctuation. 1. They don't live far from work, so they don't use public transport. If they lived far from work, they would use public transport. 2. It isn't sunny outside, so children will not go for a walk. If it were sunny outside, children would ...

  11. First (FCE) B2 Key Word Transformations

    There are even more conditional transformations featured in the book 250 Key Word Transformations. They can be found alongside several other language areas, such as reported speech, dependent prepositions and phrasal verbs. GET 250 B2 FIRST (FCE) KEY WORD TRANSFORMATIONS: Learn more. Digital - €8.95.

  12. Conditional Type 1

    The conditional type 1 refers to a possible condition and its probable result. These sentences are based on facts, and they are used to make statements about the real world, and about particular situations. We often use such sentences to give warnings. In type 1 conditional sentences, the time is the present or future and the situation is real.

  13. PDF Rephrasing Practice 2: Conditional Sentences

    REPHRASING PRACTICE 2: CONDITIONAL SENTENCES. 1. We didn't see The Two Towers because the cinema was closed. 2. She doesn't understand because you haven't explained the situation to her. 3. You won't get a promotion if your work doesn't improve. 4. I never eat octopus because I get sick. 5. We didn't pick you up at the station because you didn ...

  14. Paraphrase the sentences to form Conditional type 2 or type 3

    Paraphrase the sentences as in the example to make Conditional sentence — type 2 or type 3. Do not use short forms. Mind the punctuation. Show example. 1. Kate doesn't work, so she doesn't have money. If Kate worked, she would have money. 2. We overslept, so we missed the bus.

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  17. 13 Conditionals rephrasing English ESL worksheets pdf & doc

    A selection of English ESL conditionals rephrasing printables

  18. Paraphrase the sentences to form Conditional type 2

    Conditional sentences — Type 2 — Positive — Exercise 1 . Task: Put the verbs in brackets into the gaps. Make a Conditional sentence — type 2.