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Second Step® Sample Lessons

Complete sets of materials from select Second Step curricula, the Second Step® Bullying Prevention Unit, and the Second Step® Child Protection Unit are available for Early Learning through Grade 8.

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Bullying Prevention Unit (Available for Kindergarten–Grade 5)

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__Lesson 18: Apologizing Can Help __

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In this lesson, students will learn about apologizing as a way of showing kindness and as a tool for problem-solving in a variety of scenarios. Lesson Plan (PDF) Lesson Presentation

Lesson 9: Feeling Frustrated

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In this lesson, students will learn which clues tell them when others might be frustrated, and a new way to feel calm when they’re feeling frustrated themselves. Lesson Plan (PDF) Lesson Presentation

Lesson 16: The Way to Say a Problem

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In this lesson, students will start learning to be better problem-solvers by managing strong feelings and stating problems without blame. Lesson Plan (PDF) Lesson Presentation Lesson Handout (PDF)

Lesson 14: Asking Questions

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In this lesson, students will learn about asking questions to find out how someone else is feeling and to understand what their friends might want or need. Lesson Plan (PDF) Lesson Presentation Lesson Handout (PDF)

Lesson 17: Saying It Respectfully

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In this lesson, students will learn how to consider another person’s point of view and to say what they want or need in a respectful way. Lesson Plan (PDF) Lesson Presentation Lesson Handout A (PDF) Lesson Handout B (PDF)

Lesson 17: When? Where? Who?

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In this lesson, students will learn how to identify when and where to work on solving a problem, and who should be included. Lesson Plan (PDF) Lesson Presentation

Unit 4, Lesson 23: Respectful Communication

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In this lesson, students will learn ways to communicate during a conflict to keep it from escalating through reflecting on their own experiences, defining respectful communication, and practicing using language that will help resolve conflicts. Sample This Lesson Lesson Plan (PDF) Student Handout (PDF)

Unit 3, Lesson 18: Practicing Positive Self-Talk

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In this lesson, students will learn how to use positive self-talk to reframe challenging situations, including discussing why it isn’t always easy to see the positives and practicing noticing the positive things in their everyday lives. Sample This Lesson Lesson Plan (PDF) Student Handout (PDF)

Unit 2, Lesson 10: Environmental Factors that Contribute to Bullying

Grade 8, Lesson 10 example

In this lesson, students will learn how the physical layout of and rules within a space can make bullying and harassment more likely to happen, from identifying environmental factors to discussing rules and regulations within their own school community. Sample This Lesson Lesson Plan (PDF) Student Handout (PDF)

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Bullying Prevention Unit

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Out-of-School Time

Available for Kindergarten through Grade 5 Explore samples from Kindergarten and Grade 1 below

Kindergarten–Grade 1

Unit 1, Topic 2: Facing Challenges with Confidence

problem solving lesson 9 7

In this activity from the Growth Mindset & Goal Setting unit for Kindergarten–Grade 1, kids learn three strategies that can help them work through challenges and then use those strategies to build a tower from 10 random items.

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CCSS Math Answers

Eureka Math Grade 7 Module 2 Lesson 9 Answer Key

Engage ny eureka math 7th grade module 2 lesson 9 answer key, eureka math grade 7 module 2 lesson 9 example answer key.

Represent each of the following expressions as one rational number. Show and explain your steps.

Example 1. 4\(\frac{4}{7}\) – (4\(\frac{4}{7}\) – 10) = 4\(\frac{4}{7}\) – (4\(\frac{4}{7}\) + (- 10)) Subtracting a number is the same as adding its inverse. = 4\(\frac{4}{7}\) + (- 4\(\frac{4}{7}\) + 10) The opposite of a sum is the sum of its opposites. = (4\(\frac{4}{7}\) + (- 4\(\frac{4}{7}\))) + 10 The associative property of addition = 0 + 10 A number plus its opposite equals zero. = 10

Example 2. 5 + (- 4\(\frac{4}{7}\)) = 5 + (- (4 +\(\frac{4}{7}\))) The mixed number 4\(\frac{4}{7}\) is equivalent to 4 +\(\frac{4}{7}\). = 5 + (- 4 + (-\(\frac{4}{7}\))) The opposite of a sum is the sum of its opposites. = (5 + (- 4)) + (-\(\frac{4}{7}\)) Associative property of addition = 1 + (-\(\frac{4}{7}\)) 5 + (- 4) = 1 =\(\frac{7}{7}\) + (-\(\frac{4}{7}\))\(\frac{7}{7}\) =1 =\(\frac{3}{7}\)

Eureka Math Grade 7 Module 2 Lesson 9 Exercise Answer Key

Eureka Math Grade 7 Module 2 Lesson 9 Exercise Answer Key 1

Exercise 2. Team Work! a. – 5.2 – (-3.1) + 5.2 Answer: = – 5.2 + 3.1 + 5.2 = – 5.2 + 5.2 + 3.1 = 0 + 3.1 = 3.1

b. 32 + (- 12\(\frac{7}{8}\)) Answer: = 32 + (- 12 + (-\(\frac{7}{8}\)) ) = (32 + (- 12)) + (-\(\frac{7}{8}\)) = 20 + (-\(\frac{7}{8}\)) = 19\(\frac{1}{8}\)

c. 3\(\frac{1}{6}\) + 20.3 – (- 5\(\frac{5}{6}\)) = 3\(\frac{1}{6}\) + 20.3 + 5\(\frac{5}{6}\) = 3\(\frac{1}{6}\) + 5\(\frac{5}{6}\) + 20.3 = 8\(\frac{6}{6}\) + 20.3 = 9 + 20.3 = 29.3

d.\(\frac{16}{20}\) – (- 1.8) –\(\frac{4}{5}\) =\(\frac{16}{20}\) + 1.8 –\(\frac{4}{5}\) =\(\frac{16}{20}\) + 1.8 + (-\(\frac{4}{5}\)) =\(\frac{16}{20}\) + (-\(\frac{4}{5}\)) + 1.8 =\(\frac{16}{20}\) + (-\(\frac{16}{20}\)) + 1.8 = 0 + 1.8 = 1.8

Exercise 3. Explain, step by step, how to arrive at a single rational number to represent the following expression. Show both a written explanation and the related math work for each step. – 24 – (-\(\frac{1}{2}\)) – 12.5 Answer: Subtracting (-\(\frac{1}{2}\)) is the same as adding its inverse\(\frac{1}{2}\): = – 24 +\(\frac{1}{2}\) + (- 12.5) Next, I used the commutative property of addition to rewrite the expression: = – 24 + (- 12.5) +\(\frac{1}{2}\) Next, I added both negative numbers: = – 36.5 +\(\frac{1}{2}\) Next, I wrote\(\frac{1}{2}\) in its decimal form: = – 36.5 + 0.5 Lastly, I added – 36.5 + 0.5: = – 36

Eureka Math Grade 7 Module 2 Lesson 9 Problem Set Answer Key

Show all steps taken to rewrite each of the following as a single rational number.

Question 1. 80 + (- 22\(\frac{4}{15}\)) = 80 + (-22 + (-\(\frac{4}{15}\))) = (80 + (-22)) + (-\(\frac{4}{15}\)) = 58 + (-\(\frac{4}{15}\)) = 57\(\frac{11}{15}\)

Question 2. 10 + (- 3\(\frac{3}{8}\)) Answer: = 10 + (- 3 + (-\(\frac{3}{8}\))) = (10 + (- 3)) + (-\(\frac{3}{8}\)) = 7 + (-\(\frac{3}{8}\)) = 6\(\frac{5}{8}\)

Question 3. \(\frac{1}{5}\) + 20.3 – (-5\(\frac{3}{5}\)) = \(\frac{1}{5}\) + 20.3 + 5\(\frac{3}{5}\) = \(\frac{1}{5}\) + 5\(\frac{3}{5}\) + 20.3 = 5\(\frac{4}{5}\) + 20.3 = 5\(\frac{4}{5}\) + 20\(\frac{3}{10}\) = 5\(\frac{8}{10}\) + 20\(\frac{3}{10}\) = 25\(\frac{11}{10}\) = 26\(\frac{1}{10}\)

Question 4. (\(\frac{11}{12}\)) – (- 10) – \(\frac{5}{6}\) Answer: = (\(\frac{11}{12}\)) + 10 + (-\(\frac{5}{6}\)) = (\(\frac{11}{12}\)) + (-\(\frac{5}{6}\)) + 10 = (\(\frac{11}{12}\)) + (- \(\frac{10}{12}\)) + 10 = (\(\frac{1}{12}\)) + 10 = 10 (\(\frac{1}{12}\))

Question 5. Explain, step by step, how to arrive at a single rational number to represent the following expression. Show both a written explanation and the related math work for each step. 1 – \(\frac{3}{4}\) + (- 12\(\frac{1}{4}\)) Answer: First, I rewrote the subtraction of \(\frac{3}{4}\) as the addition of its inverse – \(\frac{3}{4}\): = 1 + (- \(\frac{3}{4}\)) + (- 12\(\frac{1}{4}\)) Next, I used the associative property of addition to regroup the addend: = 1 + ((- \(\frac{3}{4}\)) + (- 12\(\frac{1}{4}\))) Next, I separated – 12\(\frac{1}{4}\) into the sum of – 12 and –\(\frac{1}{4}\): = 1 + ((-\(\frac{3}{4}\)) + (- 12) + (-\(\frac{1}{4}\))) Next, I used the commutative property of addition: = 1 + ((- \(\frac{3}{4}\)) + (-\(\frac{1}{4}\)) + (- 12)) Next, I found the sum of – \(\frac{3}{4}\) and –\(\frac{1}{4}\): = 1 + ((- 1) + (- 12)) Next, I found the sum of – 1 and – 12: = 1 + (- 13) Lastly, since the absolute value of 13 is greater than the absolute value of 1, and it is a negative 13, the answer will be a negative number. The absolute value of 13 minus the absolute value of 1 equals 12, so the answer is – 12. = – 12

Eureka Math Grade 7 Module 2 Lesson 9 Integer Subtraction Round 1 Answer Key

Eureka Math Grade 7 Module 2 Lesson 9 Integer Subtraction Round 1 Answer Key 15

Question 1. 4 – 2 Answer: 2

Question 2. 4 – 3 Answer: 1

Question 3. 4 – 4 Answer: 0

Question 4. 4 – 5 – 1

Question 5. 4 – 6 Answer: – 2

Question 6. 4 – 9 Answer: – 5

Question 7. 4 – 10 Answer: – 6

Question 8. 4 – 20 Answer: – 16

Question 9. 4 – 80 Answer: – 76

Question 10. 4 – 100 Answer: – 96

Question 11. 4 – (- 1) Answer: 5

Question 12. 4 – (- 2) Answer: 6

Question 13. 4 – (- 3) Answer: 7

Question 14. 4 – (- 7) Answer: 11

Question 15. 4 – (- 17) Answer: 21

Question 16. 4 – (- 27) Answer: 31

Question 17. 4 – (- 127) Answer: 131

Question 18. 14 – (- 6) Answer: 20

Question 19. 23 – (- 8) Answer: 31

Question 20. 8 – (- 23) Answer: 31

Question 21. 51 – (- 3) Answer: 54

Question 22. 48 – (- 5) Answer: 53

Question 23. (- 6) – 5 Answer: – 11

Question 24. (- 6) – 7 – 13

Question 25. (- 6) – 9 Answer: – 15

Question 26. (- 14) – 9 Answer: – 23

Question 27. (- 25) – 9 Answer: – 34

Question 28. (- 12) – 12 Answer: – 24

Question 29. (- 26) – 26 Answer: – 52

Question 30. (- 13) – 21 Answer: – 34

Question 31. (- 25) – 75 Answer: – 100

Question 32. (- 411) – 811 Answer: – 1,222

Question 33. (- 234) – 543 Answer: – 777

Question 34. (- 3) – (- 1) Answer: – 2

Question 35. (- 3) – (- 2) Answer: – 1

Question 36. (- 3) – (- 3) Answer: 0

Question 37. (- 3) – (- 4) Answer: 1

Question 38. (- 3) – (- 8) Answer: 5

Question 39. (- 30) – (- 45) Answer: 15

Question 40. (- 27) – (- 13) Answer: – 14

Question 41. (- 13) – (- 27) Answer: 14

Question 42. (- 4) – (- 3) Answer: – 1

Question 43. (- 3) – (- 4) Answer: 1

Question 44. (- 1,066) – (- 34) Answer: – 1,032

Eureka Math Grade 7 Module 2 Lesson 9 Integer Subtraction Round 2 Answer Key

Directions: Determine the difference of the integers, and write it in the column to the right.

Eureka Math Grade 7 Module 2 Lesson 9 Integer Subtraction Round 2 Answer Key 17

Question 1. 3 – 2 Answer: 1

Question 2. 3 – 3 Answer: 0

Question 3. 3 – 4 Answer: – 1

Question 4. 3 – 5 Answer: – 2

Question 5. 3 – 6 Answer: – 3

Question 6. 3 – 9 Answer: – 6

Question 7. 3 – 10 Answer: – 7

Question 8. 3 – 20 Answer: – 17

Question 9. 3 – 80 Answer: – 77

Question 10. 3 – 100 Answer: – 97

Question 11. 3 – (- 1) Answer: 4

Question 12. 3 – (- 2) Answer: 5

Question 13. 3 – (- 3) Answer: 6

Question 14. 3 – (- 7) Answer: 10

Question 15. 3 – (- 17) Answer: 20

Question 16. 3 – (- 27) Answer: 30

Question 17. 3 – (- 127) Answer: 130

Question 18. 13 – (- 6) Answer: 19

Question 19. 24 – (- 8) Answer: 32

Question 20. 5 – (- 23) Answer: 28

Question 31. 61 – (- 3) Answer: 64

Question 32. 58 – (- 5) Answer: 63

Question 33. (- 8) – 5 Answer: – 13

Question 34. (- 8) – 7 Answer: – 15

Question 35. (- 8) – 9 Answer: – 17

Question 36. (- 15) – 9 Answer: – 24

Question 37. (- 35) – 9 Answer: – 44

Question 38. (- 22) – 22 Answer: – 44

Question 39. (- 27) – 27 Answer: – 54

Question 40. (- 14) – 21 Answer: – 35

Question 41. (- 22) – 72 Answer: – 94

Question 42. (- 311) – 611 Answer: – 922

Question 43. (- 345) – 654 Answer: – 999

Question 44. (- 2) – (- 1) Answer: – 1

Question 45. (- 2) – (- 2) Answer: 0

Question 46. (- 2) – (- 3) Answer: 1

Question 47. (- 2) – (- 4) Answer: 2

Question 48. (- 2) – (- 8) Answer: 6

Question 49. (- 20) – (- 45) Answer: 25

Question 41. (- 24) – (- 13) Answer: – 11

Question 42. (- 13) – (- 24) Answer: 11

Question 43. (- 5) – (- 3) Answer: – 2

Question 44. (- 3) – (- 5) Answer: 2

Question 45. (- 1,034) – (- 31) Answer: – 1,003

Eureka Math Grade 7 Module 2 Lesson 9 Exit Ticket Answer Key

Question 1. Jamie was working on his math homework with his friend, Kent. Jamie looked at the following problem. -9.5 – (-8) – 6.5 He told Kent that he did not know how to subtract negative numbers. Kent said that he knew how to solve the problem using only addition. What did Kent mean by that? Explain. Then, show your work, and represent the answer as a single rational number. Answer: Kent meant that since any subtraction problem can be written as an addition problem by adding the opposite of the number you are subtracting, Jamie can solve the problem by using only addition. Work Space: -9.5 – (-8) – 6.5 = -9.5 + 8 + (-6.5) = -9.5 + (-6.5) + 8 = -16 + 8 = -8 Answer: -8

Question 2. Use one rational number to represent the following expression. Show your work. 3 + (- 0.2) – 15\(\frac{1}{4}\) Answer: = 3 + (-0.2) + (-15 + (-\(\frac{1}{4}\))) = 3 + (-0.2 + (-15) + (- 0.25)) = 3 + (-15.45) = -12.45

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Go Math Answer Key

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key Area of Circles

Refer to our Texas Go Math Grade 7 Answer Key Pdf to score good marks in the exams. Test yourself by practicing the problems from Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key Area of Circles.

Essential Question How do you find the area of a circle?

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 1

Finding the Area of a Circle

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 6

Question 3. Why do you evaluate the power in the equation before multiplying? Answer: Because the power refers to the radius only, not the number π.

Practice and Homework Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 7th Grade Question 4. A circular pool has a radius of 10 feet. What is the area of the pool? Use 3.14 for π. ______ Answer: r = 10 feet Use the formula for the area of the circle, cause the pool is circular. A = πr(r) 2 Substitute 10 for r, and 3.14 for π. A ≈ 3.14(2) 2 A ≈ 3.14 . 100 A ≈ 314 The area of the pool is about 314 feet

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 8

Question 5. Does this formula work for a circle with a radius of 3 inches? Show your work. Answer: The radius of the circle is 3 in. The circumference of the circle squared is equal to C 2 = 4π . A, where A represents the area of the circle. First find the area of the circle with the radius of 3 in. Use the formula for the area of the circle. A = π(r) 2 Substitute 3 for r, and 3.14 for π. A ≈ 3.14(3) 2 A ≈ 3.14 . 9 A ≈ 28.26 The area of the circle is about 28.26 in. Use the formula for the circumference when given the area C 2 = 4π . A Substitute 28.26 for A and 3.14 for π. C 2 ≈ 4 . 3.14 ∙ 28.26 C 2 ≈ 354.94 Root both sides. \(\sqrt{C^{2}}\) ≈ \(\sqrt{354.94}\) The circumference of the circle is 18.84 in.

Let’s see if we get the same result if we use the original formula for circumference Use the formula for the circumference of the circle. C = 2πr(r) Substitute 3 for r and 3.14 for π. C ≈ 23.14 ∙ 3 C ≈ 18.84 The circumference of the circle is 18.84 in. Hence, we can use both formulas for the circumference of the circle.

The formula works, so we can use both formulas for the circumference of the circle.

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Guided Practice Answer Key

Find the area of each circle. Round to the nearest tenth if necessary. Use 3.14 for π. (Explore Activity 1)

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 10

Solve. Use 3.14 for π. (Example 1)

Question 4. A clock face has a radius of 8 inches. What is the area of the clock face? Round your answer to the nearest hundredth. Answer: The radius of the circle is 8 in. Use the formula for the area of the circle A = π(r) 2 Substitute 8 in. for r, and 3.14 for π. A ≈ 3.14. (8 in) 2 A ≈ 3.14 ∙ 64 in 2 A ≈ 200.96 in 2 The area of the circle is about 200.96 in 2

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 19

Find the area of each circle. Give your answers in terms of π. (Explore Activity 2)

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 21

Essential Question Check-In

Question 11. What is the formula for the area A of a circle in terms of the radius r? Answer: A = r 2 π

Independent Practice

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 30

Question 16. Multistep A radio station broadcasts a signal over an area with a radius of 50 miles. The station can relay the signal and broadcast over an area with a radius of 75 miles. How much greater is the area of the broadcast region when the signal is relayed? Round your answer to the nearest square mile. Answer: We have to find the area of the signal that the station can relay, and the area of the signal that station broadcasts. The station can relay the signal over an area with a radius of 75 miles, so the area of it will be A 1 ≈ π(r) 2 Substitute 75 miles for r, and 3.14 for π. A 1 ≈ 3.14(75 miles) 2 A 1 ≈ 3.14 ∙ 5625 miles 2 A 1 ≈17, 662.5 miles 2 The area of the signal that the station can relay is about 17, 662.5 miles 2 . On the other side, the station broadcasts a signal over an area with a radius of 50 miles, so the area of it will be A 2 = π(r) 2 Substitute 50 miles for r, and 3.14 for π. A 2 ≈ 3.14(50 miles) 2 A 2 ≈ 3.14 ∙ 2500 miles 2 A 2 ≈ 7 miles A 2 ≈ 7,850 miles 2 The area of the signal that the station broadcasts is about 7,850 miles 2 . The area of the broadcast region when the signal is relayed, is greater for the difference between the area of the signal that the station can relay, and the area of the signal that station broadcasts. A 1 – A 2 ≈ 17,662.5 – 7,850 ≈ 9,812.5 miles 2

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 33

Question 20. Communicate Mathematical Ideas You can use the formula A = \(\frac{C^{2}}{4 \pi}\) to find the area of a circle given the circumference. Describe another way to find the area of a circle when given the circumference. Answer: The other way is to find the radius first Since C = 2πr, we have r = \(\frac{C}{2 \pi}\). After that, we can find the area by substituting for r in A = πr 2 . Determine the radius first with the formula r = \(\frac{C}{2 \pi}\)

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 14

Question 22. Multistep A bear was seen near a campground. Searchers were dispatched to the region to find the bear. a. Assume the bear can walk in any direction at a rate of 2 miles per hour. Suppose the bear was last seen 4 hours ago. How large an area must the searchers cover? Use 3.14 for π. Round your answer to the nearest square mile. _______ Answer: Determine the area the searchers must cover The radius of the area the bear walks is 8 miles since the bear was last seen 4 hours ago with the rate of 2 miles per hour A = πr 2 Write the formula for the area of a circle A = (3.14)(8) 2 Substitute the values A = (3.14)(64) Evaluate the exponent A = 200.96 Multiply the values A = 201 Round off

b. What If? How much additional area would the searchers have to cover if the bear were last seen 5 hours ago? Answer: Determine the area the searchers must cover. The radius of the area the bear walks is 10 miles since the bear was last seen 5 hours ago with the rate of 2 miles per hour. A = πr 2 Write the formula for the area of a circle A = (3.14)(10) 2 Substitute the values A = (3.14)(100) Evaluate the exponent A = 314 Multiply the values Determine the additional area the searchers need to cover 314 – 201 = 113 The searchers need to cover an additional 113 square miles.

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 H.O.T. Focus on Higher Order Thinking Answer Key

Question 23. Analyze Relationships Two circles have the same radius. Is the combined area of the two circles the same as the area of a circle with twice the radius? Explain. Answer: The combined area of the two circles, with the same radius, is twice the area of that circle. Use the formula for the area of the circle. A = the combined area A 1 the area of the circle A = 2 ∙ A 1 A = 2πr 2 The area of the circle with twice the radius is A = π(2r) 2 A = π2 2 r 2 A = 4πr 2 Hence, the combined area of the two circles with the same radius isn’t the same as the area of the circle with twice the radius.

Question 24. Look for a Pattern How does the area of a circle change if the radius is multiplied by a factor of n, where n is a whole number? Answer: If we multiply the radius by a whole number n, the area of the circle will be A = π(nr) 2 A = πn 2 r 2 Hence, the area of the circle will be n 2 times larger.

Texas Go Math Grade 7 Lesson 9.3 Answer Key 44

To find what part of the whole target is the bull’s – eye, we have to divide the area of the whole target by the area of the bull’s – eye. \(\frac{A_{1}}{A_{2}}\) = \(\frac{176.62}{7.06}\) = 25.01 Hence, the bull’s – eye is the 25th part of the whole target

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Homework And Practice 9 7

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Develop Good Habits

17 Fun Problem Solving Activities for Kids

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As a child, I would spend hours putting together puzzles… whether it was 3-D puzzles or figuring out a crossword. I also loved it when teachers would give the class an open-ended question and we had to work in groups to figure out the answer in our own way.

Even something as simple as playing checkers with my brothers gave me the chance to use strategy as a way to win the game. I honestly believe that it’s so important for kids to solve problems at a young age, as it helps them think critically and outside the box.

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So, Why Is It Important To Teach Kids Problem Solving?

I think these kinds of activities are so important for kids to do because it helps them learn how to think analytically and solve problems on their own. It's a great way to get kids to use their imaginations and be creative.

Rote memorization simply does not have the same effect. This type of learning is great for learning facts like historical dates, but it’s not going to help kids figure out how events in history happened and the results.

We take these problem-solving skills into college, the workforce, and travel . My ability to problem solve since childhood has certainly got me through many sticky situations while in a new city or country.

Additionally, problem-solving helps children learn how to find creative solutions to challenges they may face both in and out of the classroom . These activities can also be fun and used in cohesion with school or playtime.

17 Fun Problem-Solving Activities for Kids

1. marble mazes.

This activity was selected because it requires them to think spatially. Spatial learning will benefit kids when they start driving, riding a bike, playing sports,etc.

To do this activity in its simplest form, you will need a piece of paper, a pencil, and some marbles. First, draw a maze on a piece of paper using a pencil.

Make sure to create a start and finish point. Then, place the marbles at the start of the maze. The goal is to get the marbles from the start to the finish by tilting the paper and using gravity to guide the marbles through the maze.

Another example of a marble maze can involve using toilet paper rolls taped together to create a three-dimensional maze. The larger the maze, the harder you can make it.

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If you are not into the DIY method, you can always buy a toy maze on Amazon. A good 48 piece puzzle is the Melissa & Doug Underwater Ocean Floor puzzle.

2. The Tower Challenge

Building a tower gives kids the chance to think about gravity, structure, and balance.

To do this activity, you will need some building materials like legos, blocks, or even toilet paper rolls. The challenge is to see how high they can stack the materials without the tower toppling over.

This can be done individually or in teams. An activity like this is good for younger kids and is the building block to learning about harder topics like engineering.

3. The Egg Drop Challenge

The egg drop challenge helps kids learn how to engineer a solution that prevents something from breaking. It requires them to think critically about which materials will best protect something fragile like an egg when dropped from a height.

To do this activity, you will need some eggs and various materials such as straws, cotton balls, bubble wrap, etc. The goal is to construct a device that will protect an egg from breaking upon impact.

This can be done individually or in teams . Teams can even have a competition for the best egg drop device.

As children begin handling, shopping for, and cooking their own food, activities like this will help them understand how to handle breakable items like bottles, eggs, delicate fruit,.etc. Ideally, this is best for age groups 8 and up.

4. The Penny Drop Challenge

This activity was selected because it requires kids to think about physics and how different materials affect sound.

To do this activity, you will need a penny ( or another coin), a cup, and various materials such as paper towels, cotton balls, etc.

The goal is to drop the penny into the cup without making any noise. Begin by placing different materials into the cup and then drop the penny into it. The children should also drop the penny from different heights into the same material to see if/how the impact from a higher drop affects sound.

Group kids into teams or let them try it on their own.

Kids should make note of what type of sounds are made when the penny hits different materials. This is a great activity for kids who are interested in science and physics.

5. The Balloon Race Challenge

This activity was selected because it helps kids learn about aerodynamics and Bernoulli’s principle . It also requires them to think creatively about how to design a balloon-powered vehicle.

To do this activity, you will need balloons, straws, masking tape, and markers. The goal is to design a balloon-powered vehicle that can travel a distance of at least 10 feet. Kids can begin this activity by sketching out their designs on paper.

After they have a basic design, they can begin building their vehicle from various materials. Then kids can explain why they think the balloon traveled or did not travel as far as it did.

6. The Marshmallow Challenge

Marshmallows are not only delicious, but they are also soft and malleable. So kids can have fun using it for some construction projects.

This activity was selected because it requires kids to think creatively about how to build a structure using limited materials. It also helps them learn about engineering and work as a team.

To do this activity, you will need marshmallows and spaghetti noodles. The goal is to build the tallest free-standing structure possible using only marshmallows and spaghetti noodles. If you don't have spaghetti noodles, use something similar like pretzel sticks.

You may even want to establish certain rules like each team can only use a certain number of marshmallows or noodles. A time limit can also make it more fun and challenging.

For more fun activities, check out our post on problem solving exercises for team building .

7. The Balloon Pop Challenge

If you remember your childhood, you probably remember popping balloons for fun at times. But this activity is different because it requires kids to use strategy and critical thinking.

This activity was selected because it helps kids learn about patterns and problem-solving. It is also a lot of fun for kids who like popping balloons. The goal is to create a device that will allow them to pop a balloon without using their hands.

To do this activity, you will need balloons and various materials such as straws, string, paper clips, etc.

8. Picture Pieces Puzzle Game

As mentioned earlier, puzzles are a great pastime – especially in childhood. Kids must think critically about how to put the pieces together to create a certain picture. It also helps them learn about shapes, colors, and other concepts.

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You can take a medium to large picture and cut it into pieces. If you have younger kids, you may want to make the pieces larger. However, if you have kids closer to the 8-11 age range, you should be able to provide a challenge and make the pieces smaller.

9. Copy the Block Model

For this challenge, you can build a model out of blocks for the kids to copy. Put kids into groups and make sure each group has the same number of blocks you used for your model.

Make your model block as simple or complex as needed for your child's age group.

Set a time limit and make sure each group starts at the same time.

10. Team Scavenger Hunt

A scavenger hunt is great for kids because they have to search for items and use investigative skills. It is also a lot of fun and can be done both indoors and outdoors .

To do this activity, you will need to create a list of items for the kids to find. The items can be anything from common household items to things you would find outside.

These types of activities can also revolve around a theme like a holiday, movie, or book. For example, if the kids are fans of “Harry Potter” you can make a list of items to find that are related to the movie.

11. Obstacle Course

This activity requires kids to think creatively about how to get from one point to another while maneuvering around obstacles. If you have outdoor space, this can be done with common objects such as hula hoops, cones, etc.

If you don't have access to an outdoor space, you can use common household items to create an indoor obstacle course. For example, you can use chairs, blankets, pillows, etc.

Begin by setting up the course and then timing each child as they complete it. You can also have them race against each other to make it more fun.

Obstacle courses are also great because kids get to be physically active while they are thinking critically.

12. Reading Storybooks

There are many great benefits for kids that read storybooks.  One of the excellent benefits is the ability to problem-solve.  When they read the stories in the books, they see scenarios that cause them to be attached to the various characters they read about. 

So, when they encounter a real-life problem, it is often productive to ask a child how their favorite character would solve that problem.  Your kids can also be encouraged to come up with various options and possible outcomes for some of the situations they may encounter. 

This not only helps kids solve various problems but become more independent as well. 

13. Ask Them Open-Ended Questions

A good way to improve a child's ability to think critically and creatively and improve their ability to solve problems is by asking open-ended questions.  It also helps them to develop healthy personalities .

There are no right or wrong answers to these questions.  In addition, the solution requires more than a simple “yes” or “no” answer.  Furthermore, it allows kids to put some extra thought into their responses. 

Here are some examples of open-ended questions you may want to ask. 

  • What did this experience teach you?
  • Was this easy?  What was easy about it?
  • What this difficult?  What is complicated about it?
  • What may happen next in this situation?
  • How did you come to this solution?
  • What, if anything, would you do differently next time?
  • What can we do to make things more fun next time?

14. Build Various Structures with Toys

Whether wooden blocks, LEGO blocks, or engineering blocks… giving your kid blocks to build whatever their minds can dream up is fun.  In addition, it requires them to think about how they will make a structure, put the pieces together, and creatively ensure the building's function and design. 

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You may also want to challenge them to build something more complicated and watch them use their brain power to make it happen. 

15. Acting Out Skits

Impromptu activities like acting out skits help kids identify problems, develop solutions, and execute them.  This process works with multiple kids being divided into teams. 

First, you will want to write down different situations, such as resolving a disagreement between siblings or dealing with bullying on the playground on a piece of paper.  Second, you will fold the paper and place it in a hat or bowl.  

Third, each team will pick a scenario out of the hat.  Finally, you can give the kids a few minutes to discuss their solution and act out. 

16. Solving Moral Dilemmas   

In this simple game, you will help your kids solve simple dilemmas they may find themselves in.  You could write down a situation your child may find themselves in and help them learn the moral way to solve the problem.   

For instance, “The cashier gave them an additional $5 change back on my purchase.  What should they do?”  Another scenario could be, “I saw my friend cheating on a test.  Should I tell on them or let it go?”  A third one could be, “I caught my friends stealing some gum from the store.  What should I do?” 

After writing down the dilemmas and placing them in a bowl, get each child to select one and read it aloud.  Finally, you will help them devise morally correct solutions to the moral dilemma. 

17. Animal Pairing Game  

This is a fun and creative game to help your kids with focus, critical thinking, and team building skills .  In addition, this activity requires an even number of players to participate (4, 6, 8, etc.) 

Before starting the game, you will want to write the names of different animals twice, each on a separate slip of paper.  Then pass out the slips of paper to each individual or team member, instructing them not to share with anyone the name of the animal they received. 

Then the children will perform activities the animals might do without talking or making sounds.  Some of these activities might include:

  • The way the animal cleans or grooms itself
  • The way the animal sleeps
  • The way the animal fights
  • The way the animal eats or drinks
  • The way the animal walks or runs

The goal is for each child to successfully pair up with the other child who has selected the same animal.

How Problem Solving in Childhood Helps in Adulthood

Children are not born with problem-solving skills. It is something that needs to be learned and developed over time .

From babies who learn how to communicate their needs to toddlers who figure out how to get what they want, to children who are starting to understand the consequences of their actions – problem-solving is a process that begins in childhood and continues into adulthood.

Some of the benefits of teaching problem-solving skills to children include:

  • Improved critical thinking skills
  • Better decision-making skills
  • Enhanced creativity
  • Improved communication and collaboration skills
  • Increased confidence

There are many ways to teach problem-solving skills to children. The activities mentioned above are just a few examples. It is important to find activities that are appropriate for the age and abilities of the child.

With practice, children will develop these skills and be better prepared to face challenges in both childhood and adulthood.

Final Thoughts About Fun Problem Solving Activities For Kids

These are just a few ideas to get you started on teaching your child crucial problem solving skills. Perhaps they’ve inspired to come with some of your own, or seek out others? The important thing is to make sure the activity is age-appropriate and challenging enough to engage the kids.

Problem-solving skills are important for kids to learn because they can be applied to various situations in life. These skills also promote critical thinking, which is an important life skill.

There are many other problem-solving activities for kids out there. In time, you’ll find the ones that work best for your child.  And be sure not to forget about your own needs and self-improvement, both of which will make you a better parent and mentor. Here are some useful activities for adults to get your started.

Finally, if you want to level up your parenting skills, then check out this resource that will show you how to get your kids to listen WITHOUT yelling, nagging, or losing control .

problem solving activities for kids | problem solving activities for students | games that promote problem solving for kids

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  20. 17 Fun Problem Solving Activities for Kids

    4. The Penny Drop Challenge. This activity was selected because it requires kids to think about physics and how different materials affect sound. To do this activity, you will need a penny ( or another coin), a cup, and various materials such as paper towels, cotton balls, etc.

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