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Heidi Amin-Hong

Assistant Professor

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Associate Professor

Maurizia Boscagli Profile Image

Professor of English, affiliated with Feminist Studies and Comparative Literature

Julie Carlson

English Department Chair and Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature

Jeannine Marie DeLombard

Professor, Affiliated Faculty with Department of History

Patricia Fumerton

Distinguished Professor

Bishnupriya Ghosh

Professor of English and Global Studies

Prof. Yunte Huang

Professor of English and Comparative Literature

Cherríe Moraga

Professor, Robert and Lisa Erickson Presidential Chair in English, Director of The Global Latinidades Project

Sowon S Park

Associate Professor; Affiliate of Comparative Literature

ucsb writing faculty

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Cathy Thomas

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Writing Program - UC Santa Barbara

Student resources specific to the writing program.

  • Writing Program Undergraduate Advising  (Information for Incoming and Transfer Students)
  • Planning Your Writing Program Courses  (Overview of the Entry Level Writing Requirement, GE Area A1, and GE Area A2)
  • How to Complete GE Area A2 (After completing or receiving credit for Writing 2)
  • Professional Writing Minor  (Requirements Sheet from the Office of the Registrar)
  • Professional Writing Minor Application  (Typically due at the start of Fall Quarter)

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a. Law essay—10% b. Case brief—10% c. Memo—20% d. Letter—20% e. Appellate brief—30% f. Participation and completion of homework assignments—10%   Do not alter the font size or line spacing in order to change the length of the paper. Papers should be no longer or shorter than the length assigned and submitted on time. Use twelve point type, in Times New Roman or CG Times. Papers should be delivered to my mailbox in South Hall by noon on the date due or in class the same day. Late papers will result in grade reductions. Never submit a paper without proofreading it carefully. Your classmates and your instructor depend on your presence in class and your full participation. Participation therefore counts for a substantial part of your grade. University regulations regarding plagiarism will be strictly enforced.

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Writing Program

Writing Program Division of Humanities and Fine Arts South Hall 1401, 1510-1523 and Girvetz 1306-1325 (Faculty Offices) South Hall 3400 Suite (Advising & Administrative Offices) Telephone: (805) 893-2613 Email: [email protected] Website: www.writing.ucsb.edu Program Director: Linda Adler-Kassner, Ph.D.

The UCSB Writing program offers lower- and upper-division general education writing classes, as well as a Professional Writing minor. The goal of the Writing Program’s lower- and upper-division courses is to foster students’ abilities to contribute, in writing, to ongoing work in academic disciplines, professional contexts, and public life.

In lower-division classes, students learn to analyze the expectations of academic audiences in the university and to develop critical thinking, writing, reading, and research strategies to meet those expectations. Lower-division courses include Writing 1 (Approaches to Academic Writing), which fulfills the Entry Level Writing Requirement; Writing 2 (Academic Writing), Writing 2E (for students in the College of Engineering), and Writing 2LK (sections of Writing 2 linked to large lecture courses), all of which fulfill the General Education Area A1 requirement; and Writing 50 (Writing and the Research Process), which fulfills the General Education Area A2 requirement.

In upper-division courses, students focus on developing critical writing, reading, research, and analysis within more focused contexts. All upper-division courses fulfill the General Education Area A2 requirement. The Writing Program offers a variety of upper-division courses within three broad categories:

Writing 105 courses focus on analysis of and practice with interdisciplinary academic writing. Courses include Multimedia Writing, Grammar and Stylistics, and Writing and Rhetoric.

Writing 107 courses focus on analysis of and practice with professional and technical writing. Courses include Business and Administrative Writing, Writing for Accounting, Magazine Writing, and Technical Writing.

Writing 109 courses focus on analysis of and practice with writing in specific disciplines. Courses include Writing for the Social Sciences, Writing for Environmental Studies, and Writing for the Visual Arts.

The Writing Program also offers a Professional Writing minor. In the minor, UCSB undergraduates expand their abilities to communicate in diverse contexts in two capstone courses and a writing internship during their senior year.

Please visit the department website at www.writing.ucsb.edu for up to date information about the Writing Program. 

All provisions herein are subject to change without notice. Copyright © 2011 The Regents of the University of California, All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use / Accessibility / Last Modified January 23, 2015 12:19 PM PDT / Questions or Comments? Please email us

  • Affiliated Faculty
  • Graduate Students

ucsb writing faculty

Alenda Y. Chang

Associate Professor

Research Interests

  • Environmental Media
  • Digital Technology

ucsb writing faculty

Allison Anders

Distinguished Professor

  • Film Production

ucsb writing faculty

Allison Ross

  • Queer Theory
  • Documentary Studies
  • Phenomenology
  • Narrative Studies

ucsb writing faculty

Althea Wasow

Assistant Professor

  • Silent Cinema
  • Precinematic Visual Culture
  • Black Studies
  • Theory and Practice
  • Avant Garde
  • Critical Carceral Studies

ucsb writing faculty

Anna Brusutti

Continuing Lecturer

  • Italian Cinema
  • American Cinema
  • Science Fiction

ucsb writing faculty

Bhaskar Sarkar

  • Global Media
  • Indian Cinema
  • Emergent Media
  • Risk and Media

ucsb writing faculty

Bill Steinkellner

  • Television Writing

ucsb writing faculty

Charles Wolfe

  • Film History
  • Historiography
  • Silent Comedy
  • Documentary Media
  • Art and Politics

ucsb writing faculty

Cheri Steinkellner

ucsb writing faculty

Chris Jenkins

Head of Production

  • Documentary Production
  • Cinematography
  • Live-action

ucsb writing faculty

Constance Penley

  • Feminist Theory
  • Porn Studies
  • Fan Studies
  • Contemporary Art Practice
  • Science and Technology Studies

ucsb writing faculty

Cristina Venegas

  • Media and History
  • Latin American Cinema
  • Internet and Historiography
  • Digital Media

ucsb writing faculty

Dana Driskel

Studio Professor

  • Silent Film History
  • Archival Science

ucsb writing faculty

Greg Siegel

  • Media History
  • Media Theory
  • Cultural Theory
  • Critical Theory
  • Sound Studies

ucsb writing faculty

Ian Kellett

  • Cultural Activism
  • Environmental Design
  • Science and Technology Environment

ucsb writing faculty

James McNamara

Lecturer in Film & Media Studies

  • Adaptation Studies
  • Television Narrative
  • Medical Humanities
  • Gothic Horror

ucsb writing faculty

Janet Walker

  • Documentary
  • Trauma Studies
  • Media and Environment
  • Spatial Media

ucsb writing faculty

Jennifer Holt

Associate Professor, Department Chair

  • Media Industries
  • Policy and Regulation
  • Media Infrastructures
  • History and Historiography

ucsb writing faculty

Laila Shereen Sakr

Associate Professor, Director of Undergraduate Studies

  • Art Practice
  • Glitch Theory
  • Data Science
  • Middle East Studies
  • postcolonialism and Globalization

ucsb writing faculty

  • Satellite Technologies
  • Media Globalization
  • Surveillance
  • Digital Cultures
  • Television Studies

ucsb writing faculty

Michael Miner

  • Screenwriting
  • Modern Narrative

ucsb writing faculty

Mona Damluji

  • Energy Humanities
  • Urban Studies
  • Cultural Studies

ucsb writing faculty

Naoki Yamamoto

Associate Professor, Director of Graduate Studies

  • Film Theory
  • Asian Cinema
  • Avant Garde Art
  • Japanese Culture

ucsb writing faculty

Patrice Petro

Distinguished Professor and Dick Wolf Director of the Carsey-Wolf Center; Presidential Chair in Media Studies

ucsb writing faculty

Peter Bloom

  • Early Media
  • Ethnography
  • African Studies
  • Francophone Studies
  • Narrative Theory
  • Third Cinema
  • British Radio

ucsb writing faculty

Ross Melnick

  • Film Exhibition
  • Archival Theory
  • Global Hollywood
  • Media Journalism

ucsb writing faculty

Sara Caldwell

ucsb writing faculty

Sasha Razor

ucsb writing faculty

Sven Holcomb

ucsb writing faculty

Wendy Eley Jackson

  • Basic Screenwriting
  • Advanced Screenwriting for Television
  • Contemporary Screenwriters
  • Film and as Literature
  • Crew Production
  • Documentary Filmmaking
  • Race and Gender on the American Screen
  • Creative Writing
  • Documentary Activism

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Faculty Grant and Fellowship Writing Seminars

17 apr faculty grant and fellowship writing seminars.

Thursdays: April 17, May 1, May 15, May 29 12:00pm-2:00pm (lunch included) Education Building Board Room, 4th floor

The seminar will provide a systematic and detailed explanation of the grant writing process, including interactive workshops on best practices for generating research proposal ideas, writing strategies, and composing the key sections of a proposal.  A mock review panel will be scheduled for review of the resulting proposals. The seminars will help faculty members write proposals in a supportive and collegial setting, and better understand the typical review process at funding agencies and foundations.

Past attendees of this seminar series have had a 61% success rate with getting their proposals funded!

You must submit your application to attend this seminar series by Friday, March 28 at 5:00 PM .

More information and the online application form can be found here: http://www.isber.ucsb.edu/workshops

Memos to Campus

  • Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor
  • Communications

On behalf of Madeleine Sorapure - Discovery seminar proposals for Fall 2024

March 14, 2024

This message is distributed to Senate Faculty and Unit 18 Faculty. ( Click here to view description of distribution groups .) The following is being sent on behalf of Madeleine Sorapure, Teaching Professor-Writing Program and Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education ********************************************************************************

Dear Faculty Colleagues,

We’re writing with the call for Fall 2024 Discovery Seminar proposals. For Fall we will have a couple of different deadlines to submit a proposal. For the best room priority placement in a General Assignment Room, and for desired day and time, please submit proposals by Monday March 18th . The next deadline will be Monday June 17th ; we will review proposals after that date and schedule as we are able.

Discovery Seminars are one- or two-unit, P/NP, small group courses that facilitate student-faculty contact, promote valuable intellectual discourse in a seminar setting, introduce students to subjects that UCSB faculty care about, and explore how faculty study these subjects.

Senate faculty, Unit 18 faculty, and Continuing or Senior Continuing Unit 18 faculty are eligible to teach Discovery Seminars. They are taught above the faculty’s regular workload and compensated with research funds, as described below.

We encourage proposals that:

  • introduce students to current areas of faculty interest and research
  • enable students to learn about strategies for navigating UCSB disciplines and courses
  • provide opportunities for students to become oriented to and study the physical surroundings of the campus
  • include intentional strategies for students to get to know other students to build networks.

Starting Fall 2023 our First-Year Discovery & Discovery+ Seminars will have new course numbers. In your proposal, you’ll select one of three Discovery Seminar types:

Discovery Seminars for First-Year Students: INT 86AA-ZZ (previously INT 94) These one-unit lower-division seminars meet for one hour each week. The seminars are limited to 20 students, or 11 students if a field trip is involved.

Discovery Seminars for Transfer Students: INT 186AA-ZZ These one-unit upper-division seminars meet for one hour each week and are designed for transfer students who have established an interest in certain disciplines and subjects. The seminars are limited to 20 students, or 11 students if a field trip is involved.

Discovery+ Seminars: INT 87AA-ZZ or 187AA-ZZ (previously INT 89) These two-unit seminars meet for two hours each week; they are lower-division courses for first-year students and upper-division courses for transfer students. Discovery+ Seminars are taught by two faculty members in the same discipline or in different disciplines, and they explore a theme or a subject from multiple perspectives. The seminars typically enroll 40 students, although some may have lower enrollments. (Instructors co-teaching should have an active academic appointment in the quarter the proposed INT seminar is being offered.)

Faculty will receive research/professional development funding for teaching Discovery Seminars:

  • $1500 for one-unit Discovery Seminars for First-Year and Transfer Students
  • $2000 for two-unit Discovery+ Seminars with 30 students
  • $3000 for two-unit Discovery+ Seminars with 40 students

In addition, faculty will receive $300 in course support funds to pay for expenses associated with the course, including copies, handouts, videos for class, transportation on a field trip, museum admission, etc. Any funds not spent on the course can be used as research funds.

To propose a Discovery Seminar, go to: https://forms.gle/tyQ3CahG52b3Mtqh6

You can find more information about the seminars here: https://duels.ucsb.edu/academics/seminars/about

If you have questions or would like to brainstorm possibilities for seminars, I’d be happy to talk with you!

Best, Madeleine

--- Madeleine Sorapure Teaching Professor, Writing Program Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education UC Santa Barbara pronouns: she/her/hers

I acknowledge the traditional custodians of the land upon which the University of California, Santa Barbara is located and pay my respect to the Chumash Elders past, present and future.

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Chris Erdman to join the Classics faculty at Wash U

Chris Erdman (PhD ’24) will join the Department of Classics at Washington University in St. Louis as an Assistant Professor this fall. Chris has spent the year in Rome at the American Academy as a Rome Prize Fellow. He is currently finishing a groundbreaking dissertation (supervised by Robert Morstein-Marx) on voting culture in the Roman Republic. His article “The ‘Ballot Questions’ of Roman Republican Legislative Assemblies” is forthcoming in Historia . Congratulations, Professor Erdman!

Diversity Statement

The Department of Classics is committed to promoting excellence through diversity and inclusiveness. In keeping with the academic mission of the University of California to educate its residents, we strive to create an environment that is welcoming for all sectors of our state’s diverse population and that is conducive to the development of each individual’s highest potential. In addition, the Department upholds the principle of equal opportunity for all since equal opportunity fosters the best conditions possible for the enhancement of research, creativity, innovation, and excellence.

Diversity Officer:  Sara Lindheim

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Creative Writing for Media

08 July 2024–11 July 2024, 10:00 am–4:00 pm

Student writing. Credits: Artem Varnitsin / Adobe Stock

Creative Writing for Media is a short course designed to enable participants to practice creative writing skills and apply these to a range of media.

Event Information

Availability.

This course will help you gain a basic introduction to key concepts in narrative theory. By the end of the course, you will have developed a main character, central theme, and the beginning of a narrative, as well as core story concept. You will be equipped with the tools to pursue you ambitions further and understand the differences and similarities in how narrative works in multiple media formats.  

Course content

Each day will feature a combination of teaching and practical exercises:

Day 1: Intro and character 

  • Introduce tutor 
  • Set expectations for the course 
  • Think about memorable characters 
  • Inspiration session 
  • Character as the seed of the story 
  • Defining a main character 
  • Getting to know your characters  
  • Ticks, mannerisms, traits, flaws, ideals 
  • Identifying dramatic need 

Day 2: Structure and dialogue 

  • Classic 3-part structure 
  • Story arc and beats 
  • Plot points and devices 
  • Themes as pivots and anchors 
  • Creating a logline and synopsis 
  • Show don’t tell 
  • Dialogue and movement 
  • Expository dialogue vs action dialogue 

Day 3: Writing technique and script formats 

  • Transitions, Reveals, Pacing 
  • Controlling the audience’s eye 
  • Writing a script 
  • Looking at different script-based media examples 

Day 4: Self editing and next steps 

  • Refining the opening chapter and synopsis 
  • Editing prose 
  • Creating a proposal pack 
  • Writer support networks 

Learning outcomes

This course will help you to:

  • Build a foundational understanding of narrative theory 
  • Have a practical demonstrable understanding of creative writing processes 
  • Get a taster experience of approaches to writing for different media. 

Course structure

The course is delivered mainly as a practical workshop with some lectures/discussion.

Certificates

You'll get a certificate of attendance on completing the course.

Costs and booking

Price per participant is £925 and it includes course materials.

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The city of Boulder and Boulder County will begin monthly siren testing on Monday, April 1, at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. The outdoor sirens, used for flash flood and tornado warnings, as well as other threats, will be audible in locations on and around campus. The series of testing will continue through August. 

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Writing Fellows Program for Pre-tenure Faculty

The Writing Fellows Program gives pre-tenure faculty members one course release and a budget of $1500 to advance a writing project (funds can be used to work with an editor, hire a writing coach or participate in a multi-day writing retreat at the end of the academic year). This is a cohort-based model of structured writing support, and the Fellows benefit from the guidance and colleague-mentors throughout the year. For 2023-24, Professor Amy Ginther will be the mentor for the program. More information about the program can be found  here .

2024-25 Cohort

2023-24 cohort, 2022-23 cohort, 2021-22 cohort.

Herbert Kroemer, Nobel winner who developed laser tech, dies at 95

The german-born physicist developed a new kind of semiconductor that became crucial to the development of cellphones, cd players, fiber-optic networks and other touchstones of the information age.

ucsb writing faculty

Herbert Kroemer, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist who spearheaded the development of a new kind of semiconductor, leading to Information Age advances at the heart of everything from bar-code scanners, CD players and cellphones to satellite communications and fiber-optic networks, died March 8 at 95.

His death was announced by the University of California at Santa Barbara, where he had been on the faculty for nearly 50 years. A statement from the school’s chancellor, Henry T. Yang, did not say where or how he died but credited Dr. Kroemer with “transforming UC Santa Barbara into a leader in engineering and materials science.”

A German-born researcher with a thick white beard and heavy skepticism of scientific authority, Dr. Kroemer was awarded a share of the Nobel Prize in physics in 2000 for developing semiconductor heterostructures, layered devices that proved foundational to advanced lasers and high-speed transistors.

He shared his half of the prize with the Russian physicist Zhores Alferov , who worked independently but in parallel to develop the devices; the other half went to Jack Kilby , a researcher at Texas Instruments who played a central role in the invention of the integrated circuit, or microchip.

Together, their work “laid a stable foundation for modern information technology,” the Nobel committee said .

Dr. Kroemer launched his scientific career at research labs in West Germany and the United States in the mid-1950s, shortly after the creation of the transistor. The device helped usher in the development of modern electronics, replacing the vacuum tube as an electronic switch and amplifier. Although it was typically built from a single material, usually silicon, Dr. Kroemer proposed creating a faster transistor using a kind of sandwich, or heterostructure, comprising different materials.

In 1963, he applied his heterostructure research to lasers, which had been invented just three years earlier but could work only at low temperatures and for short pulses. Dr. Kroemer developed a way to circumvent those issues, coming up with the basic principle of a device known as the double heterostructure laser, the foundation of the first commercial semiconductor laser.

The devices “are used worldwide in fiber optic networks and enabled the internet, transforming the world,” his colleague John Bowers, director of UC Santa Barbara’s Institute for Energy Efficiency, said in a tribute .

“It was a question of making something possible that without heterostructures simply couldn’t have been done at all,” Dr. Kroemer told the New York Times after winning the Nobel. Without the structures, he added, “there would be no CD players and no CDs,” along with no LED lights and countless other electronic devices.

Dr. Kroemer started out as a theoretical physicist — his first employer, a telecom lab run by the German postal service, insisted that he stay away from research equipment for fear that he would break something — and said that when he developed the idea of the heterostructure laser, he was interested only in the fundamental science behind the concept.

“I really didn’t give a damn about what the uses were,” he told IEEE Spectrum , the flagship magazine of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

But his bosses at Varian Associates, a Silicon Valley research firm, refused to grant him resources to develop the technology, “on the grounds that ‘this device could not possibly have any practical applications,’ ” he recalled in his Nobel lecture . Other researchers, including Alferov, went on to build and refine the first heterostructure lasers.

“It was really a classical case of judging a fundamentally new technology, not by what new applications it might create , but merely by what it might do for already existing applications,” Dr. Kroemer said in his lecture, calling for institutions to focus less on the question of what cutting-edge science might be “good for.”

“The problem is pervasive, as old as technology itself,” he added, noting that the double heterostructure laser “was simply another example in a long chain of similar examples. Nor will it be the last.”

The oldest of three sons, Herbert Kroemer was born in Weimar, Germany, on Aug. 25, 1928. His father was a civil servant, his mother a homemaker. Neither had a high school education, nor did they have much of an interest in science. Still, they sought to encourage Dr. Kroemer’s natural affinity for math, physics and chemistry, including by buying a roughly 20-volume encyclopedia for him.

Looking for additional reading material as a teenager during World War II, Dr. Kroemer went to the library twice a week, making his way through the science section and becoming fascinated by “the realization that from a small set of very fundamental laws one could draw very, very far-reaching conclusions,” as he put it in an oral history .

After graduating from high school in 1947, he enrolled at the University of Jena, where he studied under the physicist Friedrich Hund during the city’s postwar Soviet occupation. As the social climate became increasingly repressive, lecture attendance dwindled; some of his more liberal classmates vanished without explanation.

“You never knew whether they had fled to the West, or had ended up in the German branch of Stalin’s Gulag,” he recalled in an autobiographical essay .

While working for the Siemens company in Berlin during the summer of 1948, Dr. Kroemer decided to resettle in West Germany, getting a seat aboard a return flight of the Berlin airlift. He enrolled at the University of Göttingen and received a PhD in physics in 1952, writing his dissertation on “hot electron” effects in transistors.

Dr. Kroemer conducted some of his early heterostructure research at RCA Laboratories in Princeton, N.J., and settled in California in 1959, joining Varian Associates in Palo Alto. He moved there with his wife, Marie Louise, and their young children, including a 2-year-old daughter, Sabine, who drowned in a pool shortly after they arrived, according to a report in the local Peninsula Times Tribune.

His wife died in 2016. Information on survivors was not immediately available, but they had five children, according to IEEE Spectrum.

Dr. Kroemer joined the faculty at the University of Colorado in 1968 and moved to UC Santa Barbara in 1976, eventually holding joint appointments in the electrical and computer engineering department and the materials department. He received one of Germany’s highest governmental honors, the Grand Cross of the Order of Merit, in 2001, and was awarded the IEEE Medal of Honor the next year.

After receiving the Nobel Prize, Dr. Kroemer gained a burst of attention, which he largely tried to ignore. “You get a lot of invitations where you know darn well you’re being invited for decoration. Those I mostly turn down,” he told a UC Santa Barbara interviewer. “But there is one kind of invitations where I feel I can give back to society — invitations talking to students,” whom he spoke with at elementary and high schools.

“Society has been good to me,” he said, “and that’s one way I can return that.”

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IMAGES

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  5. FOCUS ON FACULTY:. Reinventing Oneself: Writing Program…

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  6. UCSB Writing Program Welcomes New Director

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  5. Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing Faculty Voices: Lidia Yuknavitch

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COMMENTS

  1. People

    Chris Dean teaches Writing 1, Writing 2, Writing in Community (105CW), Rhetoric and Writing (105R), Multimedia Writing (105M), and Writing for the Teaching Professions (109ED). [email protected]. Girvetz 1314.

  2. Writing Program

    Monday through Friday. 9am-12pm and 1-4pm. Office location. South Hall 3432. Mailing address. UCSB Writing Program. South Hall. University of California. Santa Barbara CA 93106-3010.

  3. Faculty Resources

    Office Hours. Calendar Reservations. UCSB WP letterhead. Writing 99 (lower-division Independent Study) - please view this PDF for a preview of the 99 form! Writing 199 (upper-division Independent Study) - please view this PDF for a preview of the 199 form! UCSB Writing Program New Course Proposal Form. Course Proposal Chart.

  4. Writing

    The UC Santa Barbara Writing Program is beginning a creative nonfiction initiative in which 19 students will work with faculty members to create multimedia stories about their COVID-19 pandemic experiences. Feb 10, 2022. ... UC Santa Barbara writing lecturer and former ballerina Ellen O'Connell Whittet spoke to over a hundred colleagues ...

  5. UC Santa Barbara General Catalog

    Writing Program Division of Humanities and Fine Arts South Hall 1401, 1510-1523 and Girvetz 1306-1325 (Faculty Offices) South Hall 3400 Suite (Advising & Administrative Offices) Telephone: (805) 893-2613 Email: [email protected] Website: www.writing.ucsb.edu Program Director: Linda Adler-Kassner, Ph.D.

  6. Faculty

    English Department Chair and Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature. South Hall 2607A (chair) or South Hall 2503. [email protected]. DeLombard, Jeannine Marie. Professor, Affiliated Faculty with Department of History. South Hall 2721. [email protected]. Douglass, Jeremy. Associate Professor.

  7. Writing & Literature

    The Writing & Literature students have a genuine passion for reading and writing. Students complete rigorous coursework in Creative Writing, Literary Study, and Writing Studies, with considerable freedom to design their own course of study. Students work closely under the guidance of a faculty mentor to create a publishable body of creative and ...

  8. Associate Positions

    Writing Program Associate positions begin with participation in Writing 501, Academic Writing: Theory and Practice, a 4-unit course that provides a foundation in composition and rhetoric theory and practice, as well as a grounding in the Writing Program's course content and pedagogical approach. While this is a Fall quarter course, it begins ...

  9. Curriculum Guidelines

    Formatting and Approval Guide for Curriculum Guidelines. Writing 1. Writing 2/2LK. Writing 50. Writing 105A-Z (all) Writing 105C. Writing 105CW. Writing 105G. Writing 105M.

  10. Resources

    Student Resources Specific to the Writing Program. Writing Program Undergraduate Advising (Information for Incoming and Transfer Students) Planning Your Writing Program Courses (Overview of the Entry Level Writing Requirement, GE Area A1, and GE Area A2) How to Complete GE Area A2 (After completing or receiving credit for Writing 2 ...

  11. Michelle Grue Appointed Assistant Teaching Professor in College of

    In July of 2020, Michelle Grue was welcomed as a full-time faculty member in CCS and the Writing Program and became an Assistant Teaching Professor at UCSB. Grue joined UC Santa Barbara in 2015 as a masters student in the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, earning her MA in Education in 2018. She continued in a doctoral program in the same ...

  12. UC Santa Barbara General Catalog

    Writing Program. Division of Humanities and Fine Arts. South Hall 1401, 1510-1523 and Girvetz 1306-1325 (Faculty Offices) South Hall 3400 Suite (Advising & Administrative Offices) Telephone: (805) 893-2613. Email: [email protected]. Website: www.writing.ucsb.edu.

  13. Search for Faculty and Staff

    If you are a UC Santa Barbara staff or faculty member wishing to update your directory profile, you can do so via Identity & Access Management. UC Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, California 93106 (805) 893-8000. Connect With UC SANTA BARBARA. TikTok; Twitter; Instagram; LinkedIn; YouTube; Facebook;

  14. Legal Writing

    Legal Writing. Writing 109L-Writing for the Legal Profession Instructor: James H. Donelan Tuesday, Thursday 8:00-10:05 Tuesdays, HSSB1232; Thursdays, Phelps 1525 Email: [email protected] 1319 Girvetz Hall Office Hours: Wednesday 9:00-10:00 or by appointment. Texts: Statsky and Wernet, Case Analysis and Fundamentals of Legal Writing.

  15. Program Requirement Creative Writing Specialization

    Department of English. University of California, Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3170. Contact. T 805-893-7488. F 805-893-7492. [email protected]. Main office hours [PST] Monday through Friday.

  16. Writing & Literature

    Supplemental Application Materials. Writing Samples: Please submit up to 10 pages total; submissions must include both creative writing and expository writing: for Example: 5 pages of poetry, short fiction, screenplay, etc., and a 5- page essay or analysis. Creative Sample: These pages do not need to be one continuous piece, but rather might ...

  17. Writing 109EC--Donelan

    Writing 109EC—Writing for Business Economics . Instructor: James H. Donelan TR, 8-9:15, Enroll Code: 45955. Meets Tuesdays in Girvetz 1119; Thursdays in Phelps 1526.

  18. A Brief Guide to Writing 2

    A Brief Guide to Writing 2. James Donelan. The Purpose and Content of Writing 2. Writing 2, the only course required of all undergraduates at UCSB, not only provides students with a fundamental understanding of academic writing, but also helps them with their reading and critical thinking skills. The course also recognizes the differences in ...

  19. Writing 109L--Writing for the Legal Profession

    Writing 109L—Writing for the Legal Profession. Instructor: James H. Donelan Tuesday, Thursday 2:00-3:15 HSSB 1232 Enroll Code: 54296 Email: [email protected] 1310 Girvetz Hall Office Hours: Tuesday 1:00-1:50, Wednesday 1:00-1:50 or by appointment. Texts: Behrens, Making the Case Ruszkiewicz, Hairston, Seward, SF Writer A reader at ...

  20. UC Santa Barbara General Catalog

    Writing Program. Division of Humanities and Fine Arts. South Hall 1401, 1510-1523 and Girvetz 1306-1325 (Faculty Offices) South Hall 3400 Suite (Advising & Administrative Offices) Telephone: (805) 893-2613. Email: [email protected]. Website: www.writing.ucsb.edu.

  21. Faculty

    Toggle navigation. Main navigation. Home; About; Student Life; Majors; Courses; Search

  22. Faculty

    Patrice Petro. Distinguished Professor and Dick Wolf Director of the Carsey-Wolf Center; Presidential Chair in Media Studies. Research Interests. History and Historiography

  23. Faculty Grant and Fellowship Writing Seminars

    Thursdays: April 17, May 1, May 15, May 29 12:00pm-2:00pm (lunch included) Education Building Board Room, 4th floor The seminar will provide a systematic and detailed explanation of the grant writing process, including interactive workshops on best practices for generating research proposal ideas, writing strategies, and composing the key sections of a proposal. A mock review panel will be ...

  24. On behalf of Madeleine Sorapure

    Dear Faculty Colleagues, We're writing with the call for Fall 2024 Discovery Seminar proposals. For Fall we will have a couple of different deadlines to submit a proposal. ... introduce students to subjects that UCSB faculty care about, and explore how faculty study these subjects. Senate faculty, Unit 18 faculty, and Continuing or Senior ...

  25. Chris Erdman to join the Classics faculty at Wash U

    Chris Erdman to join the Classics faculty at Wash U March 29, 2024; Richard Hunter is Visiting Professor from Feb. 26 to Mar. 1 February 26, 2024; Search for: Contact US. Department of Classics University of California MC3120 Santa Barbara, CA 93106-3120 Diversity Statement.

  26. Creative Writing for Media

    Creative Writing for Media is a short course designed to enable participants to practice creative writing skills and apply these to a range of media. ... IOE - Faculty of Education and Society; Creative Writing for Media; Creative Writing for Media. 08 July 2024-11 July 2024, 10:00 am-4:00 pm

  27. Faculty-Staff Edition

    Faculty-Staff Edition - March 28, 2024 . Campus Community . Breaking chains, forging community: Insights from the TRANSforming Gender Conference. Finding Community Campus Community. Unity and resilience were the themes of the TRANSforming Gender Conference, where attendees celebrated queer joy and explored gender identity and activism ...

  28. Writing Fellows Program for Pre-tenure Faculty

    The Writing Fellows Program gives pre-tenure faculty members one course release and a budget of $1500 to advance a writing project (funds can be used to work with an editor, hire a writing coach or participate in a multi-day writing retreat at the end of the academic year). This is a cohort-based model of structured writing support, and the ...

  29. Herbert Kroemer, Nobel winner who developed laser tech, dies at 95

    Dr. Kroemer joined the faculty at the University of Colorado in 1968 and moved to UC Santa Barbara in 1976, eventually holding joint appointments in the electrical and computer engineering ...