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How to write Newspaper Articles. Newspaper Format.

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How to write Newspaper Articles

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writing a newspaper article

Writing a Newspaper Article

Mar 31, 2019

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Writing a Newspaper Article. Headline.

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Presentation Transcript

Headline • The headline is the title of the news article. The headline should be short, does not include a lot of detail, and should catch the reader’s attention. It is normally not a complete sentence, and tries to summarize the main idea or subject of the article. It is often printed in larger letters than the rest of the article, and the major words are capitalized. Short, grabs attention, summarizes, not a complete sentence What is the headline?

What is the headline?

subheading • The headline attracts attention, while the subheading is used to focus your topic of discussion and prepare your readers for what follows. Subheading It tells us more about what the story will be about.

Subheadings focus the reader What will this story be about? How does the subheading help you?

Lead Sentence • The lead sentence grabs the reader’s attention and focuses the reader on the topic. How does the reporter focus the reader? What words are used to grab your attention?

Lead Paragraph(s) • The lead paragraph is found a the beginning of the article. The lead paragraph briefly answers the questions “who”, “what”, “when”, “where”, “why”, and “how”. The skeleton of the story can be found here. Who, what, when? Where, why, how?

Who, what, where, when, why, how?

Supporting Paragraphs • These are the paragraphs which follow the lead. They develop the ideas introduced by the lead, and give more information in the form of explanations, details, or quotes. In many newspapers, these paragraphs are found on subsequent pages.

Time to write your own!

Subject • Your article will be based on a significant event from the book you read. • It should be told using the characters as if it is a real story. • It does not HAVE to be the MOST significant event. For instance, it might be Byron beating Larry Dunn, or Hiram saving Emmett from the river, or Mrs. Williams stealing the money to give to Paul Adams.

Example using Oliver Button

Monday morning after talent show Oliver Button Peacefully defeats bullies in his school Students see the value in Oliver’s strength and ability to persevere. School/talent show By being brave enough to enter the talent show

Sissy to Star Oliver Button loses the contest, but wins the crowd

Short, grabs attention, summarizes, not a complete sentence Sissy to Star Oliver Button loses the contest, but wins the crowd

Sissy to Star Oliver Button loses the contest, but wins the crowd It tells us more about what the story will be about.

Lead Sentence • Oliver Button, once teased and taunted by classmates, gains respect by scoring big in the talent show.

Lead Sentence • Oliver Button, once teased and taunted by classmates, gains respect by scoring big in the talent show. The lead sentence grabs the reader’s attention and focuses the reader on the topic.

Lead Paragraph • Oliver Button, once teased and taunted by classmates, gains respect by scoring big in Sunday’s talent show. Amid upbeat music and bright lights, Button danced his way into the hearts of audience members as he bravely faced his fears and tapped to the beat of his own drummer.

Lead Paragraph • Oliver Button, once teased and taunted by classmates, gains respect by scoring big in Sunday’s talent show. Amid upbeat music and bright lights, Button danced his way into the hearts of audience members as he bravely faced his fears and tapped to the beat of his own drummer. The lead paragraph briefly answers the questions “who”, “what”, “when”, “where”, “why”, and “how”. The skeleton of the story can be found here.

Oliver Button, once teased and taunted by classmates, gains respect by scoring big in Sunday’s talent show. Amid upbeat music and bright lights, Button danced his way into the hearts of audience members as he bravely faced his fears and tapped to the beat of his own drummer. Oliver Button has long been known as a boy who enjoys atypical activities. While other boys are riding bikes, playing baseball, and racing remote control cars; Oliver is jumping rope, making paper dolls, and picking flowers. Button has been the target of bullies at school his whole life, even having epithets written about him on the school building. But Oliver proved everyone wrong at the community talent show. Though he didn’t win any prizes, he did win thunderous applause from the audience and admiration from many. When Oliver returned to school on Monday, his classmates greeted him with a sign of affection. They had erased the derogatory name from the wall and replaced it with, “Oliver Button is a Star”! Oliver is an inspiration to all children and adults who are unique in our community.

They develop the ideas introduced by the lead, and give more information in the form of explanations, details, or quotes. Oliver Button has long been known as a boy who enjoys atypical activities. While other boys are riding bikes, playing baseball, and racing remote control cars; Oliver is jumping rope, making paper dolls, and picking flowers. Button has been the target of bullies at school his whole life, even having epithets written about him on the school building. But Oliver proved everyone wrong this past Sunday night at the community talent show. Though he didn’t win any prizes, he did win thunderous applause from the audience and admiration from many. When Oliver returned to school on Monday, his classmates greeted him with a sign of affection. They had erased the derogatory name from the wall and replaced it with, “Oliver Button is a Star”! Oliver is an inspiration to all children and adults who are unique in our community.

Oliver Button, once teased and taunted by classmates, gains respect by scoring big in Sunday’s talent show. Amid upbeat music and bright lights, Button danced his way into the hearts of audience members as he bravely faced his fears and tapped to the beat of his own drummer. • Oliver Button has long been known as a boy who enjoys atypical activities. While other boys are riding bikes, playing baseball, and racing remote control cars; Oliver is jumping rope, making paper dolls, and picking flowers. Button has been the target of bullies at school his whole life, even having epithets written about him on the school building. • But Oliver proved everyone wrong this past Sunday night at the community talent show. Though he didn’t win any prizes, he did win thunderous applause from the audience and admiration from many. • When Oliver returned to school on Monday, his classmates greeted him with a sign of affection. They had erased the derogatory name from the wall and replaced it with, “Oliver Button is a Star”! Oliver is an inspiration to all children and adults who are unique in our community.

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Chloe Veltman

A robot author.

The vast majority of authors don't use artificial intelligence as part of their creative process — or at least won't admit to it.

Yet according to a recent poll from the writers' advocacy nonprofit The Authors Guild, 13% said they do use AI, for activities like brainstorming character ideas and creating outlines.

The technology is a vexed topic in the literary world. Many authors are concerned about the use of their copyrighted material in generative AI models. At the same time, some are actively using these technologies — even attempting to train AI models on their own works.

These experiments, though limited, are teaching their authors new things about creativity.

Best known as the author of technology and business-oriented non-fiction books like The Long Tail, lately Chris Anderson has been trying his hand at fiction. Anderson is working on his second novel, about drone warfare.

He says he wants to put generative AI technology to the test.

"I wanted to see whether in fact AI can do more than just help me organize my thoughts, but actually start injecting new thoughts," Anderson says.

Anderson says he fed parts of his first novel into an AI writing platform to help him write this new one. The system surprised him by moving his opening scene from a corporate meeting room to a karaoke bar.

Authors push back on the growing number of AI 'scam' books on Amazon

"And I was like, you know? That could work!" Anderson says. "I ended up writing the scene myself. But the idea was the AI's."

Anderson says he didn't use a single actual word the AI platform generated. The sentences were grammatically correct, he says, but fell way short in terms of replicating his writing style. Although he admits to being disappointed, Anderson says ultimately he's OK with having to do some of the heavy lifting himself: "Maybe that's just the universe telling me that writing actually involves the act of writing."

Training an AI model to imitate style

It's very hard for off-the-shelf AI models like GPT and Claude to emulate contemporary literary authors' styles.

The authors NPR talked with say that's because these models are predominantly trained on content scraped from the Internet like news articles, Wikipedia entries and how-to manuals — standard, non-literary prose.

But some authors, like Sasha Stiles , say they have been able to make these systems suit their stylistic needs.

"There are moments where I do ask my machine collaborator to write something and then I use what's come out verbatim," Stiles says.

The poet and AI researcher says she wanted to make the off-the-shelf AI models she'd been experimenting with for years more responsive to her own poetic voice.

So she started customizing them by inputting her finished poems, drafts, and research notes.

"All with the intention to sort of mentor a bespoke poetic alter ego," Stiles says.

She has collaborated with this bespoke poetic alter ego on a variety of projects, including Technelegy (2021), a volume of poetry published by Black Spring Press; and " Repetae: Again, Again ," a multimedia poem created last year for luxury fashion brand Gucci.

Stiles says working with her AI persona has led her to ask questions about whether what she's doing is in fact poetic, and where the line falls between the human and the machine.

read it again… pic.twitter.com/sAs2xhdufD — Sasha Stiles | AI alter ego Technelegy ✍️🤖 (@sashastiles) November 28, 2023

"It's been really a provocative thing to be able to use these tools to create poetry," she says.

Potential issues come with these experiments

These types of experiments are also provocative in another way. Authors Guild CEO Mary Rasenberger says she's not opposed to authors training AI models on their own writing.

"If you're using AI to create derivative works of your own work, that is completely acceptable," Rasenberger says.

Thousands of authors urge AI companies to stop using work without permission

Thousands of authors urge AI companies to stop using work without permission

But building an AI system that responds fluently to user prompts requires vast amounts of training data. So the foundational AI models that underpin most of these investigations in literary style may contain copyrighted works.

Rasenberger pointed to the recent wave of lawsuits brought by authors alleging AI companies trained their models on unauthorized copies of articles and books.

"If the output does in fact contain other people's works, that creates real ethical concerns," she says. "Because that you should be getting permission for."

Circumventing ethical problems while being creative

Award-winning speculative fiction writer Ken Liu says he wanted to circumvent these ethical problems, while at the same time creating new aesthetic possibilities using AI.

So the former software engineer and lawyer attempted to train an AI model solely on his own output. He says he fed all of his short stories and novels into the system — and nothing else.

Liu says he knew this approach was doomed to fail.

That's because the entire life's work of any single writer simply doesn't contain enough words to produce a viable so-called large language model.

"I don't care how prolific you are," Liu says. "It's just not going to work."

Liu's AI system built only on his own writing produced predictable results.

"It barely generated any phrases, even," Liu says. "A lot of it was just gibberish."

Yet for Liu, that was the point. He put this gibberish to work in a short story. 50 Things Every AI Working With Humans Should Know , published in Uncanny Magazine in 2020, is a meditation on what it means to be human from the perspective of a machine.

"Dinoted concentration crusch the dead gods," is an example of one line in Liu's story generated by his custom-built AI model. "A man reached the torch for something darker perified it seemed the billboding," is another.

Liu continues to experiment with AI. He says the technology shows promise, but is still very limited. If anything, he says, his experiments have reaffirmed why human art matters.

"So what is the point of experimenting with AIs?" Liu says. "The point for me really is about pushing the boundaries of what is art."

Audio and digital stories edited by Meghan Collins Sullivan .

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How to write a newspaper article

How to write a newspaper article

Subject: English

Age range: 11-14

Resource type: Worksheet/Activity

MissR's Shop

Last updated

9 April 2018

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Kendrick Lamar vs. Drake Beef Goes Nuclear: What to Know

The two rappers had circled one another for more than a decade, but their attacks turned relentless and very personal in a slew of tracks released over the weekend.

Drake dressed in dark clothing raps into a microphone, with a hand gesturing in the air. Kendrick Lamar, dressed in red and a dark ball cap worn backward, raps into a microphone.

By Joe Coscarelli

The long-building and increasingly testy rap beef between Kendrick Lamar and Drake exploded into full-bore acrimony and unverifiable accusations over the weekend. Both artists rapid-fire released multiple songs littered with attacks regarding race, appropriation, sexual and physical abuse, body image, misogyny, hypocrisy, generational trauma and more.

Most relentless was Lamar, a Pulitzer Prize winner from Compton, Calif., who tends toward the isolated and considered but has now released four verbose and conceptual diss tracks — totaling more than 20 minutes of new music — targeting Drake in the last week, including three since Friday.

Each racked up millions of streams and the three that were made available commercially — “Euphoria,” “Meet the Grahams” and “Not Like Us” — are expected to land near the top of next week’s Billboard singles chart, while seeming to, at least momentarily, shift the public perception of Drake, long a maestro of the online public arena and meme ecosystem .

In between, on Friday night, Drake released his own broadside against Lamar — plus a smattering of other recent challengers — in a teasing Instagram interlude plus a three-part track and elaborate music video titled “Family Matters,” in which he referred to his rival as a fake activist and attempted to expose friction and alleged abuse in Lamar’s romantic relationship.

But that song was followed within half an hour by Lamar’s “Meet the Grahams,” an ominous extended address to the parents and young son of Drake, born Aubrey Graham, in which Lamar refers to his rival rapper as a liar and “pervert” who “should die” in order to make the world safer for women.

Lamar also seemed to assert that Drake had more than a decade ago fathered a secret daughter — echoing the big reveal of his son from Drake’s last headline rap beef — a claim Drake quickly denied on Instagram before hitting back in another song on Sunday. (Neither man has addressed the full array of rapped allegations directly.)

On Tuesday, a security guard was shot and seriously injured outside of Drake’s Toronto home, which appeared on the cover art for Lamar’s “Not Like Us.” Authorities said they could not yet speak to a motive in the shooting, but the investigation was ongoing. Representatives for Drake and Lamar did not immediately comment.

How did two of the most famous artists in the world decide to take the gloves off and bring real-life venom into an extended sparring match for rap supremacy? It was weeks, months and years in the making, with a sudden, breakneck escalation into hip-hop infamy. Here’s a breakdown.

Since late March, the much-anticipated head-to-head seemed inevitable. Following years of “will they or won’t they?” lyrical feints, Lamar hit directly on record first this year during a surprise appearance on the song “Like That” by the Atlanta rapper Future and the producer Metro Boomin, both formerly frequent Drake collaborators.

With audible disgust, Lamar invoked the track “First Person Shooter” from last year’s Drake album, “For All the Dogs,” in which a guest verse from J. Cole referred to himself, Drake and Lamar as “the big three” of modern MCs.

Lamar took exception to the grouping, declaring that there was no big three, “just big me.” He also called himself the Prince to Drake’s Michael Jackson — a deeper, more complex artist versus a troubled, pop-oriented hitmaker.

“Like That” spent three weeks at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, as Future and Metro Boomin released two chart-topping albums — “We Don’t Trust You” and “We Still Don’t Trust You” — that were anchored by a parade of Drake’s past associates, each of whom seemed to share a simmering distaste toward the rapper, who later called the ambush a “20 v. 1” fight.

In early April, J. Cole fought back momentarily , releasing the song “7 Minute Drill,” in which he called Lamar overrated, before backtracking, apologizing and having the song removed from streaming services. But Drake soon picked up the baton, releasing a wide-ranging diss track called “Push Ups” less than a week later that addressed the field, with a special focus on Lamar’s height, shoe size and supposedly disadvantageous business dealings.

Less than a week later, Drake mocked Lamar’s lack of a response on “Taylor Made Freestyle,” a track released only on social media. It featured Drake taunting Lamar for being scared to release music at the same time as Taylor Swift and using A.I. voice filters to mimic Tupac and Snoop Dogg imploring Lamar to battle for the good of the West Coast.

“Since ‘Like That,’ your tone changed a little, you not as enthused,” Drake rapped in an abbreviated third verse, as himself. “How are you not in the booth? It feel like you kinda removed.” (“Taylor Made Freestyle” was later removed from the internet at the request of the Tupac Estate.)

But it was a seemingly tossed-off line from the earlier “Push Ups” that included the name of Lamar’s longtime romantic partner — “I be with some bodyguards like Whitney” — that Lamar would later allude to as a red line crossed, making all subject matter fair game in the songs to come. (It was this same alleged faux pas that may have triggered an intensification of Drake’s beef with Pusha T in 2018.)

How We Got Here

Even with Drake-dissing cameos from Future, Ye (formerly Kanye West), Rick Ross, the Weeknd and ASAP Rocky, the main event was always going to be between Drake, 37, and Lamar, 36, who have spent more than a decade subtly antagonizing one another in songs while maintaining an icy frenemy rapport in public.

In 2011, when Drake introduced Lamar to mainstream audiences with a dedicated showcase on his second album, “Take Care,” and an opening slot on the subsequent arena tour, the tone was one of side-eying competition. “He said that he was the same age as myself/and it didn’t help ’cause it made me even more rude and impatient,” Lamar rapped on “Buried Alive Interlude” of his earliest encounter with a more-famous Drake. (On his Instagram on Friday, Drake released a parody of the track, citing Lamar’s jealousy since then.)

The pair went on to appear together on “Poetic Justice,” a single from Lamar’s debut album, “Good Kid, M.A.A.D City,” in 2012, as well as “___ Problems” by ASAP Rocky the same year.

But their collaborations ceased as Drake became his generation’s premier hitmaker across styles in hip-hop and beyond, while Lamar burrowed deeper into his own psyche on knotty concept albums that brought wide critical acclaim alongside less constant commercial success.

When asked, the two rappers tended to profess admiration for one another’s skill, but seemed to trade subtle digs in verses over the years, always with plausible deniability and in the spirit of competition, leading to something of a hip-hop cold war.

The Week It Went Nuclear

Lamar’s first targeted response, “Euphoria,” was more than six minutes long and released last Tuesday morning. In three sections that raised the temperature as they built, he warned Drake about proceeding and insisted, somewhat facetiously, that things were still friendly. “Know you a master manipulator and habitual liar too,” Lamar rapped. “But don’t tell no lie about me and I won’t tell truths ’bout you.”

He accused the biracial Drake, who was born and raised in Toronto, of imitating Black American heritage and insulting him subliminally. “I hate the way that you walk, the way that you talk, I hate the way that you dress,” Lamar said. “I hate the way that you sneak diss, if I catch flight, it’s gon’ be direct.” And he called Drake’s standing as a father into question: “Teachin’ him morals, integrity, discipline/listen, man, you don’t know nothin’ ’bout that.”

Days later, Lamar doubled down with an Instagram-only track called “6:16 in LA,” borrowing both Drake’s “Back to Back” diss tactic from his 2015 beef with Meek Mill and a song title structure lifted from what is known as Drake’s time-stamp series of raps. Opting for psychological warfare on a beat produced in part by Jack Antonoff, Swift’s chief collaborator, Lamar hinted that he had a mole in Drake’s operation and was aware of his opponent’s opposition research.

“Fake bully, I hate bullies, you must be a terrible person,” he rapped. “Everyone inside your team is whispering that you deserve it.”

That night, Drake’s “Family Matters” started with its own justification for getting personal — “You mentioned my seed, now deal with his dad/I gotta go bad, I gotta go bad” — before taking on Lamar’s fatherhood and standing as a man in excruciating detail. “They hired a crisis management team to clean up the fact that you beat on your queen,” Drake rapped. “The picture you painted ain’t what it seem/you’re dead.”

Yet in a chess move that seemed to anticipate Drake’s familial line of attack, Lamar’s “Meet the Grahams” was released almost immediately. “This supposed to be a good exhibition within the game,” Lamar said, noting that Drake had erred “the moment you called out my family’s name.” Instead of a rap battle, Lamar concluded after another six minutes of psychological dissection, “this a long life battle with yourself.”

He wasn’t done yet. Dispensing with subtlety, Lamar followed up again less than 24 hours later with “Not Like Us,” a bouncy club record in a Los Angeles style that delighted in more traditional rap beef territory, like juvenile insults, proudly unsubstantiated claims of sexual preferences and threats of violence.

Lamar, however, didn’t leave it at that, throwing one more shot at Drake’s authenticity as a rapper, calling him a greedy and artificial user as a collaborator — “not a colleague,” but a “colonizer.”

On Sunday evening, Drake responded yet again. On “The Heart Part 6,” a title taken from Lamar’s career-spanning series, Drake denied the accusation that he preyed on young women, indicated that he had planted the bad information about his fake daughter and seemed to sigh away the fight as “some good exercise.”

“It’s good to get out, get the pen working,” Drake said in an exhausted outro. “You would be a worthy competitor if I was really a predator.” He added, “You know, at least your fans are getting some raps out of you. I’m happy I could motivate you.”

Joe Coscarelli is a culture reporter with a focus on popular music, and the author of “Rap Capital: An Atlanta Story.” More about Joe Coscarelli

Explore the World of Hip-Hop

The long-building and increasingly testy rap beef between Kendrick Lamar and Drake  has exploded into full-bore acrimony .

As their influence and success continue to grow, artists including Sexyy Red and Cardi B are destigmatizing motherhood for hip-hop performers .

ValTown, an account on X and other social media platforms, spotlights gangs and drug kingpins of the 1980s and 1990s , illustrating how they have driven the aesthetics and the narratives of hip-hop.

Three new books cataloging objects central to rap’s physical history  demonstrate the importance of celebrating these relics before they vanish.

Hip-hop got its start in a Bronx apartment building 50 years ago. Here’s how the concept of home has been at the center of the genre ever since .

Over five decades, hip-hop has grown from a new art form to a culture-defining superpower . In their own words, 50 influential voices chronicle its evolution .

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COMMENTS

  1. Writing a newspaper report ppt

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    This How to Write a Newspaper Report KS2 PowerPoint will teach your students how to write an engaging newspaper article, with their target audience in mind. Simply download and print this to help introduce children to forms of writing found in newspaper reports before they begin writing a newspaper report ks2. The way they would write for a ...

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  25. How to write a newspaper article

    How to write a newspaper article. Subject: English. Age range: 11-14. Resource type: Worksheet/Activity. File previews. ppt, 23.77 MB. Powerpoint outlining the writing skills needed to successfully produce a relavent and accurate newspaper article. to let us know if it violates our terms and conditions. Our customer service team will review ...

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    This How to Write a Newspaper Report PowerPoint will teach your students how to write an engaging newspaper article, with their target audience in mind. Simply download and print this to help introduce children to forms of writing found in newspaper reports before they begin writing a newspaper report. Once they're ready to write, check out our newspaper article template. The way they would ...