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How to Make a Presentation in LaTeX

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December 7, 2016 Trudy Firestone 5 Comments

When I was tasked with creating a presentation to share with my co-workers at our weekly tech talk, I chose to use LaTeX. While I briefly considered other tools, like Google Slides or PowerPoint, using LaTeX allowed me to easily separate the styling from my content and create my own theme that I could reuse for all future presentations at Lucid.

What? LaTeX for Presentations?

LaTeX is a typesetting and document creation tool that is often used for creating academic articles due to its ability to display mathematical equations. Beyond that, it has many other capabilities due to a large amount of packages, such as Forest, which I used for laying out sentence trees in a college Linguistics class. One such package, Beamer , allows you to create presentations. While Beamer lacks the simple click and drag functionality of a GUI tool in creating presentations, it makes up for it by automating a large portion of the stylistic work—as long as you like the default styles or are willing to write your own—and offering all the mathematical equations, graphs, and other tools available in LaTeX.

A sample Beamer document:

Sample LaTeX file with default beamer theme

The Beamer commands are straightforward, and the flow of the presentation is easier to follow than it is in a GUI tool. While you could split the styling from the market using html and css, I enjoy using the Beamer package due to its concise creation of slides. Looking at a LaTeX file for a Beamer presentation is almost like looking at an outline which makes it more closely connected to the content the presentation is trying to convey. Unfortunately, I don’t like the default theme…or any of the other themes .

After lots of searching, however, I was able to create my own theme, lucid. Then, just by uncommenting \usetheme{lucid} , I was able to create a presentation I was pleased with. Only a few weeks ago, I was able to reuse the theme and create a new presentation with all the custom styling that I wanted in much less time than a GUI tool would have required to replicate my original theme.

Sample LaTeX file with our new lucid theme

Building Your Own Beamer Theme

While it’s easy to find documentation on creating a presentation using Beamer , it’s more difficult to locate documentation on building a Beamer theme. Therefore, I’m going to walk through creating a simple Beamer theme with its own title page, header and footer, and styled lists.

The first step in creating a Beamer theme is creating the following four files where “lucid” is the name of our new theme:

  • beamerinnerthemelucid.sty
  • beamerouterthemelucid.sty
  • beamercolorthemelucid.sty
  • beamerthemelucid.sty

While it’s not necessary to separate these into four files, it follows the pattern of Beamer’s own themes which allow for mixing and matching different parts of the theme. For instance, if we wanted to use the albatross color theme with the default theme we could replace \usetheme{lucid} in the above sample file like this:

And the output pdf would consist of this:

Default LaTeX Beamer theme with albatross color theme

The three parts of a theme are:

  • Inner: Defines the appearance of any items that make up the slides central content, e.g., lists or the title on the title page
  • Outer: Defines the appearance of the chrome of the slide, e.g., the title and footer of each slide
  • Color: Defines the colors used in various parts of the theme, e.g.,the color for frame titles or the background color

The final file, beamerthemelucid.sty, simply exists to combine all the parts of the theme into the main theme so it can be used without specifying each part of the theme.

beamerthemelucid.sty:

The change to presentation mode at the beginning of the file is added so that the .sty file will match the mode of the presentation .tex file. Beamer automatically converts all files with its document class to presentation mode. The rest of the file simply sets all the portions of the theme to the new lucid theme and then returns the file to the normal mode. Each of the .sty files used to create the theme needs to be put in presentation mode in the same way.

Right now, the theme doesn’t actually change anything. Everything is still using the default theme because we haven’t defined any new styles. Let’s start with the title page. Because the title is part of the inner content of the title page, the definition for its style goes into beamerinnerthemelucid.sty.

I want a title page that’s centered vertically and horizontally like the one in the default theme, but with a bigger font, a different color, and no date. So, let’s add the following to beamerinnerthemelucid.sty between the mode changes:

Sample LaTeX presentation title page with simplified title

The \defbeamertemplate command creates a new template where the first argument is the mode, * in this case, the second argument is what the template is for, and the third argument is the name of the new template. To access the template elsewhere, the given name is used, in this case “lucid.” The final part of \defbeamertemplate is where the actual template is defined using arbitrary LaTeX code. In this case, we use common commands for centering and accessed the title and subtitle via \inserttitle and \insertsubtitle . To get the correct colors, we use \usebeamercolor which fetches the correct colors from the color theme based on the element name given, i.e., the name of the color. Similarly, \usebeamerfont fetches the correct font from the font theme, so that you can specify the font separately.

However, the color and the font remain unchanged, so we need to edit the color theme file next. I want white text on a dark background, so we need to change the background color first.

Sample LaTeX presentation title page with new background color

After adding these commands in beamercolorthemelucid.sty, the title page looks just about the way I want it. The background is gray, and the title and subtitle are in a new size and color. However, Beamer’s default links are still in the bottom right hand corner. To remove them, we add the following line to beamerouterthemelucid.sty because the footer is part of the outer theme.

Updated LaTeX presentation title page without navigation symbols

Like \defbeamertemplate , \setbeamertemplate can be used to define a new template. The element that uses the template is immediately set to use the new template rather than being set separately. In this case, the navigation symbols element is set to empty.

Now that the title page looks just the way I want it to, we can move on to the content slides. While they already have the correct background color and are correctly lacking the navigation symbols in the footer, the title and subtitle are the wrong color and lack style.

 LaTeX presentation content slides without any additional style changes

Because the frame title is part of the outer theme, we add the following to beamerouterthemelucid.sty:

In addition to the now familiar Beamer commands, we use an if statement to differentiate between the cases of when there is and isn’t a subtitle, and we make use of a new package, tikz, which allows the user to create drawings in LaTeX. By using it in the template for the frametitle, we’ve added a rectangle to each frame title in the presentation. We set the color of the rectangle with the Beamer color frametitle-left which the command \usebeamercolor[fg]{frametitle-left} adds to the environment.

LaTeX presentation content frames with updated frametitle layout

The colors and fonts are correctly reading from beamercolorthemelucid.sty, but it hasn’t been updated, so that’s the next step.

LaTeX presentation content frames with updated frametitle colors

The content of the slides is still in the default style, so we turn to beamerinnerthemelucid.sty to modify the template for lists.

Just as \setbeamertemplate can be used to define a new template that is immediately applied, it can also be used to set a template defined by \defbeamertemplate earlier. square is defined by default in the beamer package, and it makes the bullets in an unordered list square.

LaTeX presentation slide with square bullets for the list

To change the colors of content and the list items, we update beamercolortheme.sty again.

LaTeX presentation slides with updated content colors

The last thing missing from our theme is a new footer. We need to add a page number and logo to each page.

LaTeX presentation slides with footer with page numbers and logo

Adding the above to beamerouterthemelucid.sty splits the footer in half, putting the page number out of the total number of pages on one side and a logo on the other. lucidsoftware-logo.png has to be included in the same directory for it to compile correctly. The if statement removes the page number from the first page.

Finally, we add the color for the page number to beamercolorthemelucid.sty:

Creating your own LaTeX theme allows for complete customizability, something you have to work very hard to achieve in more conventional presentational tools. It also makes it trivial to reuse the theme, avoiding wasted effort.

Additional References:

  • Another Theme Example

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Was doing just that in the ’80s with DCF and Generalised Markup Language.

Styles were called “profiles”. You could roll your own, tailor an existing style or buy one.

The same base document could be formatted for a book, presentation or display.

Likely still used in producing IBM manuals.

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So, have you uploaded your theme on CTAN? That’s the TeX-way to share 🙂

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Thanks a lot This article helped me a lot to prepare my communication for this week (Stil working on it) Much thanks <3

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Thank you a million times, i had a very very incredible experience with your tutorial. I made my own theme and i love it 🙂 I’m going to make a video on YouTube for this beautiful simplistic tex presentation solution. I’ll definitely link to your great tutorial there.

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I do agree with all the ideas you have introduced on your post.

They’re really convincing and wll definitely work. Nonetheless, the posts are too brief for starters. May you please lengthen them a bit from subsequent time? Thanks for the post.

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Academic Presentation Template

A LaTeX template for academic presentations with arXiv number, coloured equation boxes, customisable slide numbering.

Academic Presentation Template

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How to create a basic slideshow presentation in LaTeX with Beamer

This is the 19th video in a series of 21 by Dr Vincent Knight of Cardiff University. Here we see how to create a very basic presentation in LaTeX, using the beamer document class. We see how to use the \frame command to create slides, and in the next tutorial we'll see how to add a title page and more.

The example given in the video is also provided here as a template. To get started, click here to open the 'Presentation' example .

See the full list of tutorial videos .

  • Documentation Home
  • Learn LaTeX in 30 minutes

Overleaf guides

  • Creating a document in Overleaf
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  • Using the Overleaf project menu
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  • Supporting modern fonts with X Ǝ L a T e X

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  • Theorems and proofs
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How to create a basic slideshow presentation in LaTeX with Beamer

This is the 19th video in a series of 21 by Dr Vincent Knight of Cardiff University. Here we see how to create a very basic presentation in LaTeX, using the beamer document class. We see how to use the \frame command to create slides, and in the next tutorial we'll see how to add a title page and more.

The example given in the video is also provided here as a template. To get started, click here to open the 'Presentation' example .

See the full list of tutorial videos .

  • Documentation Home
  • Learn LaTeX in 30 minutes

Overleaf guides

  • Creating a document in Overleaf
  • Uploading a project
  • Copying a project
  • Creating a project from a template
  • Using the Overleaf project menu
  • Including images in Overleaf
  • Exporting your work from Overleaf
  • Working offline in Overleaf
  • Using Track Changes in Overleaf
  • Using bibliographies in Overleaf
  • Sharing your work with others
  • Using the History feature
  • Debugging Compilation timeout errors
  • How-to guides
  • Guide to Overleaf’s premium features

LaTeX Basics

  • Creating your first LaTeX document
  • Choosing a LaTeX Compiler
  • Paragraphs and new lines
  • Bold, italics and underlining

Mathematics

  • Mathematical expressions
  • Subscripts and superscripts
  • Brackets and Parentheses
  • Fractions and Binomials
  • Aligning equations
  • Spacing in math mode
  • Integrals, sums and limits
  • Display style in math mode
  • List of Greek letters and math symbols
  • Mathematical fonts
  • Using the Symbol Palette in Overleaf

Figures and tables

  • Inserting Images
  • Positioning Images and Tables
  • Lists of Tables and Figures
  • Drawing Diagrams Directly in LaTeX
  • TikZ package

References and Citations

  • Bibliography management with bibtex
  • Bibliography management with natbib
  • Bibliography management with biblatex
  • Bibtex bibliography styles
  • Natbib bibliography styles
  • Natbib citation styles
  • Biblatex bibliography styles
  • Biblatex citation styles
  • Multilingual typesetting on Overleaf using polyglossia and fontspec
  • Multilingual typesetting on Overleaf using babel and fontspec
  • International language support
  • Quotations and quotation marks

Document structure

  • Sections and chapters
  • Table of contents
  • Cross referencing sections, equations and floats
  • Nomenclatures
  • Management in a large project
  • Multi-file LaTeX projects
  • Lengths in L a T e X
  • Headers and footers
  • Page numbering
  • Paragraph formatting
  • Line breaks and blank spaces
  • Text alignment
  • Page size and margins
  • Single sided and double sided documents
  • Multiple columns
  • Code listing
  • Code Highlighting with minted
  • Using colours in LaTeX
  • Margin notes
  • Font sizes, families, and styles
  • Font typefaces
  • Supporting modern fonts with X Ǝ L a T e X

Presentations

  • Environments

Field specific

  • Theorems and proofs
  • Chemistry formulae
  • Feynman diagrams
  • Molecular orbital diagrams
  • Chess notation
  • Knitting patterns
  • CircuiTikz package
  • Pgfplots package
  • Typesetting exams in LaTeX
  • Attribute Value Matrices

Class files

  • Understanding packages and class files
  • List of packages and class files
  • Writing your own package
  • Writing your own class

Advanced TeX/LaTeX

  • In-depth technical articles on TeX/LaTeX

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Microsoft 365 Life Hacks > Presentations > How you can use AI to help you make the perfect presentation handouts

How you can use AI to help you make the perfect presentation handouts

Enhancing your presentation with a well-crafted handout can significantly improve its impact. A presentation handout, summarizing key information from your slides, not only aids in audience comprehension and engagement but also assists in your preparation.

A book of “the book of Romans”

What is a presentation handout?

Whether you’re creating a lecture, business presentation, or sharing research in a PowerPoint, giving your audience a presentation handout can help them retain the information. A handout can also help them follow along and engage with your presentation. And best of all, creating a presentation handout can help you prepare for the presentation itself— and AI can help you speed up the presentation-handout creation process.

Use AI to help you find examples of presentation handouts

If you’ve never made a presentation handout before, you might not know where to start. It can help to view examples of presentation handouts so you can gain an understanding of what’s expected of you. Use these prompts in your preferred AI platform to help you find presentation handout examples:

  • I’m a student creating a presentation on scientific research. Can you show me an example of a presentation handout for a research presentation?
  • I’m creating a PowerPoint to share new school rules with my students. Can you help me find a good example of a presentation handout for teachers?
  • I’m presenting a business report. Can you help me find a few examples of handouts to go along with a business report presentation?

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Use AI to help you organize your presentation handout

If you’re not sure how to organize your presentation handout, AI can help. You can copy and paste each slide into your favorite AI platform or give it a summary of your presentation. It’s important that you give the AI tool as much context as possible about your presentation to get the best results. Once you’ve given the AI tool enough context about your presentation, try these prompts to organize it:

  • What key points from my PowerPoint are essential to include in my presentation handout?
  • Based on my presentation, how long does my presentation handout need to be?
  • Is there any information in my PowerPoint that doesn’t need to be in my presentation handout?

Ask AI to proofread your presentation handouts

Once you’ve created your presentation handout, you can copy and paste it into your preferred AI platform and ask it to proofread your work. It’s important that your presentation handout is clear and easy to follow. If you want AI to proofread your presentation handout, try these prompts:

  • How can I simplify my presentation handout?
  • Is my presentation handout clear and easy to read?
  • Are there any spelling errors in my presentation?
  • How well does my presentation handout follow my presentation?
  • Is there any crucial information missing from my presentation handout?
  • Can you make sure the style and tone of my presentation handout is professional?

Remember, while AI provides invaluable assistance, a final personal review is essential to catch any details it might miss, such as incorrect contact information. Finally, ensure there’s space for audience notes in your handout and practice your presentation thoroughly for a confident delivery.

When you’re done proofreading your presentation handout, make sure to leave some space in it for your audience to take notes. If you’re printing out your handouts, ensure you have enough copies for your audience. Don’t forget to practice your presentation so that you feel confident.

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    I really like the way Keynote and MS Office (and also OpenOffice & similar) support a presentation mode that displays the current slide, the next (and maybe previous) slide, the elapsed and current time, and also any notes attached to the slides on one screen and the presentation itself on the beamer/second screen.. It enables me to give good, professional presentations without having to know ...

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