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How to Write a Speech About Someone I Admire

Kimberley McGee

Tips on Writing a Welcome Address at a High School Graduation

It is an honor to be asked or to be able to write a speech about someone that you admire. When the task is to write a speech, it can feel like a daunting endeavor, particularly when the subject is someone you look up to or who had a large impact on your life. Whether it is for an award ceremony or a school assignment, family reunion or wedding anniversary, cobbling together a compelling speech about someone you admire can be a moving moment as well as an enjoyable experience.

Getting Started on Speech Writing

Before you reach for all the words, begin with just a few. Create an outline that will touch on your key points. Consider the person and jot down what comes to mind when you concentrate on the individual as well as how he or she has made an impact on you and others. If it is a family member, reach into the past and showcase some of his or her early experiences.

Once you have a relatively rough outline of what you hope to touch on, write your introduction. The introduction sets the tone and grabs your audience. Some ways to craft an attention-grabbing introduction is to start with a question, a well-known joke or anecdote. Make sure it is something that the entire audience can understand.

Person I Admire Speech Body Basics

When writing a speech about someone you admire, turn your attention not only to the person, but accomplishments, inflections of speech or other personal traits. There are two objectives when giving a speech, to make a good impression and leave the audience with a clear and informative understanding of your subject. Consider your audience before sitting down to write your speech. The missive should reflect the occasion, either light and jovial or stern and touching. Focus your audience’s attention on the main facts quickly by giving a preview in the opening descriptive paragraph. Establish goodwill from the beginning and grab the crowd’s attention with a pithy turn of phrase or poignant piece of literature.

Reach Out for Inspiration

Look at an example of a speech about someone who was admired for speech writing tips. Comedian and actress Maya Rudolph gave a gripping commencement speech in 2015 that focused on people that she admired. These included her family as well as people she admired in the industry, including Oprah Winfrey and Beyonce. If you need moments of inspiration while you are writing your speech about someone you admire, turn to those who have gone before you. Studying compelling speeches can help you understand how to convey emotion and impact through your carefully chosen words. If you are writing about family members, ask those who have given speeches in the past for encouragement.

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  • University of Pittsburgh: Speaking in the Disciplines (SID)
  • Forbes: 10 Key Ways to Write a Speech

Kimberley McGee is an award-winning journalist with 20+ years of experience writing about education, jobs, business trends and more for The New York Times, Las Vegas Review-Journal, Today’s Parent and other publications. She graduated with a B.A. in Journalism from UNLV. Her full bio and clips can be seen at www.vegaswriter.com.

Descriptive Essay

Descriptive Essay About A Person You Admire

Cathy A.

How to Craft the Perfect Descriptive Essay About A Person You Admire

Published on: Jan 26, 2023

Last updated on: Nov 29, 2023

Descriptive Essay About A Person You Admire

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Are you looking for tips on how to write a descriptive essay about someone you admire? Do you have someone special in your life that you would like to immortalize through words? 

A lot of people find writing a descriptive essay about a person quite challenging. But with the right structure and steps, you can easily create an engaging piece of writing.

Look no further! You’ll get these steps right here! 

This article will provide you with examples and helpful advice that you need to craft an effective and engaging essay. Plus, we’ll show you what makes a great descriptive essay with examples.

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The Basics of Descriptive Essay

A descriptive essay is an essay that requires the student to provide a detailed and precise description of their chosen subject.

When writing about a person, the goal is to introduce your reader to the person you are writing about. 

You will want to include important facts about them and discuss their personality, including their beliefs, hobbies, and interests. You should also provide vivid examples that illustrate the person's characteristics.

Watch the video below to learn more about expository writing:

How to Write a Descriptive Essay About Someone You Admire

Now that you know what makes a great descriptive essay about a person , it’s time to start writing. Here are some steps that will help you create an effective and engaging essay:

1. Choose a Person You Admire:

Select someone who has impacted your life in a special way, or someone whose qualities you admire greatly. Look for role models in your life. In addition, it is important to choose someone you have enough information. 

For example writing a descriptive essay about mother is easier than writing an essay about anyone else.

You can also polish your descriptive writing skills by writing on other descriptive essay topics .

2. Research the Person Thoroughly:

Before you begin writing, make sure you have enough information about the person. You can research by talking to people who know the person well, or reading books and articles written about them.

3. Create an Outline:

This helps keep your essay organized and focused. You can use the basic structure of an essay with an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion as a guide. So make sure you include all of the important points in your outline.

4. Use Vivid Language and Imagery:

Describe anything that stands out about the person, such as their physical appearance and mannerisms. Use powerful adjectives to give life to your essay and make it more interesting for your readers.

5. Include Relevant Examples:

Using real-life examples adds depth and texture to your essay. These can be anything from stories of when you met the person or a unique trait that they possess. Examples will also help make your essay more illustrative and descriptive.

6. Write an Effective Conclusion:

Your conclusion should serve as a summary of all the points you have discussed in your essay. Make sure to end on a positive note and provide your readers with a lasting impression of your subject’s character.

Reading some example essays will clarify it even more. So let's check out some examples below.

Descriptive Essay About a Person You Admire Examples

If you are given a task to write a paragraph about a person you admire, these examples will help you!

The Person I Admire The Most Essay 200 Words

The Person I Admire The Most Essay 250 Words

The Person I Admire Most 300 Words

Here are some more examples to get a better idea of how a descriptive essay looks like:

A Famous Person You Admire Essay

The Person I Admire The Most My Mother Essay

Descriptive Essay About A Person in My Life

You can read more descriptive essay examples on various other topics as well. 

Key Points for Writing A Descriptive Essay On The Person I Admire The Most 

Writing a descriptive essay about the person you admire the most can be a rewarding experience. 

Here are some key points and tips to help you create an engaging and meaningful essay:

  • Vivid Descriptions: Use descriptive language to paint a clear picture of the person, including their qualities, achievements, and impact.
  • Emotional Connection: Explain the emotional connection you have with the person and why their presence is meaningful.
  • Use Concrete Examples: Provide specific anecdotes and examples that illustrate the person's admirable qualities and actions.
  • Reflect on Life Lessons: Discuss the lessons you've learned from this person and how they've influenced your personal growth and values.
  • Stay Authentic: Be genuine and sincere in your writing. Your admiration for the person should come through as a heartfelt expression

To conclude,

Writing an engaging descriptive essay about someone you admire can be quite challenging, but it is definitely worth the effort. With these tips in mind, you will be well on your way to writing a great essay.

Do you need further professional help? Do you want to " hire someone to write my essay "? Don't worry! We've got you covered.

MyPerfectWords.com offers the top essay writing service for all types of essays. Our professional and experienced writers have years of experience in crafting high-quality custom essays.

So contact our descriptive essay writing service today. We guarantee you will be satisfied with the quality and accuracy of our work.

Cathy A. (Marketing, Law)

Cathy has been been working as an author on our platform for over five years now. She has a Masters degree in mass communication and is well-versed in the art of writing. Cathy is a professional who takes her work seriously and is widely appreciated by clients for her excellent writing skills.

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How to Write a Speech About Someone I Admire

By lorraine ramirez / in science & education.

Tribute speeches are the time to recognise your subject's accomplishments.

Whether for a school assignment, an award ceremony, or a wedding or anniversary honouring a loved one or friend, you may be asked to make a tribute speech about a person that you admire. Prepare in advance, finding the right words to express your reasons for admiring your subject. Structure your written speech for the greatest impact and to make it memorable.

  • Whether for a school assignment, an award ceremony, or a wedding or anniversary honouring a loved one or friend, you may be asked to make a tribute speech about a person that you admire.
  • Structure your written speech for the greatest impact and to make it memorable.

Write an outline of your key points. Make a list of why you admire this person and others should too. Note their values, actions or accomplishments. For example, record ways your grandfather managed to become one of the first successful businessmen in his community or how your mother and father have stayed happily married together for 50 years while raising you and your siblings.

Write an introduction. Keep your audience in mind and adjust your level of formality depending on the situation. Start with an effective attention grabber - a question, anecdote, or joke - that introduces the subject of your speech. Use an attention grabber that your whole audience will understand and appreciate. Avoid inside jokes or obscure references.

Move along steadily. After the attention grabber, move into introducing your subject and giving some general overall reasons why this person deserves praise and recognition. Use a transition to bridge your introduction and body paragraphs, such as: "And therefore, I want to briefly mention a few reasons why I hold Mr. King in such high esteem."

  • Keep your audience in mind and adjust your level of formality depending on the situation.
  • After the attention grabber, move into introducing your subject and giving some general overall reasons why this person deserves praise and recognition.

Develop your general ideas in the body of your speech. Use your outline to guide you through your key points when writing your body paragraphs. Offer concrete supporting examples for each of your points. For instance, if you were talking about your English professor and wanted everyone to know how amiable he was, explain how on numerous occasions you would bombard him with concerns about your work and how he took the time and effort to help you, always with a smile. Be brief in your examples.

  • Develop your general ideas in the body of your speech.
  • Use your outline to guide you through your key points when writing your body paragraphs.

Add a conclusion. Don't re-list all your reasons, but briefly touch on your key points to reinforce them to your audience. Conclude your speech with as strong an impact as possible. For example, "Mr. King has been an invaluable resource to this company because of his many years of dedicated and loyal service, his incredible work ethic and innovative approach to generating exciting and new ideas for this company. It is with deep respect and gratitude that we honour him here tonight."

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Speaking skills: A person you admire

Rich admires Manchester Utd's Antonio Valencia.

In this week's Premier Skills English Podcast, Jack and Rich talk about the backgrounds of some Premier League players and Rich talks about one player that he admires. Then, we ask you to tell us about someone you admire. The language focus is on the words 'for', 'since' and 'ago' and how we can use them to talk about time. We also focus on vocabulary connected to personality and look at how we use adjectives and nouns to talk about different personality characteristics. As always, we also have a new football phrase for you to guess. Enjoy!

Jack : What are you reading, Rich?

Rich : I’m reading this book about where footballers come from. It’s really interesting.

Jack : Footballers come from all over the world, that’s a photo of Yaya Toure, isn’t it?

Rich : Yes, yes it is.

Jack : Wasn’t he born in Ivory Coast?

Rich : Yep. It’s a really good read. Did you know that his two brothers were professional footballers, too?

Jack : I did. Kolo played for Liverpool and Arsenal.

Rich : It’s a really good book. I’ll lend it to you when I’ve finished it.

Welcome - Someone you admire

Rich : Hello my name’s Rich

Jack : and I’m Jack

Rich : and welcome to this week’s Premier Skills English podcast

Jack : Where we talk about football and help you with your English.

Jack : What’s happening this week, Rich?

Rich : In this week’s podcast, we’re talking about famous people you admire. We’re going to talk about someone that we admire and we’re going to ask you to tell us about someone that you admire.

Jack : And we’re going to look at the words; since, for and ago.

Rich : We also have a set of adjectives for you to learn. The adjectives are all connected to positive characteristics.

Jack : So, the key word in this podcast is to admire. I think we should start by looking at this word in a bit more detail.

Rich : To admire means to respect someone because of something they have done or for their personal qualities.

Jack : I admire doctors and firefighters who work in dangerous situations. They are brave or courageous because they put their own lives at risk to help others.

Rich : Yes, I also have a lot of admiration for doctors and firefighters. But, admiration, doesn’t always have to be about something as important as life and death. For example, I admire footballers like James Milner at Liverpool and N’golo Kante at Chelsea. I admire them because they are tenacious - they never give up - they always give 100%.

Jack : Yes, Kante is not very tall and when he was younger lots of clubs didn’t give him a chance. But, he never gave up and look at him now!

Rich : There’s a section on N’golo Kante in this book I’m reading. I’m going to talk about one player I admire in the next section.

Topic Focus

Jack : Rich, you’ve already mentioned N’Golo Kante and Yaya Toure. Who else have you read about in that book?

Rich : There’s a section on Jamie Vardy.

Jack : Everyone knows that story! It’s a good story though. He was working in a factory just a few years ago and now he’s a Premier League Champion. There’s going to be a Hollywood movie about it.

Rich : Alright, well, there are lots of other interesting stories, too. Did you know that there are quite a few footballers that arrived in the UK as asylum seekers?

Jack : I know about Saido Berahino. He plays for Stoke now and he arrived from Burundi as a child.

Rich : Victor Moses at Chelsea came to the UK as an asylum seeker, too. And there are a few other footballers who were refugees when they were kids - like Liverpool defender Dejan Lovren who had to escape the war in Bosnia in the 1990s. Jack: Who are you reading about at the moment?

Rich : Antonio Valencia

Jack : Ah ...  The Manchester United player.

Rich : Yes, he has an interesting background, too. He grew up in poverty and now well ... I don’t think he needs to worry about money anymore.

Jack : Why do you admire him? 

Rich : I’ve always admired him as a player because I think he’s really hardworking on the pitch. Like Kante and Milner I mentioned earlier. But now that I’ve read more about him I admire him even more.

Jack : He’s from Ecuador, isn’t he?

Rich : Yes, he is. He was born in a very poor, small town in the north-east of Ecuador 31 years ago. Valencia has said in interviews that kidnapping is a big problem in his hometown and one of the first things he did when he had enough money was to move his family to Quito - the capital.

Jack : He must have had an amazing journey - from there to Old Trafford!

Rich : As a kid, he used to play football barefoot - without any boots or socks. And he used to sell drinks outside a stadium with his mum and then after the match would look for empty plastic bottles that his family could sell for a little bit of money.

Jack : How did he find a club?

Rich : He didn’t play on a football pitch until he was 11 years old. And then, when he was 16, he was spotted by a scout and asked to play in Quito the capital. He didn’t tell his dad because he wanted him to finish his studies. His mum gave him the money for the bus ticket and said goodbye. 

Jack : That’s really brave to leave home at just 16.

Rich : Yes, I think it shows real courage. Everything that I’ve read about Valencia is that he’s very determined and ambitious, too. He played in the capital for three years, and then, when he was just 19, he moved to Spain on his own.

Jack : Wow! That must have been difficult.

Rich : It wasn’t a great success and he only stayed in Spain for one year but Valencia was determined. He didn’t return home - he moved to England to play for Wigan. He has been living in the UK since 2006 - for over 10 years.

Jack : Ecuador to Wigan! I imagine that was a culture shock!

Rich : Yes, the book tells one story of Valencia being very shy and not being able to speak English or read Spanish but he also showed how independent and self-reliant he was. Within three days he had bought a car and rented a house by himself. 

Jack : And he plays for Manchester Utd now - one of the biggest football clubs in the world!

Rich : He moved to Manchester Utd 8 years ago and has played over 200 times for the club, won the Premier League twice and has been captain of his country since 2014. I think his story is a good one and the qualities I admire most about him are probably his courage, his determination and his independence.

Jack : Yes, I agree, it’s a great story. Now, we want you to start thinking about a person you admire. It can be a footballer but it could also be another famous person or someone in your family or someone you know. 

Rich : After you listen to the next section we want you to tell us about this person in the comments section including some of the language we are going to talk about now.

Language Focus

Jack : Let’s look at some of the language we used in that last section. We’re going to look at three words; for, since and ago.

Rich : All these words are used to talk about time. But we use them in slightly different ways.

Jack : Let’s look at ago first. We use ago to talk about something that happened at a specific time in the past. Rich ‘When did you leave the UK to go and live in Spain?’

Rich : Good question. About 10 years ago. I moved to Spain about 10 years ago.

Jack : When we use ago we talk in the past. We use the past simple in the example that Rich used in the last section. He said ‘He was born 31 years ago’.

Rich : Let’s move onto the next word since. We use since to talk about when something started in the past.

Jack : When we use since we usually use the present perfect. Rich, ‘How long have you lived in Spain?’

Rich : Erm ... since 2007.  I’ve lived in Spain since 2007.

Jack : You can see that Rich used the present perfect here. This is because he’s talking about something that started in the past; Rich moved to Spain, and hasn’t finished. Rich still lives in Spain today.

Rich : Also remember that we use since to show a starting point in time. So, the starting point could be a year like 2007, or a time, or month or an event. You could say I’ve been doing this since 2007, since 6 ’o'clock, since May, or since my birthday.

Jack : One example from the earlier section was ‘Antonio Valencia has been captain of his country since 2014.’

Rich : The third word we want to look at is ‘for’. We use for to talk about a period of time. 

Jack : Rich, ‘How long have you been living in Spain?’

Rich : For about 10 years. I’ve been living in Spain for 10 years.

Jack : Rich said for 10 years. That’s the period of time. The period of time could be ten minutes, ten days, ten centuries whatever. Be careful with the pronunciation. When we use for as a preposition, it’s pronounced Fe, not for like the number.

Rich : You might have noticed that I used the present perfect in this example but for can be used in other tenses, too. For example, Antonio Valencia played in the capital for three years. 

Jack : If you want to practise this a little more, we’ve got some activities to help you further down the page.

Rich : We also used lots of vocabulary earlier and we’ve got some activities to help you with that, too so don’t forget to have a look.

Can you work out this week’s football phrase?

Rich : Have you got a football phrase for us this week? 

Jack : Yes, I have, but first, last week’s football phrase. The phrase was  ‘memorabilia’.

Rich : Memorabilia is the stuff you collect that is connected to a famous person, an interesting place or activity. Jack collects football memorabilia. Old things connected to football. Old match programmes, coins and medals that kind of thing.

Jack : Well done to Liubomyr and Violinka from Ukraine, Elghoul from Algeria, Mon from Egypt, Anhduongspurs, and phhchoung123 from Vietnam, dvd023 from Spain, Emir from Bosnia, Ahmed Adam from Sudan, and Kwesimanifest from Ghana. You all got the right answer!

Rich : So, what’s this week’s football phrase, Jack?

Jack : This week’s phrase is **** *****. This is a difficult phrase to know. On the first of July the football season officially ends and many players are out of contract. This means that their contracts with their clubs officially end and they can sign for any other club and their previous club doesn’t receive a transfer fee. These players are called **** ****** and clubs like to buy them because they’re cheaper. 

Rich : That is a difficult one. Let’s see if anybody can get it right. Maybe we’ll put a few clues in the comments section if nobody gets it.

Jack : Right, that’s all we have time for this week! Don’t forget to write your answers to our questions and make a guess at our football phrase in the comments below.

Rich : Bye for now and enjoy your football!

How much did you understand?

In the podcast, Rich and Jack used lots of adjectives connected to personality that might be new for you. You can see two examples here: 

Everything that I've read about Antonio Valencia tells me that he is very determined and ambitious .
Valencia was very shy and not able to speak English but he also showed how independent and self-reliant he was .

There were a few more tricky adjectives in the podcast. Did you know what they all meant? Try the activity below, then, listen to the podcast again to hear how we used the words in context. This can really help with understanding.

For, Since and Ago

All three of these words are used to talk about time in different ways.

For  is used to describe a period of time such as a number of minutes, days or years etc. For  can be used when we are talking about the present, past or the future. Take a look at this example from the podcast:

Antonio Valencia played in the capital (Quito) for three years.

Since  is used to describe a point in time in the past. This point could be a year (2012), a month (May), a time (6 o' clock), or an event (my birthday, last season) etc.  Since  is generally used with the present perfect to talk about something that started in the past and continues in the present. Take a look at this example from the podcast: 

Antonio Valencia has been captain of his country since 2014.

Ago  is used to describe something that happened at a specific point in time in the past. When we use  ago  we talk in the past and we usually use the past simple. Take a look at this example from the podcast:

Antonio Valencia was born 31 years ago .

In this week's podcast, Rich and Jack used a few examples of for, since and ago.  In this activity, take a look at one section from the podcast and try to put the correct word in each gap.

Antonio Valencia was very poor as a child in Ecuador. He is now captain of his country.

Nouns and Adjectives

Earlier, you looked at ten adjectives to describe positive characteristics. Many of these adjectives were taken from this week's podcast. All ten adjectives can also be used as nouns. Look at these sentences from the podcast:

I think firefighters are courageous because they work in dangerous situations. One of the qualities I admire most about Antonio Valencia is his courage .

In the first example the adjective (courageous) is used but in the second sentence, we need to use the noun (courage) because we are not describing the person directly; we are talking about the quality. All ten of the adjectives we looked at in activity 1 can be changed into nouns. Do you think you know all ten? In this activity, take a look at the words and decide if they are adjectives or nouns.  

Jamie Vardy was determined to get to the Premier League! He was working in a factory a few years ago!

Who do you admire?

In the podcast, Rich spoke about Antonio Valencia - a footballer who he admires. Can you remember the definition of admire ? 

Admire means to respect someone because of what they have done or a personal quality that he/she has. 

The noun is admiration and the definition is:

Admiration is the feeling of respect that you have for someone because of what they have done or a personal quality that they possess.

We would like you to tell us about a person that you admire. This person can be a footballer, a sports person, a celebrity, a politician, someone in your family or someone you know. We want to know:

  • Where does this person come from? What is his/her background?
  • What positive qualities does this person have? 
  • What has this person done to earn your admiration? Why do you admire this person?

We would like you to write about this person in the comments section below. We like you to try and use some of the language (for, since, ago) and vocabulary (determined/determination) that you have studied in this lesson. We would also like you to respond to other user's comments and tell them what you know about the people that other users write about.

Please login to take this quiz.

What do you think?

In this week’s podcast, Rich spoke about a person that he admires.

Remember to write your guess at this week's football phrase and answer the questions above in the comments section below.

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hsn's picture

Task I admire my ex-general manager. We had worked together about seven year. I never saw him nervous in this period, always smiling. He was very polite , emphatic and always delegates his authority to the subordinates. Comment • I admire my team captain Harry Kane. He plays very well and has ability of coordination and cooperation with his teammates. I admire great actress Meryl Streep. She can play all characters spontaneously.She is like born to be actress. Phrases • I used to be tenacious person and always tried to achieve difficult matters in my business life. Notes • I always wonder successful footballers who grow up in the hard conditions like poverty. If they weren't in these situations, would they be able to do it? Can they be tenacious determined and ambitious when they lived in the high standart life?

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bao1960's picture

I feel so pleasure as my students complete this quiz.

Bonus, Jade and Tim 3 students in my class tudy well today with the lesson: The person I admire.

My student David finish 6 out of 6 questions. Good job.

Today in my class there are 2 students Jade and Mia have accomplished the quiz well. Thanks my assistant Hanna.

This lesson for my students study about describing famous people.

mobeckham's picture

I think this week's football phrase is ( free agent )

I will talk about Mohamed Salah despite playing for my rivalry team but I still admire him because he is from my original country and he is so hardworking , passionate about the game , determined and very fast. He is also eager and generous and he is a down to earth person and always helps others

In football I admire Sir Alex Ferguson , David Beckham , Zlatan Ibrahimovic , Marcus Rashford and Mohamed Salah

Outside football , I admire Muhammad Ali

how to write a speech about someone you admire

I admire Leo Messi, who plays for Barcelona. He is loyal as he has stayed with the same club for a long time. He is a very good player. 

PT

"Correct me" In Football i admire Ricardo Quaresma. He was born in Lisbon, Portugal and he is from a gypsy family.

Ricardo Quaresma debut in Sporting team when we was 17 years old. He is a very good player. He was played at FC Porto, Barcelona and now he play at Besiktas.

Rich's picture

Thanks for your message ycart! Your English is good and I don't have any problems understanding your message. There are a couple of things, however, that you should change to make your English even better! I've made a few corrections below. Have a look at my version and your version and see what differences there are.

Ricardo Quaresma made his debut for Sporting team when we was 17 years old. He is a very good player. He has played for FC Porto, Barcelona and now he plays for Besiktas.

Hope that helps a little!

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

Ammar's picture

hello '

The phrase might be **** *****

Martin's picture

I really like this activity

RS

The football phrase is a **** *****

Well done, Milos. You're spot on!

Ahmed Adam Mamado's picture

Outside of football I admire the boxer Mohammed Ali Clay

Hi Ahmed Adam

Muhammad Ali was a wonderful ambassador for his sport and I think people from around the world admired him!

Rich - The Premier Skills English Team

Yes, U R right teacher, R!ch. He's the sportsman of the century, If I'm not mistaken.

He earned my admiration when payed about 700,000$ from his own pocket to save a mosque in Seville from being destroyed by the government. He also set up a series of Halal restaurants in Europe for Muslims and always does work for charity. He refuses to eat in Ramadan despite the league being on it's peak. He is determind, hard-working and humble, I admire him because of the work he does off the pitch rather than his work on the pitch.

I admire the Malian striker Fredrick Kanoute who was born 39 years ago in France. He started his professional career at Ligue A side Olympique Lyon in 1997. After that he joined the Hummers then Spurs in the Premier League. But his best moments were when playing for La Liga side Seville, winning two UEFA Cups (now Europa League) in a row, one UEFA Super Cup, Two Copa del Rey titles and one Super Copa de Espana. He has been playing for them for 7 years, becoming the club's highest scoring foreign player. He also won African Footballer of the Year in 2007, being the first player not born in Africa to have won it. He had an emotional farewell when the fans of FC Seville sang him (Oh Kanoute), a song of his own, then he moved to China in 2012. Since he retired in 2013, his news has been cut off.

assemjuve's picture

Outside football i admire Nelson Mandella, a person who fought racism in south africa to lead the country into freedom.

Hi assemjuve Nelson Mandella is a great man. he is a father of modern South Africa and a universal figure.

Hello Ahmed You are right,the humanity will never forget all what he did.

Inside football i admire ronaldinho, a guy who used to clean the shoes of players as a member of the stuff,to one of the best players in the history of football.

the phrase is **** *****

kwesimanifest's picture

I admire my dad alot because since my infancy he has made sure thatwherever he couldn't attain in his education he will do everything possible to get me there. His determination for all these years has come to fruition with my passing out of University. Not too long ago his business hit the rocks but his determination has brought me this far. He is a trader and for him to have achieved this feet i dove my heart for him.

My admiration for Henry Thierry is very great. I like the fact that in his days of playing he was almost always on point strikesand very clinical as well.

UA

I think the phrase is "transfers"

This week's phrase is **** *****

DangNguyen's picture

The phrase is " Free Player "

admin's picture

Hi DangNguyen - that's almost right...

Jack - The Premier Skills English Team

elghoul's picture

In football I admire Di maria whose story is like Valencia's one. He was born in Argentina and from what I remember seeing a tv documentary he worked to help his family since he was a child. He carryed coal for years and managed to play football in the same time. His parents were very proud of him.

Outside football I have been admiring Mbarek since I met him when he worked helping my grandfather growing vegetables in his farm. He is originated from Morroco and went to Algeria as a hand worker. He was very tenacious and fiercy man. He has been working in all parts of our village where he can find a free place to farm. His tools were always on his hands.

The phrase is "**** *****"

Liubomyr's picture

The football phrase is a ‘**** *****’. For me the phase seems to be not a difficult one.

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Language: Adjectives and nouns connected to personality

Task: Tell us about someone you admire

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This lesson focuses on speaking skills in the context of talking about a famous person your learners admire. The lesson also introduces a set of adjectives that focus on positive characteristics.

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How to Write a Descriptive Paragraph About a Person (With Examples)

How to Write a Descriptive Paragraph About a Person (With Examples)

4-minute read

  • 7th January 2023

Describing a person or character is difficult for even the most successful authors. It requires a balance of words to make sure they shine through without the language being too heavy. In this article, we’ll look at how to write a descriptive paragraph about a person, share some examples, and talk about different strategies.

1.   Brainstorm Your Ideas

Brainstorming is crucial to any writing process. It’s the process in which you think of ideas for what you’d like to write about. In this case, you’re writing a descriptive paragraph about a person. It’s important to use adjectives to describe the features or characteristics you want to focus on.

One way to come up with ideas for a descriptive paragraph about a person is to go through the five senses. Use the questions below to get some ideas for what you want to highlight about your person.

Appeal to your reader’s senses – smell, taste, sound, sight, and touch

Smell: How does the person smell? Do they wear perfume? Are they doing an activity that would make them have a certain smell?

Taste: Do you associate a certain food with this person? Does it make you think of a specific taste? Can you taste something due to a certain smell they have?

Sound: Do they have a unique voice or laugh? Are they doing an activity that has distinctive sounds?

Sight: What prominent features do they have? For example, think about their dressing style, their smile, or their surroundings. What do you see them doing in your mind when you see a photo of them? What memories do you have of this person? Does this person remind you of something or someone?

Touch: What textures do you see? For example, imagine their skin or clothing. How does it feel if you hug them?

2.   Begin With a Short and Snappy Sentence

Like with any type of writing, you want to hook your reader so that they want to continue reading. In this case, you can use a topic sentence, if appropriate, to introduce your reader to the person. For example:

Or, if you want to be more creative, you can reel them in with a short and snappy sentence about this person. This is called a writing hook . This sentence should focus on a stand-out detail or characteristic about the person you’re describing. For example:

3.   Describe the Person

Now, this is the hard part. But, if you’ve brainstormed plenty of ideas and know which ones you want to focus on, it will be easier. Let’s look at some examples to get a better idea of how to write a descriptive paragraph about a person using the prompt “describe a person you admire.”

Comments: This paragraph is pretty typical of most students. It gives lots of visual details of the person and uses a simile or two (“ Her eyes are like the color of honey” and “Her smile shines like the sun” ). While this strategy gets the job done, it’s not very exciting to read. In fact, it can be quite boring!

Let’s look at how we can rewrite this to make it more exciting.

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Comments: In this example, we focused on one defining characteristic of the person we are describing — her laugh. This strategy places more focus on the person you’re describing, rather than the adjectives you use to describe them.

4.   Edit and Revise

After you write your descriptive paragraph, be sure to read it over. Read it out loud. Read it in a funny voice. Doing this will help you to hear the words and identify which parts do not work or sound awkward.

5.   General Tips for Descriptive Writing

●  Avoid using too many descriptive words.

●  Remember to show the reader, not tell.

●  Appeal to the reader’s five senses – smell, touch, taste, sight, and sound.

●  Focus on a striking or defining characteristic.

●  Use contrasting details from other people or surroundings for emphasis.

●  Use literary devices (metaphors, similes etc.) sparingly and with intention.

●  Use a hook to reel your reader in.

●  Use a variety of short and long sentences.

●  Practice creative writing exercises to improve your descriptive writing skills.

●  Always edit and revise your writing.

If you need more help with writing a descriptive paragraph or essay , send your work to us! Our experts will proofread your first 500 words for free !

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Module 11: Speaking to Entertain and for Special Occasions

Award and acceptance speeches, learning objectives.

Define the characteristics of award speech.

Identify characteristics of an acceptance speech.

Presenting an Award

In an award speech, a speaker or emcee introduces an award and the winner. The introduction is meant to build excitement, and often the winner is not known until just before the award is to be presented.

Introduce yourself and thank the group or organization asking you to speak. Then name the award and explain briefly about the award you are presenting. Be sure to include the scope of the award, be it local, regional, national, or international.

Next explain what the winner accomplished to win this award. Did they write a paper or did they lead for a cause? Did they grow the largest pumpkin, finish first in a marathon, or bring community groups together to fight for justice? Your job is to present the facts and summarize the story behind their story.

Lastly, if there are other people in attendance who were competing with the winner, make sure to acknowledge them in the time you were allotted. Be sure to finish with the actual award presentation to the person or team, raising your voice and starting the applause after inviting them to receive their award.

Accepting an Award

An acceptance speech often follows an award speech and is given by the winner of the award.

An acceptance speech, like any other speech, should be prepared in advance. Thanking the givers of your award is your first order of business. State how much and why you are grateful for this honor, and if possible, name the people in the organization individually.

Then thank and give credit to those who helped you achieve the award including family, friends, mentors, and others who supported you in this endeavor. Include their names, their roles, and how their combined efforts made it possible for you to receive this honor. If you can’t name all the individuals, name the groups as time will allow.

Briefly share what the honor of the award means to you, and be generous with your praise and your gratitude toward your colleagues and the organizations involved. Smile and carefully look for directions on leaving the stage.

To Watch: Berta Cáceres, Goldman Prize acceptance speech

Environmental and indigenous-rights activist Berta Cáceres, co-founder of the Council of Popular and Indigenous Organizations of Honduras (COPINH), won the Goldman Prize for grassroots environmental activism is 2015 after organizing the Lenca people of Honduras to force the world’s largest dam builder to pull out of the Agua Zarca Dam project on the Río Gualcarque. Tragically, Cáceres was assassinated the following year.

You can view the transcript for “Berta Caceres acceptance speech, 2015 Goldman Prize ceremony” here (opens in new window) .

What to watch for:

In the case of winning an award for a social cause (in this case, environmental activism), it is common to focus on the severity of the problem at hand—that is, to shift the focus from yourself to the problem you are fighting against. Note how Cáceres begins by framing the cause within the belief system and worldview of the Lenca people. She then explains the mission of the organization she helped to found. Next she turns to her call to action: “¡Despertemos¡ ¡Despertemos Humanidad¡ Ya no hay tiempo.” (Let us wake up! Let us wake up, humanity! We’re out of time.) The ending of her speech reminds us that gratitude and humility are the most important elements of an acceptance speech. If thanks aren’t in line with the gravity of the topic, a dedication can serve a similar purpose: “Dedico este premio a todas las rebeldías, a mi madre, al Pueblo Lenca, a Río Blanco y a las y los mártires por la defensa de los bienes naturales.” (I dedicate this award to all the rebels, to my mother, to the Lenca People, to the Río Blanco, and to all the martyrs who gave their lives in the struggle to defend our natural resources.)

  • Berta Caceres acceptance speech, 2015 Goldman Prize ceremony. Provided by : Goldman Environmental Prize. Located at : https://youtu.be/AR1kwx8b0ms . License : Other . License Terms : Standard YouTube License
  • Award and Acceptance Speeches. Authored by : Patricia Atkinson with Lumen Learning. License : CC BY: Attribution

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How to Write a Memorable Tribute Speech: Step-By-Step

Updated 07/16/2021

Published 11/16/2019

Sam Tetrault, BA in English

Sam Tetrault, BA in English

Contributing writer

Unsure of what to include in your tribute speech? Here is a step-by-step guide and some examples to get you started.

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A tribute takes on so many different meanings, it can be hard to remember what it’s supposed to be. But when you write a tribute speech, you can get to its true purpose, which is to honor a specific person. Usually, you can hear tribute speeches at funerals, memorials, and celebrations -- but all tend to follow a similar formula.

Here are some helpful steps for writing a tribute speech:

  • Think About the Person
  • Write an Outline
  • Get the Audience’s Attention
  • Make Your Points
  • Finish Strong
  • Practice Your Speech

Also see our tribute speech topic ideas and tribute speech samples below for some ideas to get you started.

If you’re speaking at a funeral or at a memorial, you might need to write a tribute speech. Or even if you’re speaking at a celebration and simply focusing this piece on a loved one who has died, this guide is for you. 

You want your tribute speech to use the right words and to paint an accurate, admirable picture of the person. A heartfelt speech evokes emotion in the listeners and conveys a clear message.

Tip : While speaking at a virtual event, like a live-streamed memorial organized by a service such as GatheringUs , practice your speech using your video conferencing software ahead of time so you can anticipate and fix any audio issues.

Post-loss tip:  If you are the executor for a deceased loved one, the emotional and technical aspects of handling their unfinished business can be overwhelming without a way to organize your process. We have a post-loss checklist  that will help you ensure that your loved one's family, estate, and other affairs are taken care of.

Step 1: Think About the Person

What purpose does your tribute speech serve? Are you sharing a particular moment in a loved one’s life, writing about their successes, or about their positive attributes? Do you want the audience to come away with a particular message or understanding of your loved one?

Brainstorm a few characteristics or key points you’d like to include in the tribute speech. With these kinds of speeches, it’s ok to evoke emotion and share that feeling with your audience. What emotions do you want your audience to feel? If you’re giving your speech at a memorial, you might want your words to highlight a sense of fondness or happiness. Make sure you are considering your audience as well as the person you’re writing about.

After all, writing a tribute speech for your mother will be very different than writing one for a friend.

Share your final wishes, just in case.

Create a free Cake end-of-life planning profile and instantly share your health, legal, funeral, and legacy decisions with a loved one.

Step 2: Write an Outline

Tribute speech outline example

Before you begin writing, create an outline. Writing an outline helps you organize your thoughts before putting pen to paper. Most tribute speeches follow the same format. Here’s a quick guideline to follow:

  • Introduction: Who is the speech about? What is your relation to this person?
  • Main point 1: Start off with a key characteristic of the person you’re talking about, such as their caring nature or listening skills.
  • Evidence: What evidence do you have that supports your main point? For instance, if they were a caring person, talk about a time they helped others.
  • Main point 2: What’s another point you’d like to make about the person?
  • Evidence: Again, support your point.
  • Conclusion: Repeat your crucial points and end with something meaningful.

You can include as many main points as you’d wish, but less is usually more. If you’re giving a speech at a funeral, there may be time limits to consider. Knowing what to say when someone dies is never easy. Using an outline organizes your thoughts in a clear way no matter the purpose of your speech. 

Step 3: Get the Audience’s Attention

The hardest part of a tribute speech is often the introduction. How do you capture the audience’s attention? If your speech is during a funeral, for instance, emotions are already high. If you’re giving a speech at another event or celebration, you similarly need to capture attention. How do you hook listeners with your tribute?

Start by relating to the listeners themselves. You need to appeal to the audience on a personal level to develop a connection with your words. If you’re speaking at a funeral, remind them how the deceased person brought everyone together. Open with your relationship with this person, and talk about your loved one’s role in your life. 

A good way to start is with a personal story. Humans naturally are drawn to stories. Including one at the beginning of your speech brings the audience closer to you. From there, it’s easier to share your main points with the listeners’ full attention. 

Step 4: Make Your Points

Tip on writing a tribute speech with image of the ocean in the background

It might be tempting to drag out your introduction, especially if you’re using a personal take to capture the audience’s attention. Consider keeping the introduction brief so you can get to your point sooner rather than later. A concisely worded speech makes more of an impact through brevity and pauses than long drawn-out sentences.

With a tribute speech, you might include any of the following:

  • The person’s characteristics
  • The person’s accomplishments
  • The person’s lasting impact
  • Your experience with the person

All of these need real-life evidence. Memories, attributes, and physical creations provide plenty of support for what your loved one did in their life, and how they made you feel. How you share these main points is up to you.

Consider how you knew this person personally. Do you have a particularly funny or touching memory that was not shared widely? Did you see a special side of this person? These are all valuable questions to answer when writing a memorial tribute.

Step 5: Finish Strong

Finish your tribute speech on a high note. Popular quotes or poems can provide a way to tie up your speech. Or even ending with a quote or familiar saying from your loved one can leave your audience fondly remembering the person. Wrapping up your tribute speech can also be used to recall your main points and making a final statement about the person. 

You might ask the audience to remember their own favorite memory of this person or to think of them when they visit a certain place. Either way, leave them with something memorable.

Step 6: Practice Your Speech

Finally, before you present, it’s time to practice. If you’re anxious, use these tips to put you at ease:

  • Think of your speech as a performance, not just a reading
  • Make eye contact with your audience
  • Stand up straight and tall
  • Focus on your storytelling skills
  • Let your passion show

As long as you’re putting emotion into the topic, this shines through for the audience. Practice really does make perfect. Don’t be afraid to share your speech with your friends and family before the big day.

Tribute Speech Topic Ideas

For inspiration planning your tribute speech, review these topic ideas below. Your tribute can be about anything that matters to you.

  • Write about a physical tribute to made for your favorite person. 
  • Write about a loved one who passed. 
  • Describe an event involving yourself and a loved one. 
  • Share a memory.
  • Give a tribute to a place that matters to you.
  • What movie or book inspired you?
  • Did an incident ever change your life?
  • Give a toast to someone who matters to you. 
  • Share someone or something that changed your mind. 
  • Explain the relationships that mean the most to you.

Tribute Speech Samples

Quote from a sample tribute speech

To get a strong feel for what a tribute speech looks like, read through these samples below. Each speech serves a different purpose, but you’ll see how they impact the audience through storytelling and compassion. 

Tribute to a friend after their passing

"Good evening, everyone. Thank you for joining me to celebrate the life of my dear friend, Julian. All of us here admired Julian’s devotion to his family. I first met Julian through his wife, Stephanie. There was never a time when he wasn’t raving about Stephanie and all of their adventures together. I remember specifically one late night at work. Julian was the first to tell the whole office to head home. He always said nothing was more important than family, and that was certainly true. That’s the legacy Julian leaves behind: his shining family. I know we’ll all remember him even though he’s no longer with us. We still see Julian in his son and daughter, Mark and Mandy. Let’s make sure he’s never forgotten."

Tribute to a coworker "Thanks for joining me at this year’s celebration. Today, I’d like to highlight the success of Luisa, one of our best underwriters. Luisa is dedicated to her clients and helping them secure the home of their dreams. When Luisa first began working here, she would spend hours pouring over each applicant’s documents. She wanted to get everything right the first time. “The family is counting on us,” she would say. Luisa is right. It’s this kind of passion and attention to detail that makes her such an asset to our company."

Tribute to a sibling for a wedding

"I’m so thankful to be speaking about June on her wedding day. June and I have known each other for basically our whole lives, give or take the two years of me being an only child. Since then, June has always been the one who had my back. From the playground to college, she was always there. June is the first person I want to tell about my day — even if she’s bad at answering her phone! I am so grateful for our special bond. I just wanted to say thank you to my little sister for being my rock.:

Write a Powerful Tribute Speech

With the steps and examples listed above, hopefully you have some inspiration to help you write a top-notch tribute speech. From learning how to hook listeners to find the right words to say, you have many paths you can take with a tribute.

And in the end, a tribute speech is a commemoration of someone special. Whether you’re giving your speech as a sympathy message at a funeral or at a celebration, make the most of this opportunity. 

Everyone deserves to be remembered. Creating a tribute speech is a powerful way to evoke emotion and build strong relationships. They are for personal and professional relationships, remembering those who have died, and even just reminding us of the things we love most. It’s time to put your own pen to paper in honor of someone special. 

For more help finding the right words, read our guide to what to say on a death anniversary .

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Lesson Plan: Teaching the Prompt “A Person You Admire”

Your mom, your math teacher, your dentist- Who is the person you admire?

Favorite Person Prompt:

We all have a favorite person, someone who we like or respect more than anyone else. Think about the person in your life you consider your favorite. What is this person like? What does this person do to make him or her your favorite? Write an essay about this person explaining what he or she is like and the things that he or she does that makes him or her so special to you.

As you write, remember your essay will be scored based on how well you:

• Develop a multi-paragraph response to the assigned topic that clearly communicates your controlling idea to the audience • Support your controlling idea with meaningful examples, reasons, and information based upon your research or readings. • Organize your essay in a clear and logical manner, including an introduction, body, and conclusion. • Use well-structured sentences and language that are appropriate for your audience. • Edit your work to conform to the conventions of standard American English.

Duration: 2 class periods of 45-55 minutes Adaptation: Upper Elementary (4-5), “A Person You Admire” Prompt, Expository Writing Printable: “Favorite Person” Lesson Plan, Middle School (6-8), Expository Writing

Teacher Background: Allison Whittenberg writes young adult novels that deal with the importance of having special people in our lives during difficult times. Her novels Sweet Thang and Life is Fine offer us a look how special people in our lives can make a difference. Read a transcript and listen to an interview at Author Series: Interview with Allison Whittenberg .

Day One: Who is Your Favorite Person? (offline)

1)    Students use their writer’s journal to tell about someone in their life who is important to them and to explain what makes this person so special. (5 minutes) 2)    Students use a concept map organizer (see below) to organize the traits and actions of the person that they have written about in their journal. Students should think of things this person has said and done that has earned them this special place in their lives. (8 minutes) 3)    Teacher plays the audio file “Philadelphia and Role Models” from Author Series: Interview with Allison Whittenberg. What does Whittenberg say about role models? How are her comments relevant to the students’ experience of role models? (12 minutes) 4)    Each student imagines that their favorite person is being honored with an award, and he or she has been asked to give a speech about that person. Students outline what they would say about this person’s character, admirable traits, and accomplishments, using the Prewriting Handout: Organize Your Essay . (20 minutes) 5)    For homework, students write a first draft of their speech. This need not be typed.

Day 2: Peer Revision (offline)

1)    Students come to class prepared with their first draft. 2)    In groups of three or four, students take turns reading their drafts aloud. The student reading is referred to as the “writer.” The other students are “critics.” As the writers read their work, the critics take notes (that they will later share with the writer), considering the following questions:

•    What is the relationship between the writer and their favorite person? •    What has the “favorite person” done to earn this position in the writer’s eyes? •    What was the most vivid example that the writer used? •    Are there any questions that the writer left unanswered? What more would you like to know? (15 minutes)

3)    Following the reading of the speech (i.e., the expository essay), the critics discuss their responses to the above questions. The writer listens carefully, taking notes. (10 minutes) 4)    After everyone has shared with their group, each group selects one writer to read his/her draft to the class. The writer and his/her critics then highlight three points of feedback about that specific essay. (20 minutes)

Day Three: Attacking the Prompt (online)

1)    Using their prewriting materials and peer feedback from the day before to guide them, students begin drafting their essay in MY Access! Teacher circulates throughout the classroom or computer lab, spending a few minutes with each student discussing the direction of his/her essay. If they wish, students may submit once after 20 minutes. After a student has submitted, the teacher should focus his/her instruction on making sure that the student understands the feedback he/she received. For example, if a student has a revision goal that states, “Use transitional words to help connect your ideas,” you may conduct a mini-lesson in which you introduce them to Transient Transitions . (30 minutes) 2)    Students submit again. They should receive a holistic score and, paging down, should find “My Tutor Revision Goals.” Students should select two revision goals and write the goals in their writers’ journals as reminders. (3 minutes) 3)    Teacher asks students for one revision goal and copies it onto the board. Teacher reviews any necessary vocabulary, like “thesis statement.” Students suggest strategies for how one would complete the example revision goal. For example, if the revision goal is “Understand and write for your audience,” students might suggest, “You should tell some jokes about your favorite person,” or “You should be respectful at all times.” (7 minutes) 4)    Using the Revision Plan Guidelines, students copy their revision goals under MY Goals. Then, considering his/her specific essay, each student brainstorms strategies to achieve his/her goals. Teacher circulates throughout the classroom, ensuring that each student fully understands his/her goals. (10 minutes) 5)    Students may begin working on an additional draft of their essays for homework.

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16+ Award Speech Examples in PDF

Award Speech Examples

You may have already seen on television or have seen it right before your eyes that when someone would give and receive an award, they would say more than just a word of thanks in front of an audience. The speech they deliver is called as an award acceptance and award presentation speech. When it is your time to receive an award, you might have a difficulty in writing your award acceptance speech and the same thing goes when you would be awarding someone. This article gives you ten award acceptance and ten awards presentation speech examples that can help you in creating your own speech for one of your most memorable moment of your life.

award speech

Award Acceptance Speech Sample

1 acceptance speech final text with photos

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Award Acceptance Speech

2 menasce michelson acceptance

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Mandela Award Recipient Speech

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Wilder Award Acceptance Speech

4 wilder 2015speech

Size: 1.4 MB

Steps on Writing for Your Award Presentation Speech

Before the recipient of an award could receive his or her award, someone would be presenting the award first. If you are assigned to deliver an award presentation speech and that you do not know where to begin, make use of this simple steps to guide you in writing and preparing for your award presentation speech to help you get started.

1. The Introduction

In the introduction part of your speech , you can present both of the award and the recipient of the award. For the award, you can make a brief statement of the category and for the recipient of the award, you can introduce him or her in a mysterious fashion like you would be describing the person first, what he or she does that could or could not be related with the award he or she is going to receive. Make sure that you would keep the introduction part of your speech brief and simple but it would already build up the framework of your entire award presentation speech.

2. The Body of the Speech

It is in the body of the speech that you would be further describing the award and what were the requirements for achieving the ward. This is also the part where you would e introducing more in-depth information about the recipient of the award and this is finally the part where you would be mentioning the recipient of the award. You can also include mentioning the list of the other awards that the recipient has received. There are some that we call a veteran in receiving awards that he or she has a lot of awards received in his or her lifetime that mentioning their long list of awards might take up the entire awards ceremony. That is why you have to make sure that you are only choosing the significant awards that he or she has received and it is suggested that the ones worth mentioning are the awards that are similar or close to what the awardee will be receiving in the current awarding ceremony.

3. The Conclusion of the Speech

The main purpose of the conclusion of your award presentation speech should only be one thing and that is to induce a sound of applause from your audience to welcome the recipient of the award on stage.

Award Acceptance Speeches

Education award acceptance speech.

education award acceptance speech1

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Service Award Acceptance Speech

service award acceptance speech

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Career Award Acceptance Speech

10 fuhrmanacceptance

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Award Presentation Speeches

Sample award presentation speech.

11 speech 06 768

Size: 66.5 KB

Ceremony Award Presentation Speech

12 presentationspeech2

Size: 129.3 KB

Awards Ceremony Presentation Speech

13 petrakis awards speech

Size: 312.4 KB

Enginerring Heritage Award Presentation Speech

14 eha presentation speeches

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Prize Presentation Speech

15 vcs speech during the prize giving ceremony

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What to Keep in Mind When Writing for Your Award Acceptance Speech

1. list down the people you have to give thanks.

The first step in writing your award acceptance speech is to simply list down. List down the people that have to be recognized for helping you in your path to achieving the award. This might sound like it is an obligation to mention people in order to thank them but when you feel so much gratitude in your heart for winning an award, you might want to thank even the cook that made the food you bought during the times when you were still at the process of aiming the award.

2. Reminisce your struggles and mini-victories before achieving the award

It is good to reminisce all your struggles and hardships while you were still aiming for the award. You can get sentimental and you might even cry in front of the audience but be reminiscing all the things you’ve done in order to achieve one of your goals can be fulfilling. It can also inspire people to continue paving the path towards achieving their goals when they are starting to lose hope.

3.  Read other award acceptance speeches for inspiration

If you have a hard time thinking how to start your award acceptance speech, you can always get inspiration from previous award acceptance speeches that are similar to the kind of award that you will be receiving. This article provides you ten award acceptance speeches you can get inspiration from and you can also search for more on the internet.

High School Science Award Presentation Speech

16 high school science award presentation speech

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Fund Awards Presentation Speech

17 2016 3 15 speech e ned

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Presentation Speech and Script for Emcee

18 emcee script level 1

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Principal’s Presentation of Award Speech to Graduates

19 2015 prize giving speech principal

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Presentation of Award Speech to Parent and Learners

20 principals address award ceremony 2013

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Tips for Delivering Your Award Acceptance Speech

To be recognized for your all your hardships is the best feeling in the world but not all people are actually aiming to deliver an award acceptance speech. Here are some tips that can help you in achieving that perfect award acceptance speech delivery that your audience might think that you need another award for it.

1. Just keep it short and simple. Award acceptance speeches are not necessarily long. You just have to be straight to the point in thanking the people you need to be thinking and if there are a lot, just give them a general term like family, friends, and colleagues.

2. Just keep on practicing especially if you already knew that you would be receiving an award. It reduces stress, anxiety, and any nervous feelings.

3. Keep in mind the purpose of an award acceptance speech an that is to give appreciation for having received the award

4. You can inspire and preach in your award acceptance speech but do not go overboard that you award acceptance speech would not anymore sound like an award acceptance speech.

5. Know beforehand that time limit given for every awardee so that you would know how long your speech should be and that you would not be able to have an overtime and steal other people’s time in delivering a speech.

6. Share how the award can change your life and whether you would keep on achieving similar awards in the future.

7. Like with any speeches, always add spices to your ending. You can end it with a bang, end with a quote to live by your audience, and you can also end it with another situation that would make the audience ponder. You can end it in whatever way you want as long as you do the most important thing–make your audience remember who you are and what you are capable of.

how to write a speech about someone you admire

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Michael Glennon sits in a library

“The remedy for falsehoods is more speech, not enforced silence,” says Michael Glennon, professor of constitutional and international law at The Fletcher School. Photo: Pierre Chiha

An Argument for Free Speech, the “Lifeblood of Democracy”

A Fletcher professor makes the case against censorship in a provocative new book

Free speech is the heart of democracy. But who decides what speech should be free?

Michael Glennon , professor of constitutional and international law at The Fletcher School, has been troubled by a growing trend to censor speech, from college campuses to social media to the halls of government itself. In a provocative new book, Free Speech and Turbulent Freedom: The Dangerous Allure of Censorship in the Digital Era , he argues that such bans—while often well-meaning—are almost always counterproductive, creating more problems than they solve.

The book’s sweeping argument runs from 19th-century Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., who set the foundations of First Amendment law, all the way to the most recent social media controversies.

Glennon spoke with Tufts Now about the importance of free speech and why he believes a “marketplace of ideas” is the best antidote to tyranny.

In your introduction, you describe the change you’ve observed in students over the last few years when it comes to free speech. How did that inspire you to write this book?

Students’ attitudes toward free speech have changed dramatically. Nationwide, over half of college students believe that schools shouldn’t allow a speaker on campus who has previously expressed ideas they intensely dislike, and over 30% believe it’s acceptable to drown out speakers to prevent them from speaking.

Many of these students think that suppressing free speech is somehow necessary to preserve democracy. I wrote the book to suggest that this view is profoundly and dangerously mistaken.

Freedom of speech is the lifeblood of democracy. They both rest on the same premise: that people are able to sort out for themselves what’s true and what’s false, and that it’s for individuals, not the government, to judge what’s in their own best interests.

“Censorship inevitably backfires. … Censorship alienates the public, generates distrust, fosters social division, and sparks political instability.” Professor Michael Glennon Share on Twitter

You devote the first part of the book to Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. and his journey into skepticism about universal morality. To whom is that relevant today?

Many of today’s students have a keen thirst for social justice, which I admire. When Holmes was their age, he shared that thirst, dropping out of college to enlist in the Union Army in a war against slavery, in which he was nearly killed several times.

He became very skeptical of people who believe they have unique access to universal, absolute truth, who view their adversaries as evil incarnate. That, he believed, leads ultimately to violence.

All of us today need to approach public debate with a bit of humility, recognizing that none of us is infallible and that rigid moral certitude leads down a dangerous path.

You argue that government censorship is wrong and even counterproductive. What are some of the reasons?

We know from centuries of experience, in many countries, that censorship inevitably backfires. It discredits the censors, who are seen as patronizing elites. It demeans listeners who are told they can’t handle the truth. It makes martyrs and heroes out of the censored and drives their speech underground where it’s harder to rebut.

Suffragettes, civil rights leaders, and LGBTQ+ activists all have relied on free speech to get their messages out. Censorship alienates the public, generates distrust, fosters social division, and sparks political instability.

It’s not that some speech isn’t harmful—it’s that trying to suppress it causes greater harm.

Many people would probably be surprised to learn that hate speech such as marching with Nazi paraphernalia or burning a cross at a demonstration deriding Black and Jewish people is protected under the First Amendment. Why is it protected?

Not all hateful speech is protected. Incitement to violence, fighting words, defamation, and true threats are all often hateful yet that speech is not protected. But other hateful speech is protected, for several reasons.

Hatred is a viewpoint. It’s for the individual to think and feel as he or she wishes; it’s only when the individual crosses the line between thought and action to incite violence or defame or threaten someone that the state can intervene.

Hate speech laws are also invariably vague and overbroad, leading to arbitrary and abusive enforcement. In the real world, speech rarely gets punished because it hurts disadvantaged minorities. It gets punished because it hurts dominant majorities.

Many Americans feel it is OK to ban clearly false information online, but you argue that would be a bad idea. Why?

The ultimate problem with banning falsehoods is that to do so you’d need an official Ministry of Truth, which could come up with an endless list of officially banned falsehoods. Not only would that list inevitably be self-serving, but it could be wrong.

Even when it comes to clear falsehoods, there are reasons to leave them up. [Former President Donald] Trump claimed, for example, that the size of the crowd at his inauguration was larger than [former President Barack] Obama’s, which was indisputably false. But the statement had the effect of calling into question not only Trump’s veracity but also his mental soundness, which is important for voters to assess.

You say after Trump’s participation in the January 6 uprising, social media platforms banned him for the wrong reasons. What do you mean?

They were wrong to apply a norm of international human rights law in banning him—a supposed prohibition against “glorifying violence.” That’s a vague, overly broad standard that can pick up everything from praising Medal of Honor winners to producing Top Gun .

We’re dealing here with an American president speaking from the White House to the American people, so I say the proper standard should have been the U.S. First Amendment and whether Trump intended to incite imminent violence and whether that violence was likely. Under that test, I think it’s a close case.

What was wrong with the way the government tried to curb “misinformation” about COVID-19?

Justice Louis Brandeis [who served on the Supreme Court from 1916 to 1939] said that the fitting remedy for evil counsels is good ones.

If someone counsels drinking bleach to cure COVID, the remedy is not to suppress it—it’s to point out why that’s wrong. But over and over, the government’s remedy for speech it didn’t like was to strongarm social media platforms to take it down.

The government wouldn’t have lost so much credibility if it had only said, “This is our best guess based on available evidence.” Instead, it spoke ex cathedra on masks, lockdowns, school closings, vaccine efficacy, infection rates, myocarditis, social distancing, you name it—claims that often turned out to be untenable—and then it bullied the platforms to censor prominent experts who took issue with its misinformation.

Many commentators are worried about disinformation and AI-generated “deep fakes” affecting the outcome of the 2024 election. What’s the best remedy for that?

The remedy for falsehoods is more speech, not enforced silence. If someone thinks a social media post contains altered imagery or audio, the initial solution is simply to say that and let the marketplace of ideas sort it out.  

Obviously counter-speech isn’t always the answer: You still run into eleventh-hour deep fakes that there’s no time to rebut. People do have privacy rights and interference with elections undercuts democracy.

The trick is to write legislation that catches malign fakery but doesn’t also pick up satire and humor that is obviously bogus. That’s not easy. Well-intended but sloppy laws often trigger serious unintended consequences.

Michael Glennon in his office in 2014

Shadow Government

illustration of a woman bombarded by negative speech bubbles

The High Cost of Online Attacks Against Women

Sarah Sobieraj and Jeffrey Berry

My Way or the Highway

IMAGES

  1. 💐 How to write an essay about someone you admire. How to write a speech about someone i admire

    how to write a speech about someone you admire

  2. The Business Of Self Introduction Speech

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  3. The Person I Admire The Most Essay Example (300 Words)

    how to write a speech about someone you admire

  4. The Person I Admire The Most Essay

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  5. Someone I admire

    how to write a speech about someone you admire

  6. How to Write a Speech About Someone I Admire

    how to write a speech about someone you admire

VIDEO

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  3. Advice If You’re New to Real Estate

  4. write speech on self confidence

  5. How To End Your Speech The RIGHT Way 🎤 #shorts

  6. Personal Speech

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Speech About Someone I Admire

    Create an outline that will touch on your key points. Consider the person and jot down what comes to mind when you concentrate on the individual as well as how he or she has made an impact on you and others. If it is a family member, reach into the past and showcase some of his or her early experiences.

  2. Someone I admire

    Skills Writing B1 writing Someone I admire Someone I admire Look at the description and do the exercises to improve your writing skills. Instructions Preparation Someone I admire My cousin Laura Someone I admire is my cousin Laura. She's five years older than me, so she's 19 now and she lives in Bristol.

  3. Descriptive Essay About A Person You Admire

    1. The Basics of Descriptive Essay 2. How to Write a Descriptive Essay About Someone You Admire 3. Descriptive Essay About a Person You Admire Examples 4. Key Points for Writing A Descriptive Essay On The Person I Admire The Most The Basics of Descriptive Essay

  4. How to Write a Speech About Someone I Admire

    Move along steadily. After the attention grabber, move into introducing your subject and giving some general overall reasons why this person deserves praise and recognition. Use a transition to bridge your introduction and body paragraphs, such as: "And therefore, I want to briefly mention a few reasons why I hold Mr. King in such high esteem."

  5. Authentic Compliments for Any Person

    1 "Your perspective on life makes me want to live more thoughtfully." This statement tells your friend that you admire how they carry themselves through life. For example, they might choose to see the silver lining in difficult situations or be mindful about setting boundaries at work.

  6. Speaking about a person you admire

    Speaking about a person you admire Level B1 / B2 (Intermediate / Upper-intermediate) Age Teenagers and adults Time 40-60 mins Procedure Preparation Read this plan, and familiarise yourself with the topic. Make copies of worksheets.

  7. How to Write a Speech About Someone I Admire

    To can be a moving experience to write a speech about person you admire. Thereto can also feel favorite an overwhelmingly endeavor, particularly if you are relatively new to the nuancing of speech writing. Gathering facts, tapping into emotion and spending time on crafting the body determination make a great speech.

  8. Describe a Person You Admire

    You may need to describe a person you admire on IELTS Speaking Part 2, and you need to be ready with high level vocabulary! Today you'll get a band 9 Speakin...

  9. Speaking skills: A person you admire

    Admiration is the feeling of respect that you have for someone because of what they have done or a personal quality that they possess. We would like you to tell us about a person that you admire. This person can be a footballer, a sports person, a celebrity, a politician, someone in your family or someone you know.

  10. Here's How to Write a Perfect Speech

    Step 3: Edit and polish what you've written until you have a cohesive first draft of your speech. Step 4: Practice, practice, practice. The more you practice your speech the more you'll discover which sections need reworked, which transitions should be improved, and which sentences are hard to say. You'll also find out how you're doing ...

  11. Describe a person you admire

    You should say: who he/ she is how you know him/ her what characteristics this person has and explain why you admire this person. [You will have to talk about the topic for one to two minutes. You have one minute to think about what you're going to say. You can make some notes to help you if you wish.] Model Answer 1:

  12. How to Write a Descriptive Paragraph About a Person (With ...

    1. Brainstorm Your Ideas. Brainstorming is crucial to any writing process. It's the process in which you think of ideas for what you'd like to write about. In this case, you're writing a descriptive paragraph about a person. It's important to use adjectives to describe the features or characteristics you want to focus on.

  13. Award and Acceptance Speeches

    An acceptance speech often follows an award speech and is given by the winner of the award. An acceptance speech, like any other speech, should be prepared in advance. Thanking the givers of your award is your first order of business. State how much and why you are grateful for this honor, and if possible, name the people in the organization ...

  14. How to Write a Memorable Tribute Speech: Step-By-Step

    Here are some helpful steps for writing a tribute speech: Get the Audience's Attention tribute speech topic ideas below for some ideas to get you started. If you're or at a memorial, you might need to write a tribute speech.

  15. Lesson Plan: Teaching the Prompt "A Person You Admire"

    Write an essay about this person explaining what he or she is like and the things that he or she does that makes him or her so special to you. As you write, remember your essay will be scored based on how well you: • Develop a multi-paragraph response to the assigned topic that clearly communicates your controlling idea to the audience

  16. How To Praise Someone Professionally (36 Ways You Can Do It)

    2. Consider your timing. It's important to time your compliments well. Don't wait too long before offering praise. When someone does a good job, let them know as soon as possible. Alternatively, if you know someone is having a bad day, giving them an authentic compliment can greatly boost their mood. 3.

  17. examples of a speech about someone you admire

    A dedication speech is a commemorative speech that honors an individual and has a focus on admiration and respect. A dedication speech for a classmate should highlight the positive qualities of that person which led to the dedication.... Writing a dedication speech requires the writer to be both inspiring and celebratory, helping to unite the audience in admiration for the subject the speech ...

  18. 150 Best Positive Compliments For Praising Someone Anywhere

    You have a good head on your shoulders. You are a great teacher because you are so patient and understanding with your explanation. You are so bright, and I appreciate you for not looking down on me while I learn new things. I love how you speak about your passion for [subject] and teach me about it.

  19. Award Speech

    What to Keep in Mind When Writing for Your Award Acceptance Speech. 1. List down the people you have to give thanks. The first step in writing your award acceptance speech is to simply list down. List down the people that have to be recognized for helping you in your path to achieving the award. This might sound like it is an obligation to ...

  20. 13 Conversation Starters That Will Get You Talking With Someone You Admire

    1. 'I really like your work." From movie stars to CEOs to authors to researchers, this opener works with nearly anyone. It tells people you've been paying attention to them--and in today's over ...

  21. PDF Writing skills practice: Someone I admire exercises

    2. Check your writing: grouping - vocabulary about appearance Write the words in the correct group. Some words can be added to more than one group. long tall brown blue wavy green overweight average build grey short straight slim curly blond shoulder-length medium height eyes hair height build

  22. Someone Famous Or Someone You Admire

    INTRO: Who the person is. a famous person (Son Tung, Adele, Jennie) In this passage, I'm going to write a biography of Adele, a famous English singer whom I have admired for many years. BODY: When and where he/she was born Facts about his/her childhood and early life Why he/she became well known Why you admire this person

  23. How to write a speech about someone i admire Free Essays

    WHAT your speech is going to be about (its topic) 3. HOW long it needs to be eg. 3 minutes‚ 5 minutes... The basic speech format is very simple. It consists of three parts: 1. an opening or introduction 2. the body where the bulk of the information is given 3. and an ending (or summary). Think of it as a sandwich.

  24. An Argument for Free Speech, the "Lifeblood of Democracy"

    Freedom of speech is the lifeblood of democracy. They both rest on the same premise: that people are able to sort out for themselves what's true and what's false, and that it's for individuals, not the government, to judge what's in their own best interests. "Censorship inevitably backfires. …. Censorship alienates the public ...