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Write a Cover Letter as a Teenager

How to Write a Cover Letter as a Teenager: Tips and Templates

Tips for writing a cover letter as a teenager.

  • Start with a strong opening: The opening sentence of your cover letter should grab the reader’s attention and make them want to read on. Consider starting with a relevant anecdote or a statement that highlights your enthusiasm for the job.
  • Highlight your relevant skills and experiences: Even if you don’t have much work experience, you likely have skills and experiences that are relevant to the job you’re applying for. Think about your volunteer work, extracurricular activities, and any other experiences that have helped you develop skills that would be useful in the job.
  • Show your personality: While you want to maintain a professional tone, don’t be afraid to show some personality in your cover letter. This can help you stand out from other applicants and give potential employers a sense of who you are as a person.
  • Use specific examples: Instead of simply listing your skills and experiences, use specific examples to demonstrate how you’ve applied those skills in the past. This can help you make a stronger case for why you’re the right person for the job.
  • Close with a strong statement: The closing sentence of your cover letter should be a strong statement that leaves a lasting impression. Consider thanking the employer for their time, expressing your enthusiasm for the job, or reiterating why you believe you’re a strong candidate.

Cover Letter Templates for Teenagers

  • First-time job seeker cover letter template:
  • Cover letter template for part-time job:

Cover Letter Dos and Don’ts

  • Customize your cover letter for each job and company
  • Highlight your skills and experience
  • Use a professional format
  • Proofread and edit your cover letter
  • Use a generic cover letter
  • Focus solely on your education or grades
  • Use unprofessional language or slang
  • Submit your cover letter without proofreading and

Common Mistakes to Avoid in Teen Cover Letters

  • Over-explaining your lack of experience: While it’s important to acknowledge your lack of experience, it’s not necessary to go into great detail about it. Focus on highlighting the skills and experiences you do have that make you a good fit for the job.
  • Using informal language: Avoid using slang or overly casual language in your cover letter. It’s important to maintain a professional tone throughout.
  • Neglecting to research the company: Showing that you’ve done your research on the company and the job you’re applying for is crucial. Make sure to highlight how your skills and experiences align with the company’s mission and values.
  • Being too generic: Your cover letter should be tailored to the specific job you’re applying for. Avoid using a generic template or copy-pasting the same cover letter for every job you apply to.

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Example Cover Letter for Teenager

Land a job that can kick-start your successful career with this proficiently-written cover letter sample for teens. You can use this example at no cost or easily modify it in our intuitive cover letter builder.

Milan Šaržík — Certified Professional Résumé Writer

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Example Cover Letter for Teenager (Full Text Version)

Andrew Berlington

To whom it may concern,

Thank you for the opportunity to submit my application for the Sales Associate job within MERG Corporation, LLC which has been posted and advertised on LinkedIn.com. I am certain that I would be a great contribution to your team and what is more, I believe that my qualifications would help me to meet and exceed all your expectations and goals.

As stated in my attached CV, I worked as a Part-time Sales Assistant at PCV Computers & Electronics, LLC for more than 2 years. There, I was mainly responsible for communicating with browsing customers, providing professional recommendations and advice to them, and collecting and processing payments. Additionally, I maintained and organized a clean work area, assisted in the stock and inventory management, trained new personnel, and executed multiple clerical tasks as required. Throughout the years, I have demonstrated numerous times that I am a dedicated and reliable person with the important ability to function well in fast-paced and deadline-driven team environments.

Next, I am a third-year high school student at Marshfield High School. Besides achieving extraordinary academic results (4.0 GPA) and being engaged in multiple extracurricular activities, I also serve as a Social Media Account Manager. This tremendous experience has allowed me to become a pro-active individual and helped me to acquire excellent time management skills. Finally, I am adept at using all software programs necessary for the role, such as Epos Now, Mastersoft, and MS Office. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions on my career history. I can be reached at 555-555-5555 or via email at [email protected]. Thank you for your time and consideration and I look forward to hearing back from you soon.

Kind regards,

High School Student

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 23.2 percent of high school students participated in the labor force in October 2021. Besides gaining work experience for your further career growth, having a job can certainly teach you valuable skills, such as teamwork, leadership, or cooperation. That said, it is only natural that many high school students are eager job seekers. And there is no better way to land a job than to advertise yourself with a professionally written cover letter.

Milan Šaržík — Certified Professional Résumé Writer

Milan Šaržík, CPRW

Milan’s work-life has been centered around job search for the past three years. He is a Certified Professional Résumé Writer (CPRW™) as well as an active member of the Professional Association of Résumé Writers & Careers Coaches (PARWCC™). Milan holds a record for creating the most career document samples for our help center – until today, he has written more than 500 resumes and cover letters for positions across various industries. On top of that, Milan has completed studies at multiple well-known institutions, including Harvard University, University of Glasgow, and Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.

Edit this sample using our resume builder.

Don’t struggle with your cover letter. artificial intelligence can write it for you..

Don’t struggle with your cover letter. Artificial intelligence can write it for you.

Similar job positions

Natural Sciences Student Student Internship Humanities Student Social Sciences Student High School Student Formal Sciences Student Professions And Applied Sciences Student University Student

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how to write a cover letter for a 14 year old

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Cover Letter Examples for Students

Now that you have completed your resume, you are ready to apply for jobs. You have noticed from the advertisements you have been looking at that you are going to have to include a cover letter for some of the jobs you are applying for. While you are relieved that your resume is done, you are now not sure where to start when writing a cover letter.

Fortunately, there is help available.  This blog post will cover the following:

  • How to write a cover letter when you are a student
  • Important things to look for when proofreading your cover letter
  • Where to find a cover letter examples for students

How to Write a Cover Letter When You are a Student

While writing a cover letter may sound scary at first, you will soon see that it is not that difficult. This blog post will walk you through the process and provide you with examples of cover letters that will help you create one of your own.

To start, choose a job that you are interested in applying for. Review the ad or job posting closely so that you can get a good idea of what the employer is looking for.  For some jobs, this will be easy to figure out as the ad or job posting will offer plenty of detail. It will be a bit more challenging when applying for a job where the ad or posting is very general and you might have to do some additional research.

Aside from having a good understanding of the job you are applying for, you will also want to get some background information on the employer you are looking to be hired by. You will want to do your best to learn what is important to the employer in those that they hire, so that you can consider how you would fit in.

Once you have an idea of the need the employer is looking to fill, think about the experience you have, whether it is formal or informal. Consider how your experience meets the employer’s need. The cover letter provides you the chance to sell yourself to the employer by showing that what you can offer meets the need that they have.

While you may not have had a paid job before it does not mean that you don’t have the skills and experience that would make you a good employee for the job. For example, you may have gained customer service experience from volunteering at the food bank and distributing food to those in need.

Now that you have a good idea of what the employer has a need for along with how you can meet that need, you have the information necessary to write an effective cover letter.

Keep proper format in mind when writing your cover letter. For more information on format, click here .

You should start your cover letter with a header that includes the contact information for yourself and the employer. Then, you can follow with “Dear Hiring Manager (if you don’t know the name of the contact person. If you do know the name of the person to direct the cover letter to, you will want to use their name).

Next, introduce yourself, state what job you are applying for and how you heard about it. For example:

Per you advertisement on Craigslist for a Customer Service Specialist, I am attaching my resume for your review. I take pride in the customer service skills I have developed from volunteer opportunities over the last few years and welcome the opportunity to work directly with people.

Did you hear about the job from someone that the employer may know? You will want to mention that in your cover letter. A personal referral will often get your resume looked at.

The next paragraph or two will be where you will make the case that you can meet the needs of the employer. Think of the skills and experience that you have and how they relate to the job you are applying for.  This is where you will let the employer know why you are the right fit for the job and would make a great employee.

In the cover letter you can offer information that may not be on your resume.  Did you provide customer service while participating in the annual car wash that is held as a fundraiser for your basketball team? You can include that in your cover letter.  For example:

As a member of our school’s basketball team, I have participated in our annual car wash fundraiser over the last three years. My experience includes interacting with car wash customers, collecting their donations, ensuring their satisfaction and resolving any issues that arise. The car wash is typically very busy and requires that I work well in a fast-paced environment, as well as handle customer complaints efficiently and with confidence.

I also have been volunteering with the ABC Food Bank, assisting with distributing food boxes to recipients. While I spend some time making the food boxes, the majority of this experience involves working with recipients and ensuring that they have a positive experience with the food bank.

Your final paragraph is your closing paragraph, where you will briefly restate what you have written and why you should be considered for the open position. You will then sign the cover letter. For example:

My experiences working with the basketball team fundraiser and the ABC Food Bank have helped me to develop my customer service and problem solving skills. Both roles involve working in a fast paced environment, similar to what you describe in your advertisement. I welcome the opportunity to meet with you in person to further discuss my qualifications.

Please contact me with any questions.

Jennifer Job

For additional information regarding what to include in your cover letter, click here .

Important Things to Look for When Proofreading your Cover Letter

It is important that you proofread your cover letter once it is written. The cover letter is the first impression a potential employer will have of you and you want to be sure that the first impression is a good one.

When proofreading your cover letter, here are some things to look out for:

  • Spelling or grammar errors
  • Confirm that you have followed the proper format
  • Ensure that your verb tenses are correct. If you are still doing something at the time you are writing the cover letter, use the present tense. If you are no longer doing the activity, use past tense.
  • Confirm that you demonstrate in your cover letter that you understand what the employer is looking for as well as how you and your experience can meet their need.
  • Make sure that the cover letter is job-specific.
  • Employers are often put off by generic cover letters that are used for every application you submit.

For more on proofreading your cover letter, click here .

Where to Find Cover Letter Examples for Students

Most things are easier to do when you have examples to review to provide guidance. As you work on creating your cover letter, it is okay to refer to cover letter that you find online or from a friend or relative.

Click here for an example of a student cover letter. For another example, click here .

A template may be helpful as well and we have included one below:

Your Address

Your Phone Number

Your email address

Name of Contact Person

Title of Contact Person (if you have)

Business Name

Business Address

Dear Mr. A or Ms. A (if you don’t know the name of the person hiring you can say “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To whom it May Concern,”

Paragraph 1: state the job you are applying for and where you heard about it. Note in this paragraph if anyone in particular referred you for the job. Provide a quick overview of your experience. We can use some of what we wrote above:

Paragraph 2-3:

As a member of our school’s business club, I have volunteered to work at our school store for the last two years. My experience includes serving teachers and students, ensuring their satisfaction and resolving any issues that arise. As the store has limited hours, the environment is fast-paced and I have learned to handle customer complaints efficiently and with confidence.

I also have been volunteering with the Human Society, assisting with pet adoptions. While I spend some time with the animals, the majority of this experience involves working with customers and ensuring that they have a positive experience with the agency.

Closing Paragraph:

My experience working with the school store and the Humane Society have helped me to develop my customer service and problem solving skills. Both roles involved working in a fast paced environment, similar to what you describe in your advertisement. I welcome the opportunity to meet with you in person to further discuss my qualifications.

I look forward to speaking with you. Please contact me with any questions.

You will then sign your cover letter with your full name.

For more examples of cover letters for students with no work experience, click here and here .

For more information on jobs for teenagers, click here .

Make sure that you submit both your cover letter and resume on best day/time to apply for the job.   This will increase your chances of getting the job and standing out from other applicants.  The cover letter is an opportunity to set yourself apart from other applicants. Even without formal work experience, you can put together a cover letter that will help you to stand out.

So, what do you think about cover letter examples for students? Do you agree with what was said above?  Comment below to let us know!

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How to Write a Cover Letter for Students

Smiling Asian teen girl sits on floor with laptop writing cover letter

You’ve found a dream job posting and worked hard to create a polished resume. But before you submit your application, you need to write a cover letter. It’s an essential written document that accompanies your resume and showcases how your skills and work experience match up with the key requirements listed in the job description.

Of course, writing the thing is easier said than done, especially when it comes to creating a cover letter for students. Luckily, we’ve talked to the pros and got the 411 on cover letters. This article will cover how to address a cover letter to striking the right professional cover letter format to how to write a cover letter with no experience. Dive in and learn how you make the best first impression to a prospective employer.

What is a cover letter?

A cover letter is a one-page written introduction to a prospective employer, which is submitted with your job application. Consider it the sidekick to your resume : it briefly explains why you’re applying for the position and gives you a chance to sell your skills.

“It sends out a call for action for them to call you for an interview,” says Christine VandeGraaf, General Manager of Employment, Training and Settlement Services at the YMCA of Hamilton. 

These days, debates rage about whether the cover letter is dead , and the jury is still out on the verdict. While it’s true that some employers are phasing it out, a cover letter can nonetheless give you a leg up in the job application process. 

“The potential employer is seeing dozens of other resumes along with yours,” says Cheyene Shuart and Abby Russell from the YMCA of Southwestern Ontario. “So your cover letter is your chance to start a conversation with the employer and show them who you really are and why you would be a good fit for the position.”

Do you need a cover letter as a teenager?

The unanimous answer from the experts is… yes! Teenagers should always include a cover letter with their resume, even if a job posting doesn’t explicitly state that one is required. Consider it a best practice that can help you stand out above the rest, and if yo u have limited work experience, the experts say it can especially give you a competitive edge. 

“It can be intimidating to find work when you haven’t had much (or any) work experience, especially when most positions are looking for previous experience,” says Shuart. “Sometimes resumes aren’t enough to prove to the employer that you would be a good fit for the position,” adds Russell. 

“Cover letters are meant to highlight a little bit of your experience and skills, but they are mostly used to explain how that experience and skills relate to this exact position, which is what matters the most to potential employers.” 

Read more: 14 best part-time jobs for teens . 

teen boy looks thoughtfully at laptop writing cover letter for job

What should a high school cover letter include?

Whatever you do, don’t draft a saga of all the things you’ve ever done in your life and why it makes you great. When it comes to writing a cover letter, brevity is your BFF: Recruiters generally spend six seconds reviewing the average candidate . Make every word count! Here’s what should make the cut in your cover letter, including how to address a cover letter.

Your contact information

Your contact information should appear first. Typically, this section sits in the left-hand corner at the top of the page and includes your name, address, email address, website, LinkedIn URL, and phone number in a listicle format.

By the way, now is the time to create a professional email address. Keep it simple: use your name ([email protected]) or create a generic address ([email protected]). 

Hit the enter button twice and write the date in full [DAY/MONTH/YEAR].

The employer’s contact information

Next, include all the employer’s contact information two lines after the date. List the hiring manager/employer’s name, company name, company address, and any other contact information pulled from the job posting.

Start with a polite greeting, such as “Dear [Ms./Mr./Dr./Professor/etc.] [LAST NAME].” If you aren’t sure of the hiring manager’s gender or wish to avoid gendered greetings altogether, you can enter their full name (“Dear FIRST NAME/LAST NAME”).

Avoid using “To whom it may concern” if you can, as some experts say this greeting is starting to feel a little tired .

First paragraph: Introduce yourself 

Right off the bat, the first paragraph should cover the basics: who you are, what position you’re applying for, how you heard about the position, why it interests you, and what makes you an ideal candidate.

 “This should be no more than three or four sentences and should just be a quick snapshot to capture the reader’s attention,” says Shuart and Russell.

Second paragraph: Your qualifications 

The next paragraph should describe your credentials as it relates to the job description. Specifically, describe how your relevant education, work/volunteer, and skills or training experience make you a good fit for the job. But keep it short: Focus on how your accomplishments match the job requirements and leave the nitty-gritty details for your resume. This section should be no more than five to seven sentences. 

“When writing sentences about your skills and how they apply to the job, always explain when you used the skill, how you used it, and what the end result was,” says Shuart and Russell. “This shows the employer that you did your homework on what they are looking for and helps to illustrate why you would be a good fit.”

For example, if the job posting is asking for “excellent communication skills,” you could talk about your experience as a student council representative: “As student council secretary, I am responsible for producing an online newsletter that is distributed monthly to over 700 students—an experience that has given me the opportunity to build and apply my excellent communication skills.” 

Depending on the job, you may also want to highlight other strengths or “selling features” that could help get you onto the interview list.

“For a young person, it may include phrases such as availability (evenings/days/weekends) driver’s license and access to a car, WHMIS certifications, or how the experience will fit into their future career goals,” says VandeGraaf. 

The bottom line: Explain how your qualifications directly relate to the position and use concrete examples.

Closing paragraph: Wrap up and thank you 

In your final paragraph (around three to five sentences), wrap up with a brief conclusion about why the skills you highlighted make you a good fit for the job. Shuart and Russell also say to “be bold” and include a call to action—such as requesting a job interview —as well as restate how you can be contacted (“I can be reached by mobile phone or email”). Last but not least, don’t forget to thank the employer for their time and consideration. 

“They have lots of resumes to get through, so a little appreciation can help them remember you better!” they add.

End on a professional note: “Finish strong with a polite, formal closing, such as “Sincerely, [YOUR FULL NAME]”.

Learn more: Job interview questions for teens and sample answers .

Tips for writing a cover letter for a student with no work experience 

No work experience under your belt? You’ve got this! Here are a few tips for how to write a cover letter with no experience. 

Read the job posting

“The job posting tells you what skills and experience the employer is looking for, so you should show the employer how you measure up to their needs,” says Shuart and Russell. It also gives away keywords to use in your cover letter and resume.  

Prove your skills

Make a list of the key skills required for the position (e.g., excellent communication, time management, problem-solving abilities). Then, think of examples of when you accomplished something using those desired skills. “Whether it was work, volunteer, or academic experience, the most important part is proving you have the skill,” says Shuart and Russell. “You also can relate it to the position: ‘My communication skills would help me build a strong rapport with customers.’” If you’re struggling to make the connection, ask a friend or family member to help you brainstorm. 

Group of three teens wearing green t-shirts that says "volunteer"

Think outside the box

If you’ve never had a job, draw on your lived experience to illustrate putting your skills into practice. Were you a volunteer tennis coach for kids last summer? Did you organize a climate justice rally that 500 people attended? Did you teach your grandma how to use Microsoft Office on a weekend? “Any experience is good experience!” says Shuart and Russell. “You don’t have to have previous work experience to have good communication. Can you use a volunteering or academic example?”

Use keywords

If the job is asking for “excellent customer service skills,” include that phrase somewhere in your cover letter. “Some employers use software that searches for the keywords they are looking for, so your cover letter could be screened out if you don’t have the keywords noted in the job posting,” says Shuart and Russell. “The other benefit of using these keywords is showing the employer you read carefully through their job posting. It’s a great, subtle way to show you pay attention to details as well!”

Use “action” words to paint a picture

Use descriptive language to showcase your skills and experience, as well as your accomplishments. Instead of simply saying you did something, use “action” verbs such as led, researched, created, managed, delivered, resolved, founded, developed, tracked, collaborated, grew, or promoted. Put your thesaurus to work! 

Keep it simple

A cover letter should be easy-to-read and not cluttered with text. Keep it simple and don’t bedazzle it with fancy colours and graphics. “Most employers prefer to see simple, easy-to-follow applications,” say Shuart and Russell. “Keep most of your text left-aligned and keep it professional-looking.”

Run a spelling and grammar check. Read your cover letter out loud to catch any long-winded sentences or awkward transitions. Get a parent or friend to proofread for typos. Double-check that the hiring manager’s name is spelled correctly. Your cover letter should be as clean as a whistle before you hit send.

Learn more: Best summer jobs for teens in Canada .

Sample cover letter or high school student

Need inspo to write a killer cover letter? Here’s a sample cover letter for high school students.

Teen girl holding pile of books and working at library

Jennifer McGee

1000 Fairyland Blvd

Toronto, Ontario

(416) 111-4444

[email protected]

January 1, 2023

Theresa Wright

Head Librarian

Toronto Public Library – Palmerston Branch

560 Palmerston Ave

Toronto, ON M6G 2P7 

Dear Ms. Wright,

Please accept my application for the position of Library Page at the Toronto Public Library, Palmerston Branch. As an avid reader and regular library patron, I was very excited to learn about the available position, which is currently posted on your organization’s website. My professionalism, work ethic, and understanding and appreciation for public service make me an ideal candidate for this position. 

As student council secretary, I am responsible for producing an online newsletter that is distributed bi-weekly to over 700 students—an experience that has given me the opportunity to apply my excellent communication skills in action. Most recently, I completed a twelve-week co-op experience at FoodShare Toronto, where I worked in the community garden and supported food literacy workshops in schools. The experience gave me an opportunity to interact with the public in a professional manner, as well as complete tasks independently and part of a team. My values for hard work and continuous learning allowed me to complete the co-op with a grade of 95%. My time management skills were also demonstrated when I had to juggle three essays and two exams during last semester. I used my superior organizational skills to ensure that I prioritize my school work based on difficulty level and deadline, while balancing my hobbies of tennis and piano. As a result of my efforts, I achieved Honour Roll status and a good work-life balance. 

The Toronto Public Library values teamwork and public service, both of which align with my skills, experience, and values. I also get enormous satisfaction in serving the public and have a passion for promoting literacy. Based on my qualifications, I believe I would be a strong member of the team at the Palmerston Branch. I would love to discuss my candidacy further in an interview with you. I can be reached by phone or email. Thank you so much for your time and for considering my application. 

Sincerely, 

Last word about how to write a cover letter like a pro 

The task of writing a cover letter can feel daunting when you’re facing a blank screen. But there’s only one way to overcome that hurdle: start writing! Using these expert tips, kick off your letter by formally introducing yourself and then outlining how your skills and experience make you suited to the job. Use concrete examples that are action- and results-oriented, showing (not just telling!) how you’re a great candidate. 

If you’ve never had a job, remember that your lived experience is equally valuable, and no employer expects you to have a plethora of job experience at this stage in your life. Avoid padding your cover letter with overblown achievements, and focus on sharing what you have to offer. 

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This article offers general information only and is not intended as legal, financial or other professional advice. A professional advisor should be consulted regarding your specific situation. While the information presented is believed to be factual and current, its accuracy is not guaranteed and it should not be regarded as a complete analysis of the subjects discussed. All expressions of opinion reflect the judgment of the author(s) as of the date of publication and are subject to change. No endorsement of any third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products or services is expressly given or implied by Royal Bank of Canada or its affiliates.

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How to write a great cover letter in 2024: tips and structure

young-woman-checking-her-cover-lette

A cover letter is a personalized letter that introduces you to a potential employer, highlights your qualifications, and explains why you're a strong fit for a specific job.

Hate or love them, these brief documents allow job seekers to make an impression and stand out from the pile of other applications. Penning a thoughtful cover letter shows the hiring team you care about earning the position.

Here’s everything you need to know about how to write a cover letter — and a great one, at that.

What is a cover letter and why does it matter?

A professional cover letter is a one-page document you submit alongside your CV or resume as part of a job application. Typically, they’re about half a page or around 150–300 words.

An effective cover letter doesn’t just rehash your CV; it’s your chance to highlight your proudest moments, explain why you want the job, and state plainly what you bring to the table.

Show the reviewer you’re likable, talented, and will add to the company’s culture . You can refer to previous jobs and other information from your CV, but only if it helps tell a story about you and your career choices .

What 3 things should you include in a cover letter?

A well-crafted cover letter can help you stand out to potential employers. To make your cover letter shine, here are three key elements to include:

1. Personalization

Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name whenever possible. If the job posting doesn't include a name, research to find out who will be reviewing applications. Personalizing your cover letter shows that you've taken the time to tailor your application to the specific company and role.

2. Highlight relevant achievements and skills

Emphasize your most relevant skills , experiences, and accomplishments that directly relate to the job you're applying for. Provide specific examples of how your skills have benefited previous employers and how they can contribute to the prospective employer's success. Use quantifiable achievements , such as improved efficiency, cost savings, or project success, to demonstrate your impact.

3. Show enthusiasm and fit

Express your enthusiasm for the company and the position you're applying for. Explain why you are interested in this role and believe you are a good fit for the organization. Mention how your values, goals, and skills align with the company's mission and culture. Demonstrating that you've done your research can make a significant impression.

What do hiring managers look for in a cover letter?

Employers look for several key elements in a cover letter. These include:

Employers want to see that your cover letter is specifically tailored to the position you are applying for. It should demonstrate how your skills, experiences, and qualifications align with the job requirements.

Clear and concise writing

A well-written cover letter is concise, easy to read, and error-free. Employers appreciate clear and effective communication skills , so make sure your cover letter showcases your ability to express yourself effectively.

Demonstrated knowledge of the company

Employers want to see that you are genuinely interested in their organization. Mention specific details about the company, such as recent achievements or projects, to show that you are enthusiastic about joining their team.

Achievements and accomplishments

Highlight your relevant achievements and accomplishments that demonstrate your qualifications for the position. Use specific examples to showcase your skills and show how they can benefit the employer.

Enthusiasm and motivation

Employers want to hire candidates who are excited about the opportunity and motivated to contribute to the company's success. Express your enthusiasm and passion for the role and explain why you are interested in working for the company.

Professionalism

A cover letter should be professional in tone and presentation. Use formal language, address the hiring manager appropriately, and follow standard business letter formatting.

excited-woman-in-her-office-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

How do you structure a cover letter?

A well-structured cover letter follows a specific format that makes it easy for the reader to understand your qualifications and enthusiasm for the position. Here's a typical structure for a cover letter:

Contact information

Include your name, address, phone number, and email address at the top of the letter. Place your contact information at the beginning so that it's easy for the employer to reach you.

Employer's contact information

Opening paragraph, middle paragraph(s), closing paragraph, complimentary close, additional contact information.

Repeat your contact information (name, phone number, and email) at the end of the letter, just in case the employer needs it for quick reference.

Remember to keep your cover letter concise and focused. It should typically be no more than one page in length. Proofread your letter carefully to ensure it is free from spelling and grammatical errors. Tailor each cover letter to the specific job application to make it as relevant and impactful as possible.

How to write a good cover letter (with examples)

The best letters are unique, tailored to the job description, and written in your voice — but that doesn’t mean you can’t use a job cover letter template.

Great cover letters contain the same basic elements and flow a certain way. Take a look at this cover letter structure for ref erence while you construct your own.

1. Add a header and contact information

While reading your cover letter, the recruiter shouldn’t have to look far to find who wrote it. Your document should include a basic heading with the following information:

  • Pronouns (optional)
  • Location (optional)
  • Email address
  • Phone number (optional)
  • Relevant links, such as your LinkedIn profile , portfolio, or personal website (optional)

You can pull this information directly from your CV. Put it together, and it will look something like this:

Christopher Pike

San Francisco, California

[email protected]

Alternatively, if the posting asks you to submit your cover letter in the body of an email, you can include this information in your signature. For example:

Warm regards,

Catherine Janeway

Bloomington, Indiana

[email protected]

(555) 999 - 2222

man-using-his-laptop-while-smiling-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

2. Include a personal greeting

Always begin your cover letter by addressing the hiring manager — preferably by name. You can use the person’s first and last name. Make sure to include a relevant title, like Dr., Mr., or Ms. For example, “Dear Mr. John Doe.”

Avoid generic openings like “To whom it may concern,” “Dear sir or madam,” or “Dear hiring manager.” These introductions sound impersonal — like you’re copy-pasting cover letters — and can work against you in the hiring process.

Be careful, though. When using someone’s name, you don’t want to use the wrong title or accidentally misgender someone. If in doubt, using only their name is enough. You could also opt for a gender-neutral title, like Mx.

Make sure you’re addressing the right person in your letter — ideally, the person who’s making the final hiring decision. This isn’t always specified in the job posting, so you may have to do some research to learn the name of the hiring manager.

3. Draw them in with an opening story

The opening paragraph of your cover letter should hook the reader. You want it to be memorable, conversational, and extremely relevant to the job you’re pursuing. 

There’s no need for a personal introduction — you’ve already included your name in the heading. But you should make reference to the job you’re applying for. A simple “Thank you for considering my application for the role of [job title] at [company],” will suffice.

Then you can get into the “Why” of your job application. Drive home what makes this specific job and this company so appealing to you. Perhaps you’re a fan of their products, you’re passionate about their mission, or you love their brand voice. Whatever the case, this section is where you share your enthusiasm for the role.

Here’s an example opening paragraph. In this scenario, you’re applying for a digital marketing role at a bicycle company:

“Dear Mr. John Doe,

Thank you for considering my application for the role of Marketing Coordinator at Bits n’ Bikes.

My parents bought my first bike at one of your stores. I’ll never forget the freedom I felt when I learned to ride it. My father removed my training wheels, and my mom sent me barrelling down the street. You provide joy to families across the country — and I want to be part of that.”

4. Emphasize why you’re best for the job

Your next paragraphs should be focused on the role you’re applying to. Highlight your skill set and why you’re a good fit for the needs and expectations associated with the position. Hiring managers want to know what you’ll bring to the job, not just any role.

Start by studying the job description for hints. What problem are they trying to solve with this hire? What skills and qualifications do they mention first or more than once? These are indicators of what’s important to the hiring manager.

Search for details that match your experience and interests. For example, if you’re excited about a fast-paced job in public relations, you might look for these elements in a posting:

  • They want someone who can write social media posts and blog content on tight deadlines
  • They value collaboration and input from every team member
  • They need a planner who can come up with strong PR strategies

Highlight how you fulfill these requirements:

“I’ve always been a strong writer. From blog posts to social media, my content pulls in readers and drives traffic to product pages. For example, when I worked at Bits n’ Bikes, I developed a strategic blog series about bike maintenance that increased our sales of spare parts and tools by 50% — we could see it in our web metrics.

Thanks to the input of all of our team members, including our bike mechanics, my content delivered results.”

5. End with a strong closing paragraph and sign off gracefully

Your closing paragraph is your final chance to hammer home your enthusiasm about the role and your unique ability to fill it. Reiterate the main points you explained in the body paragraphs and remind the reader of what you bring to the table.

You can also use the end of your letter to relay other important details, like whether you’re willing to relocate for the job.

When choosing a sign-off, opt for a phrase that sounds professional and genuine. Reliable options include “Sincerely” and “Kind regards.”

Here’s a strong closing statement for you to consider:

“I believe my enthusiasm, skills, and work experience as a PR professional will serve Bits n’ Bikes very well. I would love to meet to further discuss my value-add as your next Director of Public Relations. Thank you for your consideration. I hope we speak soon.

man-reading-carefully-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

Tips to write a great cover letter that compliments your resume

When writing your own letter, try not to copy the example excerpts word-for-word. Instead, use this cover letter structure as a baseline to organize your ideas. Then, as you’re writing, use these extra cover letter tips to add your personal touch:

  • Keep your cover letter different from your resume : Your cover letter should not duplicate the information on your resume. Instead, it should provide context and explanations for key points in your resume, emphasizing how your qualifications match the specific job you're applying for.
  • Customize your cover letter . Tailor your cover letter for each job application. Address the specific needs of the company and the job posting, demonstrating that you've done your homework and understand their requirements.
  • Show enthusiasm and fit . Express your enthusiasm for the company and position in the cover letter. Explain why you are interested in working for this company and how your values, goals, and skills align with their mission and culture.
  • Use keywords . Incorporate keywords from the job description and industry terms in your cover letter. This can help your application pass through applicant tracking systems (ATS) and demonstrate that you're well-versed in the field.
  • Keep it concise . Your cover letter should be succinct and to the point, typically no more than one page. Focus on the most compelling qualifications and experiences that directly support your application.
  • Be professional . Maintain a professional tone and structure in your cover letter. Proofread it carefully to ensure there are no errors.
  • Address any gaps or concerns . If there are gaps or concerns in your resume, such as employment gaps or a change in career direction, briefly address them in your cover letter. Explain any relevant circumstances and how they have shaped your qualifications and determination.
  • Provide a call to action . Conclude your cover letter with a call to action, inviting the employer to contact you for further discussion. Mention that you've attached your resume for their reference.
  • Follow the correct format . Use a standard cover letter format like the one above, including your contact information, a formal salutation, introductory and closing paragraphs, and your signature. Ensure that it complements your resume without redundancy.
  • Pick the right voice and tone . Try to write like yourself, but adapt to the tone and voice of the company. Look at the job listing, company website, and social media posts. Do they sound fun and quirky, stoic and professional, or somewhere in-between? This guides your writing style.
  • Tell your story . You’re an individual with unique expertise, motivators, and years of experience. Tie the pieces together with a great story. Introduce how you arrived at this point in your career, where you hope to go , and how this prospective company fits in your journey. You can also explain any career changes in your resume.
  • Show, don’t tell . Anyone can say they’re a problem solver. Why should a recruiter take their word for it if they don’t back it up with examples? Instead of naming your skills, show them in action. Describe situations where you rose to the task, and quantify your success when you can.
  • Be honest . Avoid highlighting skills you don’t have. This will backfire if they ask you about them in an interview. Instead, shift focus to the ways in which you stand out.
  • Avoid clichés and bullet points . These are signs of lazy writing. Do your best to be original from the first paragraph to the final one. This highlights your individuality and demonstrates the care you put into the letter.
  • Proofread . Always spellcheck your cover letter. Look for typos, grammatical errors, and proper flow. We suggest reading it out loud. If it sounds natural rolling off the tongue, it will read naturally as well.

woman-writing-on-her-notebook-how-to-write-a-cover-letter

Common cover letter writing FAQs

How long should a cover letter be.

A cover letter should generally be concise and to the point. It is recommended to keep it to one page or less, focusing on the most relevant information that highlights your qualifications and fits the job requirements.

Should I include personal information in a cover letter?

While it's important to introduce yourself and provide your contact information, avoid including personal details such as your age, marital status, or unrelated hobbies. Instead, focus on presenting your professional qualifications and aligning them with the job requirements.

Can I use the same cover letter for multiple job applications?

While it may be tempting to reuse a cover letter, it is best to tailor each cover letter to the specific job you are applying for. This allows you to highlight why you are a good fit for that particular role and show genuine interest in the company.

Do I need to address my cover letter to a specific person?

Whenever possible, it is advisable to address your cover letter to a specific person, such as the hiring manager or recruiter. If the job posting does not provide this information, try to research and find the appropriate contact. If all else fails, you can use a generic salutation such as "Dear Hiring Manager."

Should I include references in my cover letter?

It is generally not necessary to include references in your cover letter. Save this information for when the employer explicitly requests it. Instead, focus on showcasing your qualifications and achievements that make you a strong candidate for the position.

It’s time to start writing your stand-out cover letter

The hardest part of writing is getting started. 

Hopefully, our tips gave you some jumping-off points and confidence . But if you’re really stuck, looking at cover letter examples and resume templates will help you decide where to get started. 

There are numerous sample cover letters available online. Just remember that you’re a unique, well-rounded person, and your cover letter should reflect that. Using our structure, you can tell your story while highlighting your passion for the role. 

Doing your research, including strong examples of your skills, and being courteous is how to write a strong cover letter. Take a breath , flex your fingers, and get typing. Before you know it, your job search will lead to a job interview.

If you want more personalized guidance, a specialized career coach can help review, edit, and guide you through creating a great cover letter that sticks.

Ace your job search

Explore effective job search techniques, interview strategies, and ways to overcome job-related challenges. Our coaches specialize in helping you land your dream job.

Elizabeth Perry, ACC

Elizabeth Perry is a Coach Community Manager at BetterUp. She uses strategic engagement strategies to cultivate a learning community across a global network of Coaches through in-person and virtual experiences, technology-enabled platforms, and strategic coaching industry partnerships. With over 3 years of coaching experience and a certification in transformative leadership and life coaching from Sofia University, Elizabeth leverages transpersonal psychology expertise to help coaches and clients gain awareness of their behavioral and thought patterns, discover their purpose and passions, and elevate their potential. She is a lifelong student of psychology, personal growth, and human potential as well as an ICF-certified ACC transpersonal life and leadership Coach.

3 cover letter examples to help you catch a hiring manager’s attention

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How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

Background Image

After weeks of heavy job searching, you’re almost there!

You’ve perfected your resume.

You’ve short-listed the coolest jobs you want to apply for.

You’ve even had a friend train you for every single interview question out there.

But then, before you can send in your application and call it a day, you remember that you need to write a cover letter too.

So now, you’re stuck staring at a blank page, wondering where to start...

Don’t panic! We’ve got you covered. Writing a cover letter is a lot simpler than you might think. 

In this guide, we’re going to teach you how to write a cover letter that gets you the job you deserve.

We're going to cover:

What Is a Cover Letter?

  • How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter, Step by Step
  • 15+ Job-Winning Cover Letter Examples

Let’s get started.

A cover letter is a document that you submit as part of your job application, alongside your resume or CV.

The purpose of a cover letter is to introduce you and briefly summarize your professional background. On average, it should be around 250 to 400 words long .

A good cover letter is supposed to impress the hiring manager and convince them you’re worth interviewing as a candidate.

So, how can your cover letter achieve this?

First of all, it should complement your resume, not copy it. Your cover letter is your chance to elaborate on important achievements, skills, or anything else that your resume doesn’t give you the space to cover. 

For example, if you have an employment gap on your resume, the cover letter is a great place to explain why it happened and how it helped you grow as a person. 

If this is your first time writing a cover letter, writing about yourself might seem complicated. But don’t worry—you don’t need to be super creative or even a good writer .

All you have to do is follow this tried and tested cover letter structure:

structure of a cover letter

  • Header. Add all the necessary contact information at the top of your cover letter.
  • Formal greeting. Choose an appropriate way to greet your target audience.
  • Introduction. Introduce yourself in the opening paragraph and explain your interest in the role.
  • Body. Elaborate on why you’re the best candidate for the job and a good match for the company. Focus on “selling” your skills, achievements, and relevant professional experiences.
  • Conclusion. Summarize your key points and wrap it up professionally.

Now, let’s take a look at an example of a cover letter that follows our structure perfectly:

How to Write a Cover Letter

New to cover letter writing? Give our cover letter video a watch before diving into the article!

When Should You Write a Cover Letter?

You should always include a cover letter in your job application, even if the hiring manager never reads it. Submitting a cover letter is as important as submitting a resume if you want to look like a serious candidate.

If the employer requests a cover letter as part of the screening process, not sending one is a huge red flag and will probably get your application tossed into the “no” pile immediately.

On the other hand, if the job advertisement doesn’t require a cover letter from the candidates, adding one shows you went the extra mile.

Putting in the effort to write a cover letter can set you apart from other candidates with similar professional experience and skills, and it could even sway the hiring manager to call you for an interview if you do it right.

Need to write a letter to help get you into a good school or volunteer program? Check out our guide to learn how to write a motivation letter !

How to Write the Perfect Cover Letter

Now that you know what a cover letter is, it’s time to learn how to write one!

We’ll go through the process in detail, step by step.

#1. Choose the Right Cover Letter Template

A good cover letter is all about leaving the right first impression.

So, what’s a better way to leave a good impression than a well-formatted, stylish template?

cover letter templates for 2024

Just choose one of our hand-picked cover letter templates , and you’ll be all set in no time!

As a bonus, our intuitive AI will even give you suggestions on how to improve your cover letter as you write it. You’ll have the perfect cover letter done in minutes!

cover letter templates

#2. Put Contact Information in the Header

As with a resume, it’s important to 

start your cover letter

 with your contact details at the top. These should be in your cover letter’s header, separated neatly from the bulk of your text.

Contact Information on Cover Letter

Here, you want to include all the essential contact information , including:

  • Full Name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top.
  • Job Title. Match the professional title underneath your name to the exact job title of the position you’re applying for. Hiring managers often hire for several roles at once, so giving them this cue about what role you’re after helps things go smoother.
  • Email Address. Always use a professional and easy-to-spell email address. Ideally, it should combine your first and last names.
  • Phone Number. Add a number where the hiring manager can easily reach you.
  • Location. Add your city and state/country, no need for more details.
  • Relevant Links (optional). You can add links to websites or social media profiles that are relevant to your field. Examples include a LinkedIn profile , Github, or an online portfolio.

Then it’s time to add the recipient’s contact details, such as:

  • Hiring Manager's Name. If you can find the name of the hiring manager, add it.
  • Hiring Manager's Title. While there’s no harm in writing “hiring manager,” if they’re the head of the department, we recommend you use that title accordingly.
  • Company Name. Make sure to write the name of the company you're applying to.
  • Location. The city and state/country are usually enough information here, too.
  • Date of Writing (Optional). You can include the date you wrote your cover letter for an extra professional touch.

matching resume and cover letter

#3. Address the Hiring Manager

Once you’ve properly listed all the contact information, it’s time to start writing the content of the cover letter.

The first thing you need to do here is to address your cover letter directly to the hiring manager.

In fact, you want to address the hiring manager personally .

Forget the old “Dear Sir or Madam” or the impersonal “To Whom It May Concern.” You want to give your future boss a good impression and show them that you did your research before sending in your application.

No one wants to hire a job seeker who just spams 20+ companies and hopes something sticks with their generic approach

So, how do you find out who’s the hiring manager?

First, check the job ad. The hiring manager’s name might be listed somewhere in it.

If that doesn’t work, check the company’s LinkedIn page. You just need to look up the head of the relevant department you’re applying to, and you’re all set.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of Communication Specialist at Novorésumé. The hiring manager is probably the Head of Communications or the Chief Communications Officer.

Here’s what you should look for on LinkedIn:

linkedin search cco

And there you go! You have your hiring manager.

But let’s say you’re applying for a position as a server . In that case, you’d be looking for the “restaurant manager” or “food and beverage manager.”

If the results don’t come up with anything, try checking out the “Team” page on the company website; there’s a good chance you’ll at least find the right person there.

Make sure to address them as Mr. or Ms., followed by their last name. If you’re not sure about their gender or marital status, you can just stick to their full name, like so:

  • Dear Mr. Kurtuy,
  • Dear Andrei Kurtuy,

But what if you still can’t find the hiring manager’s name, no matter where you look?

No worries. You can direct your cover letter to the company, department, or team as a whole, or just skip the hiring manager’s name.

  • Dear [Department] Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Department] Team
  • Dear [Company Name]

Are you applying for a research position? Learn how to write an academic personal statement .

#4. Write an Eye-Catching Introduction

First impressions matter, especially when it comes to your job search.

Hiring managers get hundreds, sometimes even thousands, of applications. Chances are, they’re not going to be reading every single cover letter end-to-end.

So, it’s essential to catch their attention from the very first paragraph.

The biggest problem with most opening paragraphs is that they’re usually extremely generic. Here’s an example:

  • My name is Jonathan, and I’d like to work as a Sales Manager at XYZ Inc. I’ve worked as a Sales Manager at MadeUpCompany Inc. for 5+ years, so I believe that I’d be a good fit for the position.

See the issue here? This opening paragraph doesn’t say anything except the fact that you’ve worked the job before.

And do you know who else has similar work experience? All the other applicants you’re competing with.

Instead, you want to start with some of your top achievements to grab the reader’s attention. And to get the point across, the achievements should be as relevant as possible to the position.

Your opening paragraph should also show the hiring manager a bit about why you want this specific job. For example, mention how the job relates to your plans for the future or how it can help you grow professionally. This will show the hiring manager that you’re not just applying left and right—you’re actually enthusiastic about getting this particular role.

Now, let’s make our previous example shine:

Dear Mr. Smith,

My name’s Michael, and I’d like to help XYZ Inc. hit and exceed its sales goals as a Sales Manager. I’ve worked as a Sales Representative with Company X, another fin-tech company , for 3+ years, where I generated an average of $30,000+ in sales per month and beat the KPIs by around 40%. I believe that my previous industry experience, passion for finance , and excellence in sales make me the right candidate for the job.

The second candidate starts with what they can do for the company in the future and immediately lists an impressive and relevant achievement. Since they’re experienced in the same industry and interested in finance, the hiring manager can see they’re not just a random applicant.

From this introduction, it’s safe to say that the hiring manager would read the rest of this candidate’s cover letter.

#5. Use the Cover Letter Body for Details

The next part of your cover letter is where you can go into detail about what sets you apart as a qualified candidate for the job.

The main thing you need to remember here is that you shouldn’t make it all about yourself . Your cover letter is supposed to show the hiring manager how you relate to the job and the company you’re applying to.

No matter how cool you make yourself sound in your cover letter, if you don’t tailor it to match what the hiring manager is looking for, you’re not getting an interview.

To get this right, use the job ad as a reference when writing your cover letter. Make sure to highlight skills and achievements that match the job requirements, and you’re good to go.

Since this part of your cover letter is by far the longest, you should split it into at least two paragraphs.

Here’s what each paragraph should cover:

Explain Why You’re the Perfect Candidate for the Role

Before you can show the hiring manager that you’re exactly what they’ve been looking for, you need to know what it is they’re looking for.

Start by doing a bit of research. Learn what the most important skills and responsibilities of the role are according to the job ad, and focus on any relevant experience you have that matches them.

For example, if you’re applying for the position of a Facebook Advertiser. The top requirements on the job ad are:

  • Experience managing a Facebook ad budget of $10,000+ / month
  • Some skills in advertising on other platforms (Google Search + Twitter)
  • Excellent copywriting skills

So, in the body of your cover letter, you need to show how you meet these requirements. Here’s an example of what that can look like:

In my previous role as a Facebook Marketing Expert at XYZ Inc. I handled customer acquisition through ads, managing a monthly Facebook ad budget of $40,000+ . As the sole digital marketer at the company, I managed the ad creation and management process end-to-end. I created the ad copy and images, picked the targeting, ran optimization trials, and so on.

Other than Facebook advertising, I’ve also delved into other online PPC channels, including:

  • Google Search

Our example addresses all the necessary requirements and shows off the candidate’s relevant skills.

Are you a student applying for your first internship? Learn how to write an internship cover letter with our dedicated guide.

Explain Why You’re a Good Fit for the Company

As skilled and experienced as you may be, that’s not all the hiring manager is looking for.

They also want someone who’s a good fit for their company and who actually wants to work there.

Employees who don’t fit in with the company culture are likely to quit sooner or later. This ends up costing the company a ton of money, up to 50% of the employee’s annual salary , so hiring managers vet candidates very carefully to avoid this scenario.

So, you have to convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about working with them.

Start by doing some research about the company. You want to know things like:

  • What’s the company’s business model?
  • What’s the company’s product or service? Have you used it?
  • What’s the company’s culture like?

Chances are, you’ll find all the information you need either on the company website or on job-search websites like Jobscan or Glassdoor.

Then, pick your favorite thing about the company and talk about it in your cover letter.

But don’t just describe the company in its own words just to flatter them. Be super specific—the hiring manager can see through any fluff.

For example, if you’re passionate about their product and you like the company’s culture of innovation and independent work model, you can write something like:

I’ve personally used the XYZ Smartphone, and I believe that it’s the most innovative tech I’ve used in years. The features, such as Made-Up-Feature #1 and Made-Up-Feature #2, were real game changers for the device.

I really admire how Company XYZ strives for excellence in all its product lines, creating market-leading tech. As someone who thrives in a self-driven environment, I truly believe that I’ll be a great match for your Product Design team.

So, make sure to do your fair share of research and come up with good reasons why you're applying to that specific company.

Is the company you want to work for not hiring at the moment? Check out our guide to writing a letter of interest .

#6. Wrap It Up and Sign It

Finally, it’s time to conclude your cover letter.

In the final paragraph, you want to:

  • Wrap up any points you couldn't make in the previous paragraphs. Do you have anything left to say? If there’s any other information that could help the hiring manager make their decision, mention it here. If not, just recap your key selling points so far, such as key skills and expertise.
  • Express gratitude. Politely thanking the hiring manager for their time is always a good idea.
  • Finish the cover letter with a call to action. The very last sentence in your cover letter should be a call to action. This means you should ask the hiring manager to do something, like call you and discuss your application or arrange an interview.
  • Remember to sign your cover letter. Just add a formal closing line and sign your name at the bottom.

Here’s an example of how to end your cover letter :

I hope to help Company X make the most of their Facebook marketing initiatives. I'd love to further discuss how my previous success at XYZ Inc. can help you achieve your Facebook marketing goals. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me at the provided email address or phone number so that we may arrange an interview.

Thank you for your consideration,

Alice Richards

Feel free to use one of these other popular closing lines for your cover letter:

  • Best Regards,
  • Kind Regards,

Cover Letter Writing Checklist

Once you’re done with your cover letter, it’s time to check if it meets all industry requirements. 

Give our handy cover letter writing checklist a look to make sure:

Does your cover letter heading include all essential information?

  • Professional Email
  • Phone Number
  • Relevant Links

Do you address the right person? 

  • The hiring manager in the company
  • Your future direct supervisor
  • The company/department in general

Does your introductory paragraph grab the reader's attention?

  • Did you mention some of your top achievements?
  • Did you use numbers and facts to back up your experience?
  • Did you convey enthusiasm for the specific role?

Do you show that you’re the right candidate for the job?

  • Did you identify the core requirements for the role?
  • Did you show how your experiences helped you fit the requirements perfectly?

Do you convince the hiring manager that you’re passionate about the company you’re applying to?

  • Did you identify the top 3 things that you like about the company?
  • Did you avoid generic reasons for explaining your interest in the company?

Did you conclude your cover letter properly?

  • Did you recap your key selling points in the conclusion?
  • Did you end your cover letter with a call to action?
  • Did you use the right formal closing line and sign your name?

15 Cover Letter Tips

Now you’re all set to write your cover letter! 

Before you start typing, here are some cover letter tips to help take your cover letter to the next level:

  • Customize Your Cover Letter for Each Job. Make sure your cover letter is tailored to the job you're applying for. This shows you're not just sending generic applications left and right, and it tells the hiring manager you’re the right person for the job.
  • Showcase Your Skills. Talk about how your skills meet the company’s needs. And while your hard skills should be front and center, you shouldn’t underestimate your soft skills in your cover letter either.
  • Avoid Fluff. Don’t make any generic statements you can’t back up. The hiring manager can tell when you’re just throwing words around, and it doesn’t make your cover letter look good.
  • Use Specific Examples. Instead of saying you're great at something, give an actual example to back up your claim. Any data you can provide makes you sound more credible, so quantify your achievements. For example, give numbers such as percentages related to your performance and the timeframe it took to accomplish certain achievements.
  • Research the Company. Always take time to learn about the company you're applying to. Make sure to mention something about them in your cover letter to show the hiring manager that you're interested.
  • Follow the Application Instructions. If the job posting asks for something specific in your cover letter or requires a certain format, make sure you include it. Not following instructions can come off as unattentive or signal to the hiring manager that you’re not taking the job seriously.
  • Use the Right Template and Format. Choose the right cover letter format and adapt your cover letter’s look to the industry you’re applying for. For example, if you’re aiming for a job in Law or Finance, you should go for a cleaner, more professional look. But if you’re applying for a field that values innovation, like IT or Design, you have more room for creativity.
  • Express Your Enthusiasm. Let the hiring manager know why you're excited about the job. Your passion for the specific role or the field in general can be a big selling point, and show them that you’re genuinely interested, not just applying left and right.
  • Address Any Gaps. If there are any employment gaps in your resume , your cover letter is a great place to mention why. Your resume doesn’t give you enough space to elaborate on an employment gap, so addressing it here can set hiring managers at ease—life happens, and employers understand.
  • Avoid Quirky Emails. Your email address should be presentable. It’s hard for a hiring manager to take you seriously if your email address is “[email protected].” Just use a [email protected] format.
  • Check Your Contact Information. Typos in your email address or phone number can mean a missed opportunity. Double-check these before sending your application.
  • Mention if You Want to Relocate. If you’re looking for a job that lets you move somewhere else, specify this in your cover letter.
  • Keep It Brief. You want to keep your cover letter short and sweet. Hiring managers don’t have time to read a novel, so if you go over one page, they simply won’t read it at all.
  • Use a Professional Tone. Even though a conversational tone isn’t a bad thing, remember that it's still a formal document. Show professionalism in your cover letter by keeping slang, jargon, and emojis out of it.
  • Proofread Carefully. Typos and grammar mistakes are a huge deal-breaker. Use a tool like Grammarly or QuillBot to double-check your spelling and grammar, or even get a friend to check it for you.

15+ Cover Letter Examples

Need some inspiration? Check out some perfect cover letter examples for different experience levels and various professions.

5+ Cover Letter Examples by Experience

#1. college student cover letter example.

college or student cover letter example

Check out our full guide to writing a college student cover letter here.

#2. Middle Management Cover Letter Example

Middle Management Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a project manager cover letter here.

#3. Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Team Leader Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a team leader cover letter here.

#4. Career Change Cover Letter Example

Career Change Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to a career change resume and cover letter here.

#5. Management Cover Letter Example

Management Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a management cover letter here.

#6. Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Senior Executive Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an executive resume here.

9+ Cover Letter Examples by Profession

#1. it cover letter example.

IT Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an IT cover letter here.

#2. Consultant Cover Letter Example

Consultant Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a consultant cover letter here.

#3. Human Resources Cover Letter

Human Resources Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a human resources cover letter here.

#4. Business Cover Letter Example

Business Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a business cover letter here.

#5. Sales Cover Letter Example

Sales Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a sales cover letter here.

#6. Social Worker Cover Letter

Social Worker Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a social worker cover letter here.

#7. Lawyer Cover Letter

Lawyer Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing a lawyer cover letter here.

#8. Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Administrative Assistant Cover Letter

Check out our full guide to writing an administrative assistant cover letter here.

#9. Engineering Cover Letter Example

Engineering Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing an engineer cover letter here.

#10. Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Receptionist Cover Letter Example

Check out our full guide to writing a receptionist cover letter here.

Need more inspiration? Check out these cover letter examples to learn what makes them stand out.

Plug & Play Cover Letter Template

Not sure how to start your cover letter? Don’t worry!

Just copy and paste our free cover letter template into the cover letter builder, and swap out the blanks for your details.

[Your Full Name]

[Your Profession]

[Your Phone Number]

[Your Email Address]

[Your Location]

[Your LinkedIn Profile URL (optional)]

[Your Personal Website URL (optional)]

[Recipient's Name, e.g., Jane Doe],

[Recipient's Position, e.g., Hiring Manager]

[Company Name, e.g., ABC Corporation]

[Company Address]

[City, State/Country]

Dear [Recipient's Name],

As a seasoned [Your Profession] with [Number of Years of Experience] years of industry experience, I am eager to express my interest in the [Job Title] position at [Company Name]. With my experience in [Your Industry/Sector] and the successes I've achieved throughout my education and career, I believe I can bring unique value and creativity to your team.

In my current role as [Your Current Job Title], I've taken the lead on more than [Number of Projects/Assignments] projects, some valued up to $[Highest Project Value]. I pride myself on consistently exceeding client expectations and have successfully [Mention a Key Achievement] in just a [Amount of Time] through [Skill] and [Skill].

I've collaborated with various professionals, such as [List Roles], ensuring that all [projects/tasks] meet [relevant standards or objectives]. This hands-on experience, coupled with my dedication to understanding each [client's/customer's] vision, has equipped me to navigate and deliver on complex projects.

My key strengths include:

  • Improving [Achievement] by [%] over [Amount of Time] which resulted in [Quantified Result].
  • Optimizing [Work Process/Responsibility] which saved [Previous Employer] [Amount of Time/Budget/Other Metric] over [Weeks/Months/Years]
  • Spearheading team of [Number of People] to [Task] and achieving [Quantified Result].

Alongside this letter, I've attached my resume. My educational background, a [Your Degree] with a concentration in [Your Specialization], complements the practical skills that I'm particularly eager to share with [Company Name].

I'm excited about the possibility of contributing to [Something Notable About the Company or Its Mission]. I'd be grateful for the chance to delve deeper into how my expertise aligns with your needs.

Thank you for considering my application, and I look forward to hearing from you soon.

The Heart of Your Job Search - Creating a Killer Resume

Your cover letter is only as good as your resume. If either one is weak, your entire application falls through.

After all, your cover letter is meant to complement your resume. Imagine going through all this effort to leave an amazing first impression in your cover letter, only for the hiring manager to never read it because your resume was mediocre.

But don’t worry; we’ve got you covered here, too.

Check out our dedicated guide on how to make a resume and learn everything you need to know to land your dream job!

Just pick one of our resume templates and start writing your own job-winning resume.

resume examples for cover letters

Key Takeaways

Now that we’ve walked you through all the steps of writing a cover letter, let’s summarize everything we’ve learned:

  • A cover letter is a 250 - 400 word document that’s meant to convince the hiring manager that you’re the best candidate for the job.
  • Your job application should always include a cover letter alongside your resume.
  • To grab the hiring manager’s attention, write a strong opening paragraph. Mention who you are, why you’re applying, and a standout achievement to pique their interest.
  • Your cover letter should focus on why you’re the perfect candidate for the job and why you’re passionate about working in this specific company.
  • Use the body of your cover letter to provide details on your skills, achievements, and qualifications, as well as make sure to convey your enthusiasm throughout your whole cover letter.
  • Recap your key selling points towards the end of your cover letter, and end it with a formal closing line and your full name signed underneath.

At Novorésumé, we’re committed to helping you get the job you deserve every step of the way! 

Follow our career blog for more valuable advice, or check out some of our top guides, such as:

  • How to Make a Resume in 2024 | Beginner's Guide
  • How to Write a CV (Curriculum Vitae) in 2024 [31+ Examples]
  • 35+ Job Interview Questions and Answers [Full List]

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Letter Templates & Example

10 Cover Letter Examples for 17 Year Olds: Tips and Samples

Letter sample 146

Hey there! Are you a 17-year-old looking for some cover letter examples to help you land your first job? Look no further! We’ve compiled a list of sample cover letters that you can use as a guide when crafting your own. Whether you’re applying for a retail position or an internship, we’ve got you covered. Plus, each cover letter example can be edited and tailored to fit your specific needs and showcase your unique skills and experiences. So don’t stress over writing the perfect cover letter – take inspiration from our examples and start crafting yours today!

The Best Structure for Cover Letter Examples for a 17-year-old

Are you a 17-year-old looking to apply for your first job? Crafting a cover letter may seem daunting, but it’s a crucial component of your job application. The cover letter serves as your introduction to the prospective employer and highlights your qualifications for the position. Here’s the best structure for a cover letter for a 17-year-old.

First and foremost, introduce yourself. State your name, age, and the position you are applying for. It’s important to be upfront and honest about your age. You can mention any relevant experience or skills you possess that make you a suitable candidate for the job.

Next, mention why you are interested in the position. Be specific about what caught your attention and why you think you’d be a good fit. This is your chance to show your enthusiasm and passion for the job.

In the body of the cover letter, highlight your qualifications and experience. If you’ve had previous work experience, talk about the skills you developed and how they relate to the position you are applying for. If you don’t have any work experience, focus on your academic or extracurricular achievements. Show that you are responsible and have a strong work ethic.

Finally, end the cover letter with a strong conclusion. Thank the employer for considering your application and express your enthusiasm to further discuss your qualifications in an interview. Make sure to include your contact information and invite the employer to contact you with any questions.

In summary, the best structure for a cover letter for a 17-year-old includes an introduction, a statement of interest, a highlight of qualifications and experience, and a strong conclusion. Keep it concise, but make sure to showcase your skills and enthusiasm for the job. Good luck with your job search!

Sample Cover Letters for a 17 Year Old

Cover letter for college scholarship.

Dear Scholarship Committee,

I am thrilled to apply for the college scholarship you offer to talented students. As a hardworking and ambitious 17-year-old, I have great faith that this scholarship will serve as a stepping stone for me to pursue higher education and achieve my academic goals.

My first paragraph will focus on introducing myself and highlighting my academic achievements. In the second paragraph, I will explain how this scholarship will benefit me, my family, and the community, as well as why I think I’m the best candidate for this amazing opportunity.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Cover Letter for Retail Sales Associate

Dear Hiring Manager,

I am excited about the opportunity to join your team as a Retail Sales Associate. With my natural people skills and customer service experience from volunteering and part-time jobs, I am confident that I am the perfect fit for your store.

In the first paragraph, I will introduce myself and my interest in the position. In the second paragraph, I will explain how my soft skills and customer service experience make me the ideal candidate for this job.

Thank you for considering my application.

Best regards,

Cover Letter for Internship Program

Dear Internship Coordinator,

I am writing to express my sincere interest in the Internship Program you offer. As a highly motivated and enthusiastic 17-year-old, I believe this program will allow me to gain valuable experience and achieve my career goals.

In the first paragraph, I will introduce myself and explain why I am interested in the program. In the second paragraph, I will showcase my academic and extracurricular achievements and explain how they will contribute to the success of the program.

Cover Letter for Volunteer Position

Dear Volunteer Coordinator,

I am thrilled to apply for the volunteer position you offer. As a compassionate and dedicated 17-year-old, I believe this position will provide me with a fulfilling experience and an opportunity to give back to the community.

In the first paragraph, I will introduce myself and express my interest in the position. In the second paragraph, I will explain how my personal traits, skills, and experiences make me a valuable addition to your team.

Thank you for your kind attention.

Cover Letter for Babysitting Job

Dear Parents,

I am excited to apply for the babysitting job you offer. As a responsible and caring 17-year-old, I have considerable experience in taking care of children and providing a safe and enjoyable environment for them.

In the first paragraph, I will introduce myself and express my enthusiasm for the job. In the second paragraph, I will describe my relevant skills and experience, including CPR training, handling emergencies, and engaging children with various activities.

Thank you for your consideration.

Yours truly,

Cover Letter for Youth Leadership Program

Dear Program Coordinator,

I am writing to apply for the Youth Leadership Program you offer. As a passionate and dedicated 17-year-old, I believe this program will help me develop my leadership skills and make a positive impact on my peers and community.

In the first paragraph, I will introduce myself and my motivation for participating in the program. In the second paragraph, I will showcase my leadership potential and experience, including organizing school events, leading clubs, and volunteering in community service.

Cover Letter for Part-time Job

I am excited about the opportunity to join your team as a Part-time Employee. As a fast learner and hard worker, I am confident that I can contribute to your business while gaining valuable skills and experiences.

In the first paragraph, I will introduce myself and express my interest in the position. In the second paragraph, I will explain how my previous part-time jobs, academic performance, and personal qualities make me a suitable candidate for the job.

Tips for Writing an Impressive Cover Letter as a 17-Year-Old

When you’re applying for a job at 17, your cover letter is your chance to showcase your skills, experience, and enthusiasm for the role. Here are some tips that will help you write an impressive cover letter:

Research the Company: Before you start writing, it’s essential to research the company you’re applying to. Check out their website, social media profiles, and other online resources to get a better understanding of their culture and values. This information will help you tailor your cover letter to the company’s needs and will show that you’re genuinely interested in the job.

Focus on Your Skills: Since you may not have an extensive work history at 17, it’s crucial to highlight your skills and achievements. Mention any extracurricular activities, volunteer work, or internships that demonstrate relevant skills like teamwork, leadership, or problem-solving. Don’t be afraid to get creative and showcase your talents in areas like writing, organization, or technology skills, for example.

Be Enthusiastic: Hiring managers love to see enthusiastic candidates who are eager to learn and grow. Express your excitement for the role in your cover letter and explain why it’s important to you. Also, don’t forget to include a sentence or two about why you’re interested in the company, which will show that you’ve done your research.

Use Professional Language: Even if you’re a 17-year-old applying for your first job, it’s essential to use professional language in your cover letter. Avoid slang or casual language, and proofread your letter for grammar and spelling errors. Remember, your cover letter is your first impression to a potential employer, so make it count.

Keep it Concise: Your cover letter should be no more than one page long. Stick to the essentials and make sure you’re making your case for why you’re the best candidate for the job. Hiring managers don’t have time to read long cover letters, so keep it concise and to the point.

End with a Call to Action: Finally, end your cover letter with a call to action. Let the employer know that you’re excited to hear back from them and that you’re available for an interview at their convenience. Be sure to include your contact information and thank them for considering your application.

Follow these tips, and you’ll be well on your way to writing an impressive cover letter that will help you land your first job!

FAQs: Cover Letter Examples for 17 Year Old What is a cover letter and why do I need one?

A cover letter is a document that you submit along with your resume when applying for a job. It summarizes your relevant skills and experience and provides an opportunity for you to explain why you are the best candidate for the position.

What should I include in my cover letter?

Your cover letter should include a brief introduction, a statement explaining why you are interested in the job, a summary of your relevant skills and experience, and a closing statement thanking the employer for their time and consideration.

How long should my cover letter be?

Your cover letter should be no more than one page long. It should be succinct and to the point, while still conveying all the necessary information.

Should I address my cover letter to a specific person?

If possible, you should address your cover letter to a specific person. This shows that you have taken the time to research the company and the position. If you don’t know the name of the person who will be reading your letter, you can use a general salutation like “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Can I use a cover letter template?

Yes, you can use a cover letter template as a starting point. However, it’s important to customize the template to fit your specific skills and experience. Do not simply copy and paste the template without making any changes.

What should I do if I don’t have any work experience?

If you don’t have any work experience, you can focus on your relevant skills and achievements. For example, if you’re applying for a retail job, you can highlight your customer service skills and any volunteer experience you may have. You can also mention any relevant coursework or extracurricular activities.

Should I attach my cover letter and resume as separate files or in one document?

You should attach your cover letter and resume as separate files, unless the job posting specifically requests that you submit them as one document. Make sure to save the files with descriptive names, like “JaneDoeCoverLetter” and “JaneDoeResume.”

Wrapping Up

Thanks for reading and learning about cover letter examples for 17 year old job seekers! Remember, finding work for the first time can be a bit overwhelming. However, with a well-written cover letter and a positive attitude, you can set yourself apart from the competition and land the job of your dreams! Good luck, and don’t forget to check back often for more helpful career advice!

10 Effective Cover Letter Examples for Retail Jobs You Must See 10 Effective Cover Letter Examples for Retail with No Experience 5 Cover Letter Examples for 15 Year Olds That Will Get You Hired Cover Letter Examples for 16 Year Olds - How to Stand Out and Get Hired Impress Employers with These Cover Letter Examples for 16 Year Olds UK Internship Letter Format for Students from Company: Tips and Examples

how to write a cover letter for a 14 year old

How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

I ’ve read thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of cover letters in my career. If you’re thinking that sounds like really boring reading, you’re right. What I can tell you from enduring that experience is that most cover letters are terrible — and not only that, but squandered opportunities. When a cover letter is done well, it can significantly increase your chances of getting an interview, but the vast majority fail that test.

So let’s talk about how to do cover letters right.

First, understand the point of a cover letter.

The whole idea of a cover letter is that it can help the employer see you as more than just your résumé. Managers generally aren’t hiring based solely on your work history; your experience is crucial, yes, but they’re also looking for someone who will be easy to work with, shows good judgment, communicates well, possesses strong critical thinking skills and a drive to get things done, complements their current team, and all the other things you yourself probably want from your co-workers. It’s tough to learn much about those things from job history alone, and that’s where your cover letter comes in.

Because of that …

Whatever you do, don’t just summarize your résumé.

The No. 1 mistake people make with cover letters is that they simply use them to summarize their résumé. This makes no sense — hiring managers don’t need a summary of your résumé! It’s on the very next page! They’re about to see it as soon as they scroll down. And if you think about it, your entire application is only a few pages (in most cases, a one- or two-page résumé and a one-page cover letter) — why would you squander one of those pages by repeating the content of the others? And yet, probably 95 percent of the cover letters I see don’t add anything new beyond the résumé itself (and that’s a conservative estimate).

Instead, your cover letter should go beyond your work history to talk about things that make you especially well-suited for the job. For example, if you’re applying for an assistant job that requires being highly organized and you neurotically track your household finances in a detailed, color-coded spreadsheet, most hiring managers would love to know that because it says something about the kind of attention to detail you’d bring to the job. That’s not something you could put on your résumé, but it can go in your cover letter.

Or maybe your last boss told you that you were the most accurate data processor she’d ever seen, or came to rely on you as her go-to person whenever a lightning-fast rewrite was needed. Maybe your co-workers called you “the client whisperer” because of your skill in calming upset clients. Maybe you’re regularly sought out by more senior staff to help problem-solve, or you find immense satisfaction in bringing order to chaos. Those sorts of details illustrate what you bring to the job in a different way than your résumé does, and they belong in your cover letter.

If you’re still stumped, pretend you’re writing an email to a friend about why you’d be great at the job. You probably wouldn’t do that by stiffly reciting your work history, right? You’d talk about what you’re good at and how you’d approach the work. That’s what you want here.

You don’t need a creative opening line.

If you think you need to open the letter with something creative or catchy, I am here to tell you that you don’t. Just be simple and straightforward:

• “I’m writing to apply for your X position.”

• “I’d love to be considered for your X position.”

• “I’m interested in your X position because …”

• “I’m excited to apply for your X position.”

That’s it! Straightforward is fine — better, even, if the alternative is sounding like an aggressive salesperson.

Show, don’t tell.

A lot of cover letters assert that the person who wrote it would excel at the job or announce that the applicant is a skillful engineer or a great communicator or all sorts of other subjective superlatives. That’s wasted space — the hiring manager has no reason to believe it, and so many candidates claim those things about themselves that most managers ignore that sort of self-assessment entirely. So instead of simply declaring that you’re great at X (whatever X is), your letter should demonstrate that. And the way you do that is by describing accomplishments and experiences that illustrate it.

Here’s a concrete example taken from one extraordinarily effective cover-letter makeover that I saw. The candidate had originally written, “I offer exceptional attention to detail, highly developed communication skills, and a talent for managing complex projects with a demonstrated ability to prioritize and multitask.” That’s pretty boring and not especially convincing, right? (This is also exactly how most people’s cover letters read.)

In her revised version, she wrote this instead:

“In addition to being flexible and responsive, I’m also a fanatic for details — particularly when it comes to presentation. One of my recent projects involved coordinating a 200-page grant proposal: I proofed and edited the narratives provided by the division head, formatted spreadsheets, and generally made sure that every line was letter-perfect and that the entire finished product conformed to the specific guidelines of the RFP. (The result? A five-year, $1.5 million grant award.) I believe in applying this same level of attention to detail to tasks as visible as prepping the materials for a top-level meeting and as mundane as making sure the copier never runs out of paper.”

That second version is so much more compelling and interesting — and makes me believe that she really is great with details.

If there’s anything unusual or confusing about your candidacy, address it in the letter.

Your cover letter is your chance to provide context for things that otherwise might seem confusing or less than ideal to a hiring manager. For example, if you’re overqualified for the position but are excited about it anyway, or if you’re a bit underqualified but have reason to think you could excel at the job, address that up front. Or if your background is in a different field but you’re actively working to move into this one, say so, talk about why, and explain how your experience will translate. Or if you’re applying for a job across the country from where you live because you’re hoping to relocate to be closer to your family, let them know that.

If you don’t provide that kind of context, it’s too easy for a hiring manager to decide you’re the wrong fit or applying to everything you see or don’t understand the job description and put you in the “no” pile. A cover letter gives you a chance to say, “No, wait — here’s why this could be a good match.”

Keep the tone warm and conversational.

While there are some industries that prize formal-sounding cover letters — like law — in most fields, yours will stand out if it’s warm and conversational. Aim for the tone you’d use if you were writing to a co-worker whom you liked a lot but didn’t know especially well. It’s okay to show some personality or even use humor; as long as you don’t go overboard, your letter will be stronger for it.

Don’t use a form letter.

You don’t need to write every cover letter completely from scratch, but if you’re not customizing it to each job, you’re doing it wrong. Form letters tend to read like form letters, and they waste the chance to speak to the specifics of what this employer is looking for and what it will take to thrive in this particular job.

If you’re applying for a lot of similar jobs, of course you’ll end up reusing language from one letter to the next. But you shouldn’t have a single cover letter that you wrote once and then use every time you apply; whatever you send should sound like you wrote it with the nuances of this one job in mind.

A good litmus test is this: Could you imagine other applicants for this job sending in the same letter? If so, that’s a sign that you haven’t made it individualized enough to you and are probably leaning too heavily on reciting your work history.

No, you don’t need to hunt down the hiring manager’s name.

If you read much job-search advice, at some point you’ll come across the idea that you need to do Woodward and Bernstein–level research to hunt down the hiring manager’s name in order to open your letter with “Dear Matilda Jones.” You don’t need to do this; no reasonable hiring manager will care. If the name is easily available, by all means, feel free to use it, but otherwise “Dear Hiring Manager” is absolutely fine. Take the hour you just freed up and do something more enjoyable with it.

Keep it under one page.

If your cover letters are longer than a page, you’re writing too much, and you risk annoying hiring managers who are likely sifting through hundreds of applications and don’t have time to read lengthy tomes. On the other hand, if you only write one paragraph, it’s unlikely that you’re making a compelling case for yourself as a candidate — not impossible, but unlikely. For most people, something close to a page is about right.

Don’t agonize over the small details.

What matters most about your cover letter is its content. You should of course ensure that it’s well-written and thoroughly proofread, but many job seekers agonize over elements of the letter that really don’t matter. I get tons of  questions from job seekers  about whether they should attach their cover letter or put it in the body of the email (answer: No one cares, but attaching it makes it easier to share and will preserve your formatting), or what to name the file (again, no one really cares as long as it’s reasonably professional, but when people are dealing with hundreds of files named “resume,” it’s courteous to name it with your full name).

Approaching your cover letter like this can make a huge difference in your job search. It can be the thing that moves your application from the “maybe” pile (or even the “no” pile) to the “yes” pile. Of course, writing cover letters like this will take more time than sending out the same templated letter summarizing your résumé — but 10 personalized, compelling cover letters are likely to get you more  interview invitations  than 50 generic ones will.

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by The Cut; Photos: Getty Images

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  1. How To Write A Cover Letter: Useful Tips, Phrases and Examples

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COMMENTS

  1. What to include in a cover letter for a teenager: a guide

    The cover letter is where you have the opportunity to briefly explain your background, your achievements in the area, your skills and any other relevant information that you think is worth highlighting. A great cover letter captures the interest of an employer and makes them want to read the rest of your application.

  2. How to Write a Cover Letter as a Teenager: Tips and Templates

    Tips for Writing a Cover Letter as a Teenager. Start with a strong opening: The opening sentence of your cover letter should grab the reader's attention and make them want to read on. Consider starting with a relevant anecdote or a statement that highlights your enthusiasm for the job. Highlight your relevant skills and experiences: Even if ...

  3. Cover Letter Examples for Teenagers: Tips and Templates for Landing

    The cover letter is your chance to make a lasting impression on potential employers. As a teenager, crafting a cover letter can be an intimidating task, but with careful planning and some insider tips, you can create a document that makes you stand out. Here are some tips for writing a cover letter as a teenager.

  4. How to Write a Cover Letter for Teens

    Body. Connect your qualifications to the needs of the job. Use examples of skills or achievements from your resume that make you a strong candidate. Use words from the job description throughout your cover letter. If an employer is looking to hire someone with "strong communication skills," write that you have "strong communication skills ...

  5. Example Cover Letter for Teenager

    Land a job that can kick-start your successful career with this proficiently-written cover letter sample for teens. You can use this example at no cost or easily modify it in our intuitive cover letter builder. This cover letter was written by our experienced resume writers specifically for this profession. Create your cover letter now or edit ...

  6. Best Cover Letter Example for a 16-Year-Old [+6 Tips]

    Cover Letter for a 16 Year Old Resume. April 13, 2022. Dear Mr. Myers: As a fresh and energetic high school student, I am applying for the Receptionist position at Ziegler Enterprises. I believe I have the skills and enthusiasm needed to perform the job effectively.

  7. Cover Letter Examples for Students

    A (if you don't know the name of the person hiring you can say "Dear Hiring Manager" or "To whom it May Concern,". Paragraph 1: state the job you are applying for and where you heard about it. Note in this paragraph if anyone in particular referred you for the job. Provide a quick overview of your experience.

  8. Resume Examples for Teens: Template and Writing Tips

    Read more: Top Resume Formats: Tips and Examples of 3 Common Resumes. 2. Make your contact details easy to find. You want it to be easy for a recruiter to contact you by ensuring that your contact details are clear. Include your name, phone number, email address and the city and state where you live.

  9. How to Write a Cover Letter for a Job in 2024

    Respectfully, Kind regards, Best regards, Yours truly, Then, make two spaces below the salutation, and type your full name. For some professional (but optional) flair, sign your cover letter either with a scan of your signature or by using software like DocuSign. 8. Check your cover letter's content and formatting.

  10. How To Write a Cover Letter (With Examples and Tips)

    Middle paragraph (s) Closing paragraph. Letter ending and signature. Your cover letter should be one page long and use a simple, professional font, such as Arial or Helvetica, 10 to 12 points in size. Your letter should be left-aligned with single spacing and one-inch margins. Show Transcript.

  11. How to Write a Cover Letter for Students

    Proofread. Run a spelling and grammar check. Read your cover letter out loud to catch any long-winded sentences or awkward transitions. Get a parent or friend to proofread for typos. Double-check that the hiring manager's name is spelled correctly. Your cover letter should be as clean as a whistle before you hit send.

  12. How to Write a Great Cover Letter in 2024 (+ Examples)

    1. Personalization. Address the hiring manager or recruiter by name whenever possible. If the job posting doesn't include a name, research to find out who will be reviewing applications. Personalizing your cover letter shows that you've taken the time to tailor your application to the specific company and role. 2.

  13. How To Write a Youth Worker Cover Letter (With Template and ...

    How to write a cover letter for a youth worker. You can use these steps to help you write a cover letter for a youth worker position: 1. Create a header. It's often a good idea to create a header on a cover letter, much like on a resume. You can place your name at the top, followed by your address, phone number and email address.

  14. How to Write a Cover Letter (Expert Tips & Examples)

    Write a clear and professional subject line that includes the job title and your name. Compose a brief message in the body of the email, introducing yourself and stating the position you are applying for. Attach your cover letter and resume to the email, making sure they are properly named and labeled.

  15. How to Write a Cover Letter [Full Guide & Examples for 2024]

    start your cover letter. with your contact details at the top. These should be in your cover letter's header, separated neatly from the bulk of your text. Here, you want to include all the essential contact information, including: Full Name. Your first and last name should stand out at the top. Job Title.

  16. Teenager Resume: Examples, Templates, and Writing Tips

    Cover Letter Builder Create your Cover Letter in 5 minutes. Land the job you want. Cover Letter Templates Find the perfect Cover Letter template.; Cover Letter Examples See perfect Cover Letter examples that get you jobs.; Cover Letter Format Choose the right Cover Letter format for your needs.; How to Write a Cover Letter Learn how to write a Cover Letter that lands you jobs.

  17. Resume Examples for Teens (With Template and Tips)

    Related: Jobs for 17-Year-Olds To Help You Build Professional Skills. 2. Make your contact details prominent. Make your contact information one of the first things people see when they look at your resume. Many people put their name and contact information in a larger font than the rest of the resume.

  18. 5 Cover Letter Examples for 15 Year Olds That Will Get You Hired

    Dear [Hiring Manager], I am writing to express my interest in the babysitting job you advertised on [Job Site]. As a responsible and caring 15-year-old, I am confident that I have the skills and qualities required for this job. Firstly, I have experience taking care of my younger siblings and cousins.

  19. Cover Letter for a High School Student (2024 Examples)

    This ensures the hiring manager has your contact information. For an emailed cover letter, include your email address, phone number and full name. For a paper cover letter, include your name, postal address, phone number and email address. 2. Greet the hiring manager. If you know the hiring manager's name, you can address them by name.

  20. How to write a youth worker cover letter (with example)

    Conclude your cover letter with a strong closing paragraph reiterating your interest in the position and your qualifications for the role. Thank the employer for considering your application. You may then suggest the best way to contact you and express your gratitude for the employer's time. 6. Closing salutation.

  21. 10 Cover Letter Examples for 17 Year Olds: Tips and Samples

    Here's the best structure for a cover letter for a 17-year-old. First and foremost, introduce yourself. State your name, age, and the position you are applying for. It's important to be upfront and honest about your age. You can mention any relevant experience or skills you possess that make you a suitable candidate for the job.

  22. Student Cover Letters With Template and Example

    Student cover letter example Here is a sample cover letter for a student that you can use as a guide to write an impressive cover letter of your own: Kellen Daniels 555-555-5555 [email protected] December 10, 2020 Dear Hiring Manager, I am a sophomore business major at Houston University writing to express my interest in the Online Advertising Intern opportunity at Blueprint Digital.

  23. How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

    If you think you need to open the letter with something creative or catchy, I am here to tell you that you don't. Just be simple and straightforward: • "I'm writing to apply for your X ...

  24. Resume Writing Tips for Teens (2024 Guide)

    Writing your resume may be easier if you have some examples to draw on. Here are two: Example resume for 14-year-old with no work experience Kate Smith Richmond, Melbourne 3121 [email protected] 0400 123 456 Objective Enthusiastic student with excellent academic record and artistic skills. I am looking for a retail position that will allow ...