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Writing Workshop: Everything You Need To Know To Create an Anchor Chart

1. writing workshop: anchor charts 101, 2. everything you need to know to create an anchor chart for writing workshop, 3. writing workshop: everything you need to know to create an anchor chart.

“I don’t have room for all these anchor charts in my classroom.”

Does this sound familiar?

I often found myself repeating this over and over again as a classroom teacher. And then, I’d wonder:

             What kind of anchor chart should I make?              How can I elevate the level of my anchor charts?             How long should I keep an anchor chart up?

Keep reading for the answers if you’ve ever asked yourself these questions.

Anchor charts are an essential tool used to support instruction.

As you teach, you use your anchor charts to capture strategies that students can refer back to during mini-lessons , small groups, and independent writing time . Anchor charts also help build a culture of literacy by making the thinking visible as well as supporting all different learners within your classroom (i.e., visual, auditory, ELLs).

Anchor charts are typically created in real-time with students during a mini-lesson. They can display both student and teacher thinking by including teacher and student writing samples.

Then, you can display them on the wall for students to refer back to. Make sure to update them throughout the school year. Read more below about the many different anchor charts you can create to enhance your teaching and student learning.

Types of Anchor Charts

1. Procedural Anchor Charts

Use procedural anchor charts to highlight routines and systems within your Writing Workshop block. You’ll likely introduce these charts at the beginning of the school year when launching the workshop. You can create a chart for each new routine or system you want to teach or revisit old ones that need extra practice throughout the school year. You can use the anchor chart in the image for primary grades (K-2) to establish a Writing Workshop set-up routine.

writers workshop anchor charts

2. Writing Behaviors Charts

Writing behavior anchor charts highlight behaviors we want our writers to build into habits. As your writers become more sophisticated throughout the school year, you want to make sure that your behavior charts match the level of your writers. You can use the anchor chart below to help establish stamina. Students can visibly see their goal as well as their progress as they work on building their stamina.

EXPERT TIP: Once your students build a writing habit, you can retire the anchor chart.

3. Individual Strategy Charts

Individual strategy charts focus on a single writing strategy. They aim to break down the strategy into clear, bite-sized steps that you’ll model during the teach section of a mini-lesson. Each unit of study cycles through the writing process (generating, choosing/developing, planning, drafting, editing, revising/elaborating).

Along the way, you introduce your writers to different strategies within each part of the writing process. The right anchor chart focuses on the writing process’s generating portion. It introduces a single strategy students can use when generating ideas for a true story. While you teach using your anchor chart, it’s key that the words you use match what’s on the anchor chart. Example: Saying true stories on your chart but using the term ‘small moments’ while you demonstrate.

writers workshop anchor charts

4. Menu of Strategies Charts

If you’re introducing several additional strategies within that same part of the writing process, you can build a menu of strategies anchor chart. Unlike a zoomed-in strategy chart, a menu of strategies chart has several methods to select from. These charts give students the power to make their own decisions as to which one they want to use in their writing. The anchor chart to the left has five different strategies that

students can choose from when generating ideas for a personal narrative.

writers workshop anchor charts

EXPERT TIP: Once you’ve introduced a strategy to add to the menu chart, you can retire the individual strategy chart.

5. Process Charts

Process charts are an excellent way to set your students up for independence by supporting them in understanding where to go next in their writing. These types of charts highlight a certain part of the writing process within a genre and can be displayed throughout a unit of study.

EXPERT TIP: Make small samples of anchor charts for students to keep in their writing folders.

6. Characteristics of the Genre Charts

Genre charts highlight characteristics of a genre, such as topics, text features, structure, tone, and author’s purpose. You can make these charts during the immersion week when highlighting craft moves and techniques of a specific genre. The anchor chart to the right highlights the characteristics of narrative writing.

writers workshop anchor charts

7. Exemplar Piece Charts

This chart is a key lever during immersion week. You can also create it with your writer’s input. It highlights the characteristics of a strong writing piece. The chart is a living, breathing document which students can revise as they learn more about the genre and develop their level of sophistication. The anchor chart below highlights certain characteristics of an informational writing piece, such as catchy subtitles, pictures, and captions.

writers workshop anchor charts

EXPERT TIP: While students are editing and revising, it can be helpful to reintroduce this chart and remind them what they can approximate from other writers!

8. Checklists Charts

Editing checklist charts help students monitor their progress during the revision and editing process. Make copies so students can refer back to them in their folders. Often, students will be in different stages of the writing process, so it’s helpful to have something to reference. These charts can be revised as students learn more throughout the unit and learn more sophisticated skills.

Expert Tips for Effective Anchor Charts

There are many different ways to improve your anchor charts. Below are three ways you can elevate your anchor charts.

1. Add visuals: One way to raise the level of your charts and support your learners is to add visuals. This is essential for our primary readers and writers to be more independent when using charts. These visuals ideally match your teacher demonstration piece. For example, if you are writing about using a big feeling, such as being excited to generate small moments you can write about, include a visual of those feelings on the anchor chart. You can also include drawings, print out clipart, or add photographs of your student doing the steps or process.

2. Include examples from mentor texts: You can include examples from mentor texts that have already been introduced and read to your class. These examples can be photocopied and placed directly on the chart.

writers workshop anchor charts

3. Include writing samples demonstrating the writing strategy: Writing samples can be either teacher or student created. These can be used on anchor charts to show a model example of the strategy.

writers workshop anchor charts

Anchor Chart Maintenance

Anchor charts are most helpful when students see and use them! Make sure you have a designated place in your room to display your workshop charts. It’s useful when all writing charts are together in one area. When using anchor charts during Writing Workshop, make sure to display them in a clutter-free space in your gathering area.

Once you have introduced your chart during your mini-lesson, you should be referencing it consistently throughout and every time you state the teaching point. Following your mini-lesson, keep the anchor chart visible for all students to reference as they work independently. This also allows you to reference the charts while conferring, in small groups, and during partnership work. You can also refer to the chart at the end of the workshop during the teaching share.

Decide if you’ll display or retire the chart by surveying your writers. If you retire a chart and you have the space, keep it. If not, take a picture of it. If you continue to display the chart, place it in a clutter-free, prominent spot designated for workshop charts. You can create smaller versions for students to put in their folders or keep them at the writing center.

EXPERT TIP: A great way to know when to retire a chart is to survey your students and ask, “who uses this chart?” If a small number of students use the chart, you can make smaller individualized copies for those students and take down the original.

Whether you’re just getting started with creating anchor charts or have been doing them for a while, hopefully, some of these ideas might be helpful for you as you think about which type of anchor charts you can make, how to elevate your anchor charts, and how long you should keep an anchor chart up.

Keep exploring with these articles:

  • Setting Up a Writing Center: 8 Basics
  • The Writing Process for Primary Grades
  • Supporting English Language Learners in Writing Workshop

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Cara Carroll

Writer’s Workshop Anchor Charts

September 1, 2011

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Reader Interactions

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September 1, 2011 at 12:16 am

What a fun blog post! My class is getting ready to create their heart maps…Love this time of year…when everything is new to our little firsties! Even if I'm exhausted and ready to pass out on my couch by the end of the day! Ha!

September 1, 2011 at 12:17 am

I love your anchor charts. They are so cute and kid friendly. Thanks for the inspiration!

Swimming into Second

September 1, 2011 at 12:29 am

This week we are studying pets in 2nd grade and I wanted to light my "littles" love of writing as well!! Tomorrow we are doing a whole group writing activity because my kids are all over the place in abilities. We are stating three reasons why it would be fun to have a dog, using our writing journals for the first time, and then possibly publishing our writing and attaching them to dog bowls!

Your anchor charts are so cute and I love that you show real life connections!

September 1, 2011 at 12:31 am

Your anchor charts are so adorable! I wish I could draw that well…mine would be a hot mess. I love doing heart maps! We actually put our heart maps inside the front of our writers notebooks so they can refer to it all year! Rambling About Reading

September 1, 2011 at 12:39 am

You are such an amazing artist as well as a teacher! You make your anchor charts so exciting and cute!

Jodi fun-in-first.blogspot.com

September 1, 2011 at 12:46 am

@Miss Erin…GREAT idea!!

@Jess…I'm SO going to "borrow" your idea 😉 Definitely putting them on the front of their notebooks! LOVE IT!!

@Jodi & Courtney…y'all are too dang sweet 🙂 THank you!

@Gladys…yes…LOVE IT when everything is "new"! The novelty hasn't worn off yet! HA!!

September 1, 2011 at 1:01 am

Hey Mrs. Carroll! I teach 4th/5th grade ELL and our district is just starting Writer's Workshop officially this year. I can't wait!

I LOVE LOVE LOVE your anchor charts! I also love your examples of what people write–what a great visual. Thanks for all of the inspiration for a Writer's Workshop newcomer! 🙂 Kristen

September 1, 2011 at 1:07 am

LOVE your ideas and posters!! I'll be making a few more now! THANKS for sharing.

http://firstgradelyonsden.blogspot.com/

September 1, 2011 at 1:11 am

Oh my, I love the anchor charts too! Thank you for sharing! LOVE IT! Can't wait to see the next one 🙂

Jenn @ The Kinder Life

September 1, 2011 at 1:13 am

LOVE your anchor charts! We started writer's workshop this past week, and it is so different than what we did last year. In a good way! I taught my class a gesture for what writers write about. "Writers write about what they know about (point to their head) and what they care about (cross their hands over their chest)" It seemed to help when they dove in to first workshop session of writing freedom!

-Ms. Thomas

The First Grade Jungle

September 1, 2011 at 1:19 am

just posted about WW and then saw your post. You are so talented. I think half the reason I got into teaching was chart paper and markers. 🙂

September 1, 2011 at 1:37 am

Hi Cara! I LOVE your blog and have been quietly following for a while. Do you use a specific curriculum or come up with your own plans? I'm trying to be more focused w/ my writing instruction this year and would love to know how you organize your lessons. THANKS!! 🙂

September 1, 2011 at 1:57 am

Cara, your anchor charts are AMAZING and amazingly perfect! Do you create the art {on the actual charts shown in the pics} as you discuss it with your class, or do you do a rough draft and then create those beautiful masterpieces from your draft? Primary Practice

September 1, 2011 at 2:21 am

There is a great book called The Map Book it is sooo great to use with a lesson like your doing tomorrow. It gives them pictures of all types of maps! It's a great tool!

I"m super impressed with your anchor charts! Do you make them that in depth right there in front of them each day?

September 1, 2011 at 2:33 am

Oh sweet girls…thank y'all! I DO NOT make my anchor charts that in depth in front of them…that would take FOREVER {and seriously, they can only sit still for about 3 minutes}. SO…I make a "sloppy copy" in front of them {basically a quick sketch}. Then I use a smaller sheet of paper, redraw everything we talked about, laminate, and hang. I like having smaller anchor charts so they "fit" in all my nooks and crannies 🙂

@Ms. Thomas…AWESOME idea!!!! I'm using that for sure!!!

@Kristen…you'll LOVE it!

September 1, 2011 at 3:18 am

your handwriting and drawing is beautiful!

September 1, 2011 at 3:59 am

Oh my! LOVE all the anchor charts! So stinkin' cute! Wanted to let you know that I featured your Chrysanthemum idea on my blog. Thanks for sharing your creativity. Allison http://www.room-mom101.blogspot.com

September 1, 2011 at 4:08 am

Maybe a random question…..but what type of markers do you use on your final copy charts? I LOVE them!

September 1, 2011 at 4:25 am

I LOVE your anchor charts. You've inspired me to try something similar 🙂 Thank you.

❀Barbara❀ Grade ONEderful

September 1, 2011 at 5:05 am

I heart your anchor charts!!! Writing is my weakest area and so I am LOVING all these ideas! Thank you for the inspiration!

September 1, 2011 at 9:55 am

thanks so much! going to make brain maps with my fourth graders! fun!

September 1, 2011 at 9:09 pm

I love your Writers workshop ideas and anchor charts! Your blog is a HUGE source of inspiration to me–I check it often. Thank you!

September 1, 2011 at 9:48 pm

Wow! Your anchor charts are awesome! You have definitely inspired me to make mine more "kid-friendly". Thank you!

Sara 🙂 http://smilinginsecondgrade.blogspot.com

September 1, 2011 at 11:33 pm

I love your anchor charts… I hope you don't mind but I love following you and using your things in my classroom. Check out my blog. I've posted about your resources :).

http://thesweetlifeofasecondgradeteacher.com

September 1, 2011 at 11:56 pm

Hi Mrs. Carroll! I love all of your writing ideas and you have totally inspired me to make some cute little anchor charts! You mentioned your Draft Books – how exactly do those work? I just started teaching 1st this year and could defintely use some help in writing!

September 2, 2011 at 12:28 am

@Amy Wiltse…I used regular ol' Crayola Markers! HA!! Markers for the title and then crayons for the pics. I outline my pics with a fine tip sharpie 🙂 HOpe that helps!!

@Mrs. Bonert…our draft books are just basically our writing folders. We write in them EVERYday. As the year progresses, we'll change out the paper to smaller lines because they'll be writing so much more. They write in their draft books AFTER a little minilesson. Sometimes I'll give them direction in their writing…like maybe focusing on writing with lowercase letters, using capitals at the beginning of sentences, etc. It's awesome to see the progress throughout the year!!

September 2, 2011 at 12:39 am

I am in love with those charts!!! I just pinned them!

September 2, 2011 at 1:25 am

Ms. Carroll- I love your anchor charts and the drawings are SO cute!! Thanks so much for sharing so much with the blog world! I wish I were in your class!

September 2, 2011 at 1:43 am

I adore your blog and think your kids would love my "litter box learning" center I put in word work. It's great for the beginning of the year because all the kids can do it!

mrsjamesfirstgrade.blogspot.com

September 2, 2011 at 1:56 am

Sorry to bug you again, but what are the mini offices? That one really has me interested! Thanks for answering my other question – that really helps!

September 2, 2011 at 2:21 am

Cara, You are so kind and generous to share your tips and methods as well as your ideas and printables. Thank you so much for helping me to become a better teacher. I am always trying to learn something new so that I may continue to bring my best to my students.

Now that you have explained how you "rough draft" your anchor charts with the class, and finalize them solo, I feel more confident about creating my own "display-worthy" charts!

Inspiration and professional development all rolled up into one amzing blog 🙂 Primary Practice

September 2, 2011 at 12:14 pm

Cute anchor charts!!

I always love your ideas!

September 2, 2011 at 3:26 pm

You so rock! Can't wait to make these too. Love them! Can I hire you to draw them? haha Donna

September 2, 2011 at 3:28 pm

I just wanted to let you know I LOVE your blog! Thank you sooo much for sharing!

September 2, 2011 at 6:57 pm

Cara, you are such an inspiration! I just LOVE your blog and all of your wonderful ideas!!! Teaching writing is an area where I feel like I can always improve! I was wondering how you come up with your lessons for writing workshop? Do you have any good resources that you wouldn't mind sharing. Also, is your writing folder just a regular folder that you have added paper to??? Could you explain more? Maybe a post about your writing workshop??? 🙂 Thanks SO SO much!! Amy

September 3, 2011 at 7:19 am

As a teacher in the UK my classroom may be a little different but instilling a love of writing is still top of my agenda when we start back after the summer holidays next week. Many thanks for sharing your great ideas

September 4, 2011 at 6:37 pm

As always, I love reading your blog!!! Amazing ideas.

Thank you Mireya [email protected]

September 6, 2011 at 12:21 am

Thank you for using my map of my heart that i did with some Year 3 girls. Mine was the centre heart which we completed with fine liners and water colour pencils. We loved the activity and i have seen it so many more times on blogs lately. Definitely an activity to add to the list of must do again.

http://thirteenredshoes.blogspot.com/

October 27, 2011 at 12:30 am

I love your Writer's Workshop Anchor Charts and I look forward to your pins on Pinterest! Thank you for all you share:)

November 25, 2011 at 11:30 pm

Really like your writing anchor chart, very eye-catching!

Would love if you would check out my blog, although it's in the beginning stages : )

http://www.talesfromatravelingteacher.blogspot.com

Thanks, Kelli

January 14, 2012 at 3:45 pm

Hey Cara ~ One of your obsessed followers here on your Blog and on Pinterest. You may have addressed this already so my apologies… Obviously, you are most creative; do you actually make your anchor charts with your students or do you have these prepared ahead of time or use charts previously made. I LOVE how eye-catching all of yours are but I know how much time I take writing the simplest of charts. I would love to be a child in your class or a teacher on your team. Thank you for sharing!

February 23, 2012 at 2:10 am

I just found your blog! I love the anchor charts. When you have a chance come check out my blog.

April Wolfelicious

February 23, 2012 at 3:51 am

I love that you covered WHAT writers write! I think that too often we forget about this important part and even as a 3rd grade teacher, this would be an important portion of learning the purpose. Kids are always so interested in our personal lives and bringing in real life examples of your own writing is a great way to make it really authentic.

February 27, 2012 at 3:24 am

I feel less alone in the world of teaching knowing that you and your pals are out there. I love how you show that ACTUALLY TEACHING the standards and having FUN Fun Fun along the way IS possible. Too many of my teacher pals spend ages doing fluff without content. ACADEMIC RIGOR is the buzz word in my district, but I love rigor and JOY at the same time, and you get that! Thank you for the boost of inspiration! I have told so many "like-minded" teachers about your blog, and they all say the same thing…amazing. Well done!

March 23, 2012 at 4:05 am

LOVE your anchor charts! I'm having an anchor chart linky party with a twist! All links will be included in a PDF with pictures and links to sources and offered for free via download. This way we all have access to lots of great anchor chart ideas/resources at our fingertips! Please consider heading over to my blog and linking up! I'd love to include yours! 🙂 -Lacey Wild about Teaching!

March 2, 2013 at 9:22 pm

Love it! May I use your pictures on my blog (I just started, and the blog is a resource for one of my Masters courses) I will give you credit and post a link to your blog if that is alright. Thanks!

March 18, 2013 at 10:37 pm

I just began my writer's workshop today with my first grade special ed kids. We are ALL already enjoying it! Thanks!

September 6, 2013 at 4:11 pm

Thanks. I like it.

September 6, 2013 at 4:12 pm

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Anchor charts for your writing workshop.

Google Anchor Charts for Writing Workshop

When I was offered my first teaching position I did three things: 1. I jumped up and down. 2. I bought some “teacher” clothes. 3. I went to the teacher supply store and bought a bunch of decorations and posters. Then I took those decorations and posters to my classroom in my new teacher shirt and pants and began decorating room 29. Once school began, I soon discovered my cute posters weren’t being used by my students. Didn’t they know how useful they were? I mean who wouldn’t love houses with multiplication facts running up and down them? Eventually I learned these premade posters weren’t all they were cracked up to be, which led me to creating my own anchor charts.

Google Writers Workshop Elementary School

We’ve all made anchor charts. And many teachers make them in different ways. Sometimes anchor charts are made ahead of time. Maybe they’re made while the kids watch and plenty of teachers have their students help them make the anchor charts. Whichever you choose, it’s important to make charts you will actually refer to and charts students will find useful. Here is a great article you can check out to learn more about anchor charts.

Writing workshop has many components and requires some charts for students to refer to. Eventually, you’ll be able to remove some of the charts as students begin to make the parts of writing workshop a routine.

Google Anchor Charts for Writing Workshop

Writing Workshop Structure

The best way to introduce writing workshop to your students is to tell them what to expect in this writing workshop outline. Kids love knowing where we’re going and how long until we get there. This writing workshop description explains to students what their job entails and what your job will be. It shows them the writing workshop structure and in the order you’ll be engaging in each piece. You might want to add times to the anchor chart for the kids that need even more information about what to expect. If you are in need of more information about writing workshop, read Writing Workshop for Beginners , which will provide you with some extra support.

Google Writing Workshop Structure

Getting Ready Anchor Chart

This, by far, is the most important anchor chart to start writing workshop. The “getting ready” chart sets the students up for the mini lesson and prepares them for writing. This post, Procedures and Routines for Writing Workshop , provides some writing workshop tips for incorporating these procedures.

In this chart students take out their writing folder, read the book they’re working on, and go to the meeting area. Having them read their piece before the mini lesson, jogs their memories of what they are writing about.

Google Writing Workshop Elementary School

When I’m Finished Anchor Chart

“Done!” Teachers’ number one least favorite word. Ugh. Before you have kids telling you they’re finished and asking what to do next, tell them what to do. As a matter of fact, have an anchor chart for that. Review this chart often, especially at the beginning of the school year. When a student ask what to do next, just point to the chart.

Google Writing Workshop Charts

An Anchor Chart to Wrap Up Writing Workshop

The share is the last part of writing workshop and as precious as this time can be, it can also be a challenge. Having students share their work is a great way for students to learn from their peers. But when you have a student share that isn’t prepared, you lose the rest of the class. This is why the number one procedure for share time is to have the student sharing practice reading his/her writing. Once the student is ready to share, the others are listening and ready to retell what they heard in the student’s book. Then students will offer feedback, which is another anchor chart all together!

Google Writing Workshop Poster

Teacher and student made anchor charts are valuable when referred to throughout the year. They provide information for students and help them become more self reliant. Anchor charts for writing workshop are also helpful for teachers in that they hold us responsible and remind us of the procedures. There are plenty more writing workshop charts you can create for your classroom, but here are a few to give you an idea of what they could look like. The posters don’t need to be fancy, they just need to be used.

If you’re in need of ideas for keeping your writing workshop organized, I have a plenty of ideas for you in Classroom Organization for a Successful Writing Workshop . These tips along with useful anchor charts will set you up for writing workshop success!

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writers workshop anchor charts

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DOWNLOAD: Writing Workshop Anchor Charts

Awesome are you ready to get new resources, for your writing workshop, start by downloading our collection of 12, free anchor charts below, anchor charts for writing workshop, if you are new to writing workshop, you might also be interested in our comprehensive collection of free writing workshop materials and tutorials: creating a dynamic writing workshop.

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Out of this World Literacy

Literacy Resources from Jen Bengel

October 3, 2022

How to Teach Narratives Using Anchor Charts and Mentor Texts

writers workshop anchor charts

Teaching students how to identify and write personal narratives is something we all do each year. Anchor charts are an effective way to help students learn about this genre. It is easy to incorporate both reading and writing during workshop time. Everything that you need to teach this literacy unit is provided for you. This includes the lessons, mentor texts, anchor charts, student recording sheets, graphic organizers, and independent practice. Let's take a look at reading workshop. Although there are 10 genres available for each grade level, we will be focusing on personal narratives. There are enough lessons to help you successfully teach this unit for an entire month.

How to Begin Teaching Personal Narratives

writers workshop anchor charts

Whether you are teaching personal narrative or another genre, the format for reading and writing workshop remains the same. All of the lessons follow the format above. Start with an introduction. The next step is to model what you are teaching for the class. You can do this by using the mentor texts that are provided for you in the unit.

writers workshop anchor charts

Then, invite the students to help you as they are thinking out loud while adding their thoughts to the anchor chart. Next, engage all learners as you have them turn and talk and find more examples to add to the anchor chart. You can have them continue using the mentor text. Finally, the students will be transitioned into independent time. Students will apply the skills that they have just learned by using their own books during independent reading time.

Using Anchor Charts

Anchor charts are a great way to model and display the information you are teaching. Start by writing the mini-lesson objective at the top. You can prepare this step and the categories in advance.

writers workshop anchor charts

Choose a mentor text. This can either be from one of your own books, or from a mentor text that is provided for you. Read the story to the students. Model for the information from the text that matches the mini-lesson. Record this information on the anchor chart. Next, have volunteers point out other information from the story and record their responses on the anchor chart. Finally, have students work together by using a turn and talk. Using collaboration helps to build confidence with students. Record additional information on the anchor chart.

writers workshop anchor charts

After students have mastered the mini-lesson, send them off to work on their own. Graphic organizers are provided for students to record the examples that they find from their own personal book boxes. The writing workshop lessons build upon the same mini-lesson taught during reading so that students can apply their learning in their writing.

What's Included in the Personal Narratives Unit?

  • 20 reading and 20 writing mini lessons all linked to the  Common Core and TEKS standards!
  • Students note-taking pages for all 40 lessons. Perfect to glue into reading and writing notebooks and keep the learning going all year long.
  • 20 printable graphic organizers designed specifically for each reading lesson.
  • 20 printable think mark graphic organizers for each reading lesson.
  • Writing rubrics for grading.
  • Writing editing and revising checklists.
  • Sample completed anchor charts for several lessons.
  • Mentor texts are INCLUDED!  7 2-page original mentor texts with custom illustrations are included to support the reading and writing lessons.
  • TONS of teacher pages for organizing, conferencing, assessing, and note-taking.

Looking for Other Genres?

  • Historical Fiction
  • Informational
  • Personal Narrative
  • Realistic Fiction
  • Traditional Literature

The above lessons are from the 3rd Grade Literacy Units. To see units for other grade levels, click the links below:

  • 2nd Grade Literacy Units
  • 3rd Grade Literacy Units
  • 4th Grade Literacy Units
  • 5th Grade Literacy Units
  • 6th Grade Literacy Units

Refer to this blog post on how to set up reading notebooks. 3 Steps to Creating the Best Reading Notebooks

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Launching Writer’s Workshop in the Primary Classroom

Teacher Truth- I used to despise teaching Writer’s Workshop. I understood the structure of the workshop model and the focus of each grading period, however, I didn’t really know WHAT to teach each day during my mini-lessons. Fast forward a couple of years, and I had an amazing opportunity to visit an amazing teacher’s classroom and observe her in action and I fell in love with her writing instruction! And then the next year, my amazing team and I decided to each tackle one subject and share our plans. I chose writing (even though it still wasn’t my favorite) so I could spend more time learning about teaching writing and *hopefully* fall in love. It worked!

writers workshop anchor charts

Now that I LOVE writing, I wanted to share what I currently do to launch Writer’s Workshop! I’ve taken pieces from what I love from different resources to make what works for me and my students. This post is a little peek into my mini-lessons, anchor charts, and mentor texts that I love! I posted them in the order that I usually teach each lesson, however you can change them around to make it work for you and your group of writers! For each lesson I shared an example of an anchor chart! In my classroom, I always prepped the anchor charts with the title and an image first, but added the content WITH my students during the mini-lesson!  The books that I have posted are linked to my Amazon affiliate store. If you purchase them through the link, I will receive a small commission!

writers workshop anchor charts

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Reader’s and Writer’s Workshop Anchor Chart Freebies

Hi Friends! Today I am coming to you with a simple blog post that is all about passing on what has worked for me to you! We all know how important anchor charts are for our young readers and writers. This year I took what I have learned from Lucy Calkins and Jennifer Serravallo  to create additional anchor charts for my little friends. You can download all of them for FREE below!

writers workshop anchor charts

I have tried displaying anchor charts in a variety of ways. This year I had three different methods going.

The first was with the large anchor charts that I would create based off of the sticky note suggestions from Lucy Calkins Units of Study. I hung each chart on a ring on my white board on this magnetic curtain rod . It worked perfectly!

writers workshop anchor charts

For the anchor charts that were not full sized, I either did one of two things. The first thing was to just display it on my white board and take it down when we were done with the topic. The second thing was I printed the charts and put them in these binders for my students that they could prop in front of them like a tent!

writers workshop anchor charts

Now on to the freebies! To download any of the anchor charts below, just click the pictures or click HERE !

writers workshop anchor charts

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writers workshop anchor charts

Classroom Management

Classroom ideas, classroom community, writer’s workshop: what do writers do.

One of our very first writer’s workshop lessons is thinking about what writers actually do.

writers workshop anchor charts

I think most students have this idea that in order to be a writer, you have to sit a write a really long story, when in fact anyone who uses words to express an idea is a writer.

Writers make grocery lists, send text messages, write letters, send birthday invitations, fill out crossword puzzles, use sticky notes, write emails, write captions for photographs, and the list goes on and on. The idea is that we’re all writers!

I like to use the book Written Anything Good Lately  to get students to start thinking and noticing all the things writers write and do.

writers workshop anchor charts

After we read the book, we begin our “What Do Writers Do” anchor chart. The left is from last year, and the right is from this year. It’s always interesting to see what they come up with each year. We add to our list each day for about a week or so by asking, “Did anyone notice anything that writers do they’d like to add to our list?”

writers workshop anchor charts

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Writing Wall Inspiration

writers workshop anchor charts

The classroom walls can easily become overrun with too many anchor charts, posters, student work samples, and all that other important STUFF!  Last year, we made a change in my room that made a huge difference for my students. I decided to help them make sense of all that “background noise” by organizing the classroom into subject-focused walls.  We had a Math Wall, a Science Wall, a Reading Wall, a Word Study Wall, AND a Writing Wall.  Word Study and Writing had to share their wall, and Social Studies mostly ended up in the hallway, but it was a start!  Anchor charts, student work, and posters that went with that subject-area were grouped together.  The change was amazing for my students (and for me) and I’d never do it any other way now!

This post is all about my Writing Wall.  Of all the resources on the walls, students seemed to use this one the most!  I started the year with the basics: Writing Process posters, my 3rd grade writing expectations, and our revision and editing chart.

Writing Process Posters

We refer to the Writing Process posters often and in every unit, so these stay up year round.  These simple posters are from my Launching Writing Workshop pack.

writers workshop anchor charts

Classroom Writing Expectations Anchor Chart

Next up, I introduce my 3rd Grade Writing Pledge.  These are the NON-NEGOTIABLES!  We discuss, practice, and create examples of writing that meets these expectations and examples that do not.  (The kids love creating the non-examples.)  Students record these expectations in the front of the Writing Journal, too and we occasionally say this pledge out-loud, as a reminder.  This chart stays up for at least the first 6 – 9 weeks, and sometimes makes a few more appearances as needed!

The writing expectations on this anchor chart are the non-negotiables.

Revising and Editing Anchor Chart

The Revising and Editing Anchor Chart stays up for the first half of the year, even though it occasionally gets covered up by unit specific charts.  We refer back to this one A LOT.  Students create fold-ups of ARMS and COPS in their Writing Journals, but I notice they often just look back at the class chart.

Writing Wall Anchor Chart Revise and Edit

Other charts may come and go throughout the school year, such as Endings and Leads for Fiction, Showing Vs Telling, Persuasive Techniques, Procedural Writing Tips, etc.  I try to keep all the charts in the same area, often placing them right on top of one another.  This makes it easy for students to find what they need and to recall the information even after the charts are gone.  And the kids are always welcome to look back under the newer charts for past information.

writers workshop anchor charts

If you’re looking for more information on Writing Workshop, you can check out Launching Writing Workshop :

Launching Writing Workshop Resources

I also just finished a handy set that makes teaching Personal Narrative Writing easier than ever!!

writers workshop anchor charts

Thanks for reading! I’d love to hear your ideas on how to create a powerful writing wall! 🙂

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7 thoughts on “Writing Wall Inspiration”

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These are great ideas

' src=

How did you make the writing banner? Super cute!

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I found the banner in the Target $1 bins and wrote the letters on with a big marker! 🙂

' src=

I Love this i wish i could have more of that

' src=

Does this come with the poster of the writing pledge and COPS and ARMS poster??

' src=

Amazing ideas. I’m curious to know what you mean by “Students create fold-ups of ARMS and COPS in their Writing Journals.” Would you mind explaining that a little more? Thanks

They are just little tabbed note-takers that we keep in their journals for reference later. 🙂

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Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "What Do Good Writers Do?"

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writers workshop anchor charts

Description

Students can have a difficult time remembering all the things they need to do when they are writing! The anchor charts in this file will help them remember what good writers do !

The student cards and bookmarks are a great reference for the students when they are writing independently!

Included in this set:

✱small anchor charts (1 page) in 4 styles (Great for distance learning)

✱medium anchor charts (2 pages) with border in vertical and horizontal style

✱medium anchor charts (2 pages) without border in vertical style and horizontal style

✱medium blank anchor chart (2 pages) with border and separate words and graphics to Velcro on chart as you teach each skill

✱medium blank anchor chart (2 pages) without a border and separate words and graphics to Velcro on chart as you teach each skill in vertical style and horizontal style

✱word strips and graphics to use in a pocket chart or on chart paper

✱cards to use in a pocket chart or on chart paper with multi-color polka dot border

✱cards to use in a pocket chart or on chart paper without border

✱multi-color polka dot border to outline your chart

✱student cards with a border and without a border to use as a reference as they write independently (2 per page)

✱student cards with a border and without a border to use as a reference as they write independently (4 per page)

✱bookmarks to use during independent writing

The anchor charts are for using during your Writing Workshop mini-lesson. The topic is What Do Good Writers Do? The idea is to make it with your students, but still be able to use it year after year without having to continually recreate it. There are ready made anchor charts and charts you can Velcro pieces on.

You can also use the small versions of the anchor charts to show on the smart board or on a screen. This could stay up during their independent writing time for you to refer to as you are conferring.

We hope you find this helpful and you can utilize all the charts/posters with the kids! Happy Writing!

Here are some other writing anchor charts we offer:

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "What can I write about?"

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "What gets a capital letter?"

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "What do good Writers do?"

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "Writing Leads to catch the Reader's eye"

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "Punctuation Pals"

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "Can you Read my Writing?"

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "I use my Writer's Eye!"

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "Small Moment Writing"

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "Writing Pattern - Organizing my Story"

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart and bonus items ~ Call the Cops!

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "Writers can Write..."

• Writing Workshop Anchor Chart - "Good Writers use Time Order Words"

Please always view any available photos/preview before purchasing.

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IMAGES

  1. 28 Awesome Anchor Charts for Teaching Writing

    writers workshop anchor charts

  2. Writing Anchor Charts For Writing Workshop

    writers workshop anchor charts

  3. Writer's Workshop Mini-Anchor Charts by Teaching with Crayons and Curls

    writers workshop anchor charts

  4. Launch Writer's Workshop with these ready to print posters. These

    writers workshop anchor charts

  5. Anchor Charts for Your Writing Workshop

    writers workshop anchor charts

  6. All the Best Writing Anchor Charts for Kids

    writers workshop anchor charts

COMMENTS

  1. Writing Workshop: Everything You Need To Know To Create an Anchor Chart

    Below are three ways you can elevate your anchor charts. 1. Add visuals: One way to raise the level of your charts and support your learners is to add visuals. This is essential for our primary readers and writers to be more independent when using charts. These visuals ideally match your teacher demonstration piece.

  2. Writer's Workshop Anchor Charts

    Writer's Workshop Anchor Charts. I've always been a big fan of writing. I love to see the progress my kids make throughout the year…it's always so remarkable!! No matter what stage they're at when I get them, they always grow. Even a *little* growth is A LOT! I was excited to start Writer's Workshop this week.

  3. Writing Anchor Charts For Writing Workshop

    Writing Anchor Charts For Writing Workshop. $4.97. Launching writing workshop or even just setting up your writing block can feel overwhelming, but with the help of these anchor charts, you'll feel confident and prepared to set your students up for writing success this year. These writing workshop anchor charts and posters are perfect for ...

  4. Anchor Charts for Your Writing Workshop

    An Anchor Chart to Wrap Up Writing Workshop. The share is the last part of writing workshop and as precious as this time can be, it can also be a challenge. Having students share their work is a great way for students to learn from their peers. But when you have a student share that isn't prepared, you lose the rest of the class.

  5. PDF 25 Awesome Anchor Charts for Teaching Writing

    Writers Workshop 101 Source: Ms. Grochocki's Traditional Academy The beauty of this writers-workshop anchor chart, which could be used with any elementary grade, is that when you get to number 10, you're ready to return to number one. To make this chart a living part of your classroom, write each student's name on a clothespin and have

  6. DOWNLOAD: Writing Workshop Anchor Charts

    Anchor Charts for Writing Workshop If you are new to writing workshop, you might also be interested in our comprehensive collection of free writing workshop materials and tutorials: Creating a Dynamic Writing Workshop . Recent Posts. March Digital Calendar; February Digital Calendar; January Digital Calendar;

  7. All the Best Writing Anchor Charts for Kids

    18. OREO Opinion Writing. This deliciously inspired opinion anchor chart can be used by students in grades 3-5 during writers workshop or when developing an opinion for discussion or debate. To build out student writing, have them "double-stuff" their OREOs with extra E examples. See a video featuring this chart here.

  8. Writers Workshop Anchor Charts Teaching Resources

    Anchor chart pieces, mini-anchor charts for students' writer's notebooks, conferencing labels and sticky notes, goal setting pages are incl. Subjects: English Language Arts, Writing. Grades: 3 rd - 5 th. Types: Lesson. Also included in: Writers Workshop: Writing Workshop Lessons, Writer's Notebook, Posters, & More. $12.50.

  9. Whatever Is Writer's Workshop?

    I highly recommend using my What is Writer's Workshop Lesson Plot and Anchor Chart Freebie until teach my little writers what it's all about. This lesson schedule can be adapted for any class, K-8, and is a great way to go disable the year or for readjusting will writing zeit later a change in your schedule.

  10. How to Teach Narratives Using Anchor Charts and Mentor Texts

    Anchor charts are an effective way to help students learn about this genre. It is easy to incorporate both reading and writing during workshop time. Everything that you need to teach this literacy unit is provided for you. This includes the lessons, mentor texts, anchor charts, student recording sheets, graphic organizers, and independent practice.

  11. Launching Writer's Workshop in the Primary Classroom

    Now that I LOVE writing, I wanted to share what I currently do to launch Writer's Workshop! I've taken pieces from what I love from different resources to make what works for me and my students. This post is a little peek into my mini-lessons, anchor charts, and mentor texts that I love!

  12. Reader's and Writer's Workshop Anchor Chart Freebies

    To download any of the anchor charts below, just click the pictures or click HERE! Reader's Workshop Anchor Charts. Writer's Workshop Anchor Charts. Partner Anchor Chart. I hope that you are able to find these helpful in your classroom. I would love to see them in action and see some of the anchor charts that you have created! Post Views ...

  13. Writing Anchor Charts for Writer's Workshop

    Description. Writing anchor charts are a great way to remind your students of the key concepts and routines they have learned in class. This resource contains 12 posters that help with the basics of the primary Writers Workshop. These visuals are perfect for display around the classroom or as reminders during small group instruction.

  14. Writing Workshop Anchor Charts by The Stellar Teacher Company

    This ready-to-print bundle includes over 350 anchor charts to help you teach some of the key reading, writing, grammar, and vocabul. 18. Products. $ 45.00. $ 84.75. Save $ 39.75. View Bundle. Description Reviews 75 Q&A 1 More from The Stellar Teacher Company.

  15. What Is Writer's Workshop?

    Writing tends to be the subject that gets pushed to the side on those busy days… right along with science. (Just me?) This used to be because Science and Writing were my least 2 favorite subjects to teach, that is until I fell in love with The Science Penguin and Writer's Workshop. Writer's Workshop opens up a whole new world for writers.

  16. Writer's Workshop Anchor Charts by 1st Grade Salt Life

    Use these Writers Workshop anchor charts to help remind young writers of guidelines for writing/writer's workshop. This download includes 8 anchor charts to display in your classroom or keep in your students writing folder. Charts includ... Writer's Workshop Anchor Charts. Rated 4.86 out of 5, based on 172 reviews.

  17. Writing Anchor Charts Editable Center Poster Bundle

    Writing Anchor Charts Editable Center Poster Bundle. $ 40.00. This huge, time and money-saving bundle includes ALL of my Writing Workshop Anchor Charts. Each Writing Anchor Chart includes an individual student size (8.5×11) page and larger pieces to cut out and glue to large poster paper to create a super easy anchor chart you can reuse over ...

  18. Writer's Workshop: What Do Writers Do?

    One of our very first writer's workshop lessons is thinking about what writers actually do. I think most students have this idea that in order to be a writer, you have to sit a write a really long story, when in fact anyone who uses words to express an idea is a writer. Writers make grocery lists, send text messages, write letters, send ...

  19. Writing Wall Inspiration

    Writing Wall Inspiration. The classroom walls can easily become overrun with too many anchor charts, posters, student work samples, and all that other important STUFF! Last year, we made a change in my room that made a huge difference for my students. I decided to help them make sense of all that "background noise" by organizing the ...

  20. Writing Workshop Anchor Chart

    Products. $12.99 $43.25 Save $30.26. View Bundle. Reading and Writing Workshop Anchor Chart Bundle. Save time and money with our HUGE bundle! We combined our Reading Workshop Anchor Chart Bundle and our Writing Workshop Anchor Chart Bundle which gives you 58 anchor charts in total!The reading charts are a whole year of anchor charts for using ...

  21. The Writing Process Posters & Anchor Charts

    The Writing Process Posters & Anchor Charts. $4.00. Are you a 3rd, 4th, or 5th grade teacher who needs help teaching or reviewing the writing process with your students? These writing process anchor charts will help you teach the writing process in way that your students will remember. This set of anchor charts includes 13 ready-to-print anchor ...

  22. Writer's Workshop Anchor Charts for Back to School

    These simple Anchor Charts are made with components that are simple to print, cut, and glue! You can organize them however you'd like. The components are also editable so you can adjust them to your student's responses and focus! The topics are basic lessons that every writing teacher will be reviewing in the beginning of the school year, such as:

  23. Writing Workshop Anchor Chart

    Our development team has been informed of the issue. Students can have a difficult time remembering all the things they need to do when they are writing! The anchor charts in this file will help them remember what good writers do!The student cards and bookmarks are a great reference for the students when they are writing independently!Included ...