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New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

FILE - This 2014 illustration made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention depicts a polio virus particle. The polio virus has been found in New York City’s wastewater in another sign that the disease, which hadn’t been seen in the U.S. in a decade, is quietly spreading among unvaccinated people, health officials said Friday, Aug. 12, 2022. (Sarah Poser, Meredith Boyter Newlove/CDC via AP, File)

FILE - This 2014 illustration made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention depicts a polio virus particle. The polio virus has been found in New York City’s wastewater in another sign that the disease, which hadn’t been seen in the U.S. in a decade, is quietly spreading among unvaccinated people, health officials said Friday, Aug. 12, 2022. (Sarah Poser, Meredith Boyter Newlove/CDC via AP, File)

This 1964 microscope image made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows damage from the polio virus to human spinal cord tissue. On Thursday, July 21, 2022, New York health officials reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade. (Dr. Karp/Emory University/CDC via AP)

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NEW YORK (AP) — An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday.

Officials said the patient, who lives in Rockland County, had developed paralysis. The person developed symptoms a month ago and did not recently travel outside the country, county health officials said.

It appears the patient had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine — available in other countries, but not the U.S. — and spread it, officials said.

The person is no longer deemed contagious, but investigators are trying to figure out how the infection occurred and whether other people were exposed to the virus.

Most Americans are vaccinated against polio, but this should serve as a wake-up call to the unvaccinated, said Jennifer Nuzzo, a Brown University pandemic researcher.

“This isn’t normal. We don’t want to see this,” Nuzzo said. “If you’re vaccinated, it’s not something you need to worry about. But if you haven’t gotten your kids vaccinated, it’s really important that you make sure they’re up to date.”

Health officials scheduled vaccination clinics in New York for Friday and Monday, and encouraged anyone who has not been vaccinated to get the shots.

“We want shots in the arms of those who need it,” Rockland County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert said at a Thursday news conference.

Polio was once one of the nation’s most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis. The disease mostly affects children.

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread.

Rarely, travelers have brought polio infections into the U.S. The last such case was in 2013, when a 7-month-old who had recently moved to the U.S. from India was diagnosed in San Antonio, Texas, according the federal health officials. That child also had the type of polio found in the live form of vaccine used in other countries.

There are two types of polio vaccines. The U.S. and many other countries use shots made with an inactivated version of the virus. But some countries where polio has been more of a recent threat use a weakened live virus that is given to children as drops in the mouth. In rare instances, the weakened virus can mutate into a form capable of sparking new outbreaks.

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio with the inactivated vaccine. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age; 4 months; at 6 to 18 months; and at age 4 through 6 years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC’s most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93% of 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death.

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City’s northern suburbs, has been a center of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported.

Associated Press video journalist Shelby Lum contributed to this report.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

new york reports first polio case

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The first U.S. polio case was discovered in nearly a decade. Should you worry?

Dustin Jones

new york reports first polio case

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention scientist works with polio virus material. The first case of polio in nearly decade was detected in a New York patient Thursday. The individual was unvaccinated and likely contracted the virus from an individual outside of the country. James Gathany/CDC hide caption

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention scientist works with polio virus material. The first case of polio in nearly decade was detected in a New York patient Thursday. The individual was unvaccinated and likely contracted the virus from an individual outside of the country.

Health officials in New York have discovered a case of polio in an adult — the first case in the country since 2013 .

The good news is most people have nothing to worry about. "Unless you're unvaccinated," according to retired family physician and polio survivor Marny Eulberg.

The New York State Department of Health said the unvaccinated individual from Rockland County likely contracted the virus from someone outside of the country who had taken an oral polio vaccine, which hasn't been authorized for use in the U.S. since 2000.

The first U.S. case of polio since 2013 has been detected in New York

The first U.S. case of polio since 2013 has been detected in New York

Additional details about the patient have yet to be released, but Eulberg said this instance will likely be attributed to the oral vaccine, which contains weakened live strains of the virus.

Over time, this weaker strain of polio can mutate and behave more like a natural version of the virus and spread to unvaccinated people. This is defined as a vaccine-derived polio virus case. Had the individual in New York been vaccinated, Eulberg said, this wouldn't have happened.

The majority of people in the United States have been vaccinated against polio — nearly 93% of children have by the age of two, the CDC says — because many states children require a polio vaccine to attend school. However, some people are granted religious exemptions and a handful of states leave that decision to the parents, Eulberg notes.

How the U.S. case might tie into the global upswing in polio

Goats and Soda

Vaccine-derived polio is on the rise. a new vaccine aims to stop the spread.

"Polio is a viral infectious disease that a small percentage of cases attack the nerves in the spinal cord that tell the body what to do and then causes paralysis," she said.

Given the seriousness of the virus, New York's Rockland County is urging unvaccinated residents to get the vaccine and announced clinics to make it easy for local residents to do so.

Eulberg was infected with polio in 1950 when she was just 4 years old — five years before a vaccine was available in the United States. She was hospitalized for six months. She said her left leg was paralyzed and she required a leg brace and crutches to get around for a portion of her childhood.

Polio is found in the U.K. for the first time in nearly 40 years. Here's what it means

Polio is found in the U.K. for the first time in nearly 40 years. Here's what it means

By the time she was in high school she no longer needed the brace or crutches because the surviving nerves made up for the ones damaged by the virus. But 35 years later, her condition began to deteriorate.

About half of all polio survivors experience some level of paralysis later in life, she explained. Though there's no definitive answer as to why that happens, the leading theory is that the surviving nerves wear down over time.

"It's not polio coming back; we're not contagious," Eulberg said. "It's just something that happens to up to 50% of the people who had polio in the past and it happens 20 to 50 years later."

Polio has more or less been eradicated across the globe, but remains in impoverished countries that struggle with vaccination rates and clean water. Most cases remain in Afghanistan and Pakistan , according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention .

Rotary International and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation renewed their partnership in January by pledging up to $450 million to help eradicate the polio virus globally.

Editor's note: The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is among NPR's financial supporters.

A nurse fills a syringe with a vaccine before administering an injection at a kids clinic in Kiev

Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Mike Stobbe, Associated Press

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  • Copy URL https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/new-york-reports-1st-u-s-polio-case-in-nearly-a-decade

New York reports 1st U.S. polio case in nearly a decade

NEW YORK (AP) — An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday.

Officials said the patient, who lives in Rockland County, had developed paralysis. The person developed symptoms a month ago and did not recently travel outside the country, county health officials said.

It appears the patient had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine — available in other countries, but not the U.S. — and spread it, officials said.

The person is no longer deemed contagious, but investigators are trying to figure out how the infection occurred and whether other people may have been exposed to the virus.

Most Americans are vaccinated against polio, but unvaccinated people may be at risk, said Rockland County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert. Health officials scheduled vaccination clinics nearby for Friday and Monday, and encouraged anyone who has not been vaccinated to get the shots.

“We want shots in the arms of those who need it,” she said at a Thursday press conference announcing the case.

Polio was once one of the nation’s most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis — many of them in children.

READ MORE: Mozambique declares polio outbreak after identifying first wild case in 30 years

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread.

Rarely, travelers have brought polio infections into the U.S. The last such case was in 2013, when a 7-month-old who had recently moved to the U.S. from India was diagnosed in San Antonio, Texas, according the federal health officials. That child also had the type of polio found in the live form of vaccine used in other countries.

There are two types of polio vaccines. The U.S. and many other countries use shots made with an inactivated version of the virus. But some countries where polio has been more of a recent threat use a weakened live virus that is given to children as drops in the mouth. In rare instances, the weakened virus can mutate into a form capable of sparking new outbreaks.

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio with the inactivated vaccine. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age; 4 months; at 6 to 18 months; and at age 4 through 6 years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC’s most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93% of 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death. The disease mostly affects children.

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City’s northern suburbs, has been a center of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported.

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new york reports first polio case

What to know about the new rare polio case in New York

The inactivated version of the polio vaccine used in the US doesn't infect people.

By Jocelyn Solis-Moreira | Published Jul 22, 2022 10:49 AM EDT

Poliovirus particles in blue and green in a digital rendering

The US has detected its first case of polio in nearly a decade . On July 21, public health officials confirmed that an unvaccinated man in Rockland County, New York, had developed polio after using a banned version of the vaccine for the virus. Traces of a similar form of polio have recently been reported in other countries, such as the United Kingdom.

“We are monitoring the situation closely and working with the New York State Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to respond to this emergent public health issue to protect the health and wellbeing of residents,” Patricia Schnabel Ruppert, the Rockland County Health Commissioner, said in a press release .

The poliovirus is a highly contagious and deadly disease that has devastated humanity for centuries. No one knows when the first cases began. However, historians have found early evidence of polio-like symptoms in ancient Egypt , where hieroglyphics depict a man with a weak leg who cannot walk without a walking stick. It wasn’t until the late 19th century when the US saw polio outbreaks . 

[Related: From the archives: A polio vaccine was finally on the horizon ]

The virus can enter the body through the mouth from a number of sources, including contact with an infected person’s feces through contaminated food or water. While less common, droplets from the sneeze or cough of an infected person can also spread the virus. It mainly targets children below the age of five.

About 25 percent of people infected with polio will develop flu-like symptoms such as a sore throat, fever, stomach pain, and a headache for two to five days. Nearly 75 percent of people will have no visible symptoms. As it spreads through the body, the poliovirus can attack the brain and spinal cord, causing permanent damage. One in every 200 polio infections leads to paralysis , and about five to 10 percent of people paralyzed die because the muscles involved in breathing become immobilized as well.

By 1940, polio caused paralysis in nearly 20,000 people living in the US (including, famously,  President Franklin D. Roosevelt ). But in 1953, Jonas Salk discovered a polio vaccine that helped drop the US caseload to just 6,000 four years later. By 1979, the states were polio-free, although the disease can come back if someone is unvaccinated and exposed in a country with polio outbreaks or to a population that relies on the oral vaccine .

[Related: Researchers may finally know what’s causing the mysterious polio-like illness in kids ]

The recent polio case in New York, occurred in an unvaccinated young adult. While the person is no longer contagious, they have become paralyzed. Health officials believe the patient contracted the disease after taking an oral version of the vaccine that uses the live virus. Since 2000, the US has been using an inactivated injectable vaccine with a dead virus that trains the immune system to recognize and destroy the pathogen. However, some countries still use the live attenuated vaccine, which delivers a weak but viable polio virus to create a lasting immune response. With this treatment, there is a small risk of the virus mutating and infecting  others. “It mimics natural infection, and people shed the virus, the vaccine virus, and that spreads to other people, and then they get immunized that way,” Amesh A. Adalja, senior scholar at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, explained to the New York Times .

“If there are unvaccinated communities, it can cause a polio outbreak,” Walter Orenstein, a polio expert at Emory University, told Stat News . “The inactivated polio vaccine we have is very effective and very safe and could have prevented this.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends all children get vaccinated with four doses of the inactivated polio vaccine starting at two months of age. Unvaccinated adults can get a routine series of the polio vaccine with their family doctor as well. Adults that were immunized during childhood but are at an increased risk of polio exposure are eligible for a booster dose.

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New York reports first U.S. polio case in nearly a decade

Polio

An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday.

Officials said the patient, who lives in Rockland County, had developed paralysis. The person developed symptoms a month ago and did not recently travel outside the country, county health officials said.

It appears the patient had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine—available in other countries, but not the U.S.—and spread it, officials said.

The person is no longer deemed contagious, but investigators are trying to figure out how the infection occurred and whether other people may have been exposed to the virus.

Most Americans are vaccinated against polio, but unvaccinated people may be at risk, said Rockland County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert. Health officials scheduled vaccination clinics nearby for Friday and Monday, and encouraged anyone who has not been vaccinated to get the shots.

“We want shots in the arms of those who need it,” she said at a Thursday press conference announcing the case.

Polio was once one of the nation’s most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis—many of them in children.

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread.

Rarely, travelers have brought polio infections into the U.S. The last such case was in 2013, when a 7-month-old who had recently moved to the U.S. from India was diagnosed in San Antonio, Texas, according the federal health officials. That child also had the type of polio found in the live form of vaccine used in other countries.

There are  two types  of polio vaccines. The U.S. and many other countries use shots made with an inactivated version of the virus. But some countries where polio has been more of a recent threat use a weakened live virus that is given to children as drops in the mouth. In rare instances, the weakened virus can mutate into a form capable of sparking new outbreaks.

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio with the inactivated vaccine. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age; 4 months; at 6 to 18 months; and at age 4 through 6 years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC’s most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93% of 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death. The disease mostly affects children.

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City’s northern suburbs, has been a center of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported.

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Unvaccinated young adult in New York becomes first US polio case in nearly a decade

a microscope image showing damage to human spinal cord tissue from the polio virus

An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first US case in nearly a decade.

Key points:

  • Investigators are trying to figure out how the patient contracted the virus and whether others were exposed
  • The patient is from Rockland County, a northern suburb of New York City which has been a centre of vaccine resistance
  • The last US case of polio was detected in 2013

US health officials said the patient — who lives in Rockland County, New York state, just 56 kilometres from New York City — had developed paralysis.

The person developed symptoms a month ago and had not recently travelled outside the country, county health officials said.

It appears the patient had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who received live vaccine — available in other countries, but not the US — and spread it, officials said.

The person is no longer deemed contagious, but investigators are trying to figure out how the infection occurred and whether other people were exposed to the virus.

am illustration of a polio virus particle against a black background

Most Americans are vaccinated against polio, but this should serve as a wake-up call to the unvaccinated, Brown University pandemic researcher Jennifer Nuzzo said.

"This isn't normal. We don't want to see this," Dr Nuzzo said.

"If you're vaccinated, it's not something you need to worry about. But, if you haven't gotten your kids vaccinated, it's really important that you make sure they're up to date."

Health officials scheduled vaccination clinics in New York for Friday and Monday, and encouraged anyone who has not been vaccinated to get the shots.

"We want shots in the arms of those who need it," Rockland County Health Commissioner Dr Patricia Schnabel Ruppert said at a news conference.

Polio was once one of the the US' most-feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis.

The disease mostly affects children.

Vaccines became available, starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of US cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the US, meaning there was no longer routine spread.

Rarely, travellers have brought polio infections into the US.

The last such case was in 2013, when a 7-month-old who had recently moved to the US from India was diagnosed in San Antonio, Texas, according the federal health officials.

That child also had the type of polio found in the live form of vaccine that was used in other countries.

There are two types of polio vaccines.

The US and many other countries use shots made with an inactivated version of the virus.

However, some countries where polio has been more of a recent threat use a weakened live virus that is given to children as drops in the mouth.

A photo of boys receiving treatment for polio in Australia

In rare instances, the weakened virus can mutate into a form capable of sparking new outbreaks.

US children are still routinely vaccinated against polio with the inactivated vaccine.

Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age, 4 months, at 6 to 18 months, and at age 4 to 6 years.

Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC's most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93 per cent of US 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water.

It can infect a person's spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death.

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City's northern suburbs, has been a centre of vaccine resistance in recent years.

A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples.

No cases of paralysis were reported.

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July 21, 2022

New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

by MIKE STOBBE

New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday.

Officials said the patient, who lives in Rockland County, had developed paralysis. The person developed symptoms a month ago and did not recently travel outside the country, county health officials said.

It appears the patient had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine—available in other countries, but not the U.S.—and spread it, officials said.

The person is no longer deemed contagious, but investigators are trying to figure out how the infection occurred and whether other people were exposed to the virus.

Most Americans are vaccinated against polio, but this should serve as a wake-up call to the unvaccinated, said Jennifer Nuzzo, a Brown University pandemic researcher.

"This isn't normal. We don't want to see this," Nuzzo said. "If you're vaccinated, it's not something you need to worry about. But if you haven't gotten your kids vaccinated, it's really important that you make sure they're up to date."

Health officials scheduled vaccination clinics in New York for Friday and Monday, and encouraged anyone who has not been vaccinated to get the shots.

"We want shots in the arms of those who need it," Rockland County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert said at a Thursday news conference.

Polio was once one of the nation's most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis. The disease mostly affects children.

New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread.

Rarely, travelers have brought polio infections into the U.S. The last such case was in 2013, when a 7-month-old who had recently moved to the U.S. from India was diagnosed in San Antonio, Texas, according the federal health officials. That child also had the type of polio found in the live form of vaccine used in other countries.

There are two types of polio vaccines. The U.S. and many other countries use shots made with an inactivated version of the virus. But some countries where polio has been more of a recent threat use a weakened live virus that is given to children as drops in the mouth. In rare instances, the weakened virus can mutate into a form capable of sparking new outbreaks.

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio with the inactivated vaccine. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age; 4 months; at 6 to 18 months; and at age 4 through 6 years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC's most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93% of 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person's spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death.

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City's northern suburbs, has been a center of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported.

© 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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New york reports 1st u.s. polio case in nearly a decade.

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NEW YORK (AP) — An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday.

Officials said the patient, who lives in Rockland County, had developed paralysis. The person developed symptoms a month ago and did not recently travel outside the country, county health officials said.

It appears the patient had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine — available in other countries, but not the U.S. — and spread it, officials said.

The person is no longer deemed contagious, but investigators are trying to figure out how the infection occurred and whether other people may have been exposed to the virus.

Most Americans are vaccinated against polio, but unvaccinated people may be at risk, said Rockland County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert. Health officials scheduled vaccination clinics nearby for Friday and Monday, and encouraged anyone who has not been vaccinated to get the shots.

“We want shots in the arms of those who need it,” she said at a Thursday press conference announcing the case.

Polio was once one of the nation’s most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis — many of them in children.

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread.

Rarely, travelers have brought polio infections into the U.S. The last such case was in 2013, when a 7-month-old who had recently moved to the U.S. from India was diagnosed in San Antonio, Texas, according the federal health officials. That child also had the type of polio found in the live form of vaccine used in other countries.

There are two types of polio vaccines. The U.S. and many other countries use shots made with an inactivated version of the virus. But some countries where polio has been more of a recent threat use a weakened live virus that is given to children as drops in the mouth. In rare instances, the weakened virus can mutate into a form capable of sparking new outbreaks.

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio with the inactivated vaccine. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age; 4 months; at 6 to 18 months; and at age 4 through 6 years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC’s most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93% of 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death. The disease mostly affects children.

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City’s northern suburbs, has been a center of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported.

The Associated Press Health & Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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new york reports first polio case

New York Detects First U.S. Case of Polio in Nearly a Decade

The case was discovered in Rockland County, where a polio vaccination clinic will begin offering the shots on Friday.

New York Detects Polio Case

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - APRIL, 28: Nurse Lydia Fulton prepares to administer the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine as well as a vaccine used to help prevent the diseases of diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, and polio at Children's Primary Care Clinic in Minneapolis, MN, Friday April 28, 2017. (Photo by Courtney Perry/For the Washington Post)

Courtney Perry | For the Washington Post

A nurse prepares to administer the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine as well as a vaccine used to help prevent the diseases of diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, and polio at Children's Primary Care Clinic in Minneapolis, MN.

The first U.S. case of polio in nearly a decade was reported in New York on Thursday.

State officials did not provide details on the case like the patient’s identity or age. The officials said that it is possible the case originated outside of the U.S. because the strain of polio likely comes from an oral polio vaccine that is no longer used in the U.S.

"Based on what we know about this case, and polio in general, the Department of Health strongly recommends that unvaccinated individuals get vaccinated or boosted with the FDA-approved IPV polio vaccine as soon as possible," New York State Health Commissioner Mary Bassett said in a statement. “The polio vaccine is safe and effective, protecting against this potentially debilitating disease, and it has been part of the backbone of required, routine childhood immunizations recommended by health officials and public health agencies nationwide."

Cartoons on the Coronavirus

new york reports first polio case

"Many of you may be too young to remember polio, but when I was growing up, this disease struck fear in families, including my own," Rockland County Executive Ed Day said in a statement. "The fact that it is still around decades after the vaccine was created shows you just how relentless it is. Do the right thing for your child and the greater good of your community and have your child vaccinated now."

Polio was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 1979 following an aggressive and successful campaign to vaccinate children. The politicization of the coronavirus vaccine, on the other hand, has sparked concerns about whether similar campaigns to fight emerging diseases could succeed in the future. Eradicating the disease means “there is no year-round transmission of poliovirus in the United States,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Polio, which mostly affects children, caused more than 15,000 cases of paralysis each year in the early 1950s. After implementation of the polio vaccines, cases fell below 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s.

The CDC recommends children get four doses of polio vaccine: one at 2 months old, 4 months old, 6 through 18 months old and 4 through 6 years old. All 50 states mandate polio vaccines for K-12 enrollment.

Meanwhile, U.K. officials last month warned parents to get their children vaccinated after finding evidence of the virus that causes the disease in London sewage samples. Authorities said the overall risk to the public was “extremely low” and that no cases of paralysis had been reported.

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New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

NEW YORK (AP) — An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday.

Officials said the patient, who lives in Rockland County, had developed paralysis. The person developed symptoms a month ago and did not recently travel outside the country, county health officials said.

It appears the patient had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine — available in other countries, but not the U.S. — and spread it, officials said.

The person is no longer deemed contagious, but investigators are trying to figure out how the infection occurred and whether other people were exposed to the virus.

Most Americans are vaccinated against polio, but this should serve as a wake-up call to the unvaccinated, said Jennifer Nuzzo, a Brown University pandemic researcher.

“This isn’t normal. We don’t want to see this,” Nuzzo said. “If you’re vaccinated, it’s not something you need to worry about. But if you haven’t gotten your kids vaccinated, it’s really important that you make sure they’re up to date.”

Health officials scheduled vaccination clinics in New York for Friday and Monday, and encouraged anyone who has not been vaccinated to get the shots.

“We want shots in the arms of those who need it,” Rockland County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert said at a Thursday news conference.

Polio was once one of the nation’s most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis. The disease mostly affects children.

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread.

Rarely, travelers have brought polio infections into the U.S. The last such case was in 2013, when a 7-month-old who had recently moved to the U.S. from India was diagnosed in San Antonio, Texas, according the federal health officials. That child also had the type of polio found in the live form of vaccine used in other countries.

There are two types of polio vaccines. The U.S. and many other countries use shots made with an inactivated version of the virus. But some countries where polio has been more of a recent threat use a weakened live virus that is given to children as drops in the mouth. In rare instances, the weakened virus can mutate into a form capable of sparking new outbreaks.

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio with the inactivated vaccine. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age; 4 months; at 6 to 18 months; and at age 4 through 6 years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC’s most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93% of 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death.

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City’s northern suburbs, has been a center of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported.

Associated Press video journalist Shelby Lum contributed to this report.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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New York reports 1st U.S. polio case in close to a decade

Rockland county resident is an unvaccinated adult, no details on condition.

new york reports first polio case

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New York health officials on Thursday reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade.

Officials said the Rockland County resident is an unvaccinated adult, but they did not detail the person's condition.

It appears the person had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine — available in other countries, but not the U.S. — and spread it, officials said.

  • Q&A: Comparing COVID-19, polio and the vaccines
  • Apocalypse Then Like polio, the long-term impact of COVID will be measured in disability

Polio was once one of the nation's most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis — many of them in children.

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread. Rarely, travellers with polio have brought infections into the U.S., with the last such case in 2013.

new york reports first polio case

A history of polio in Canada

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at two months of age; four months; at six to 18 months; and at age four through six years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC's most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93 per cent of two-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person's spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death. The disease mostly affects children.

  • In the 1950s, Canada faced a terrifying epidemic. Here's how it was conquered
  • Audio 'People are talking about the same things they talked about back then': COVID stirs up memories of polio

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City's northern suburbs, has been a centre of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported. 

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New York Reports First Polio Case in a Decade—Here’s What You Need to Know

An unvaccinated man from New York recently contracted polio.

This is the first documented case of polio in the U.S. since 2013.

Polio is a viral illness that can cause neurological symptoms, such as paralysis.

Yesterday, a case of polio was identified in an unvaccinated adult man in Rockland County, New York.

The New York State Department of Health and its Rockland County counterpart confirmed that the infected person was unvaccinated, and contracted the virus from someone who traveled outside the U.S. and had received the oral polio vaccine, which is a live vaccine that has not been administered in the United States since 2000.

“It’s important to realize that this is not wild polio in NY—but vaccine-derived polio from an oral poliovirus vaccine,” says Amesh Adalja M.D. , infectious disease expert and senior scholar from Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. This means the virus was transmitted to a person vaccinated with the oral polio vaccine, and then reverted to the live virus and spread.

The World Health Organization aimed to eradicate the virus in the 1980s, thanks to vaccines, says William Schaffner, M.D. , Professor of Infectious Diseases at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. But there are still places in the world where polio still exists, particularly in Pakistan and Afghanistan—developing countries where there is political turmoil and a lack of vaccine access. Poliovirus is a dangerous virus that should be taken very seriously, but rest assured, there is essentially no risk of this virus for people who have been vaccinated.

Whether you’re unsure if you received the polio vaccine or simply want to know what polio is and how it spreads, we’re breaking down everything you need to know about polio.

What is polio?

According to the CDC , polio, or poliomyelitis, is a disabling and life-threatening disease caused by the poliovirus.

Dr. Schaffner explains that poliovirus “lives in the intestinal tract, and therefore it can spread readily from person to person. Every once in a while, this poliovirus leaves the intestinal tract, gets into the bloodstream, circulates throughout the body, but hones in on [motor] cells in our spinal cord, infects those cells, and destroys them. These motor cells control the movement of our muscles and send signals to our muscles to move. If they are destroyed, it results in paralysis, which can be life-threatening or leave people with a lifetime of disabilities.”

Dr. Adalja adds that “polio is a viral illness spread from person to person that, in most cases, causes no symptoms.” The virus can, however, impact the spinal cord and cause paralysis in about 0.1% of cases, which doesn’t seem likely, but that’s still enough to cause concern.

What are the symptoms of polio?

In unvaccinated people, “90% of polio cases are asymptomatic. 10% or so develop a mild viral illness with fever, malaise, etc. 1-5% may get an aseptic meningitis with headache, neck stiffness, etc. 0.1% can develop paralysis, usually of one limb. Thinking of a 1 out of 1000 risk of paralysis, you can imagine how common polio was in the early 1900s given how many stories you hear of polio paralysis,” says David J. Cennimo, M.D. , Associate Professor of Medicine & Pediatrics at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

According to the CDC , most people who get infected with poliovirus (about 72 out of 100) will not have any visible symptoms.

About 1 out of 4 people (or 25 out of 100) with poliovirus infection will have flu-like symptoms that may include:

Sore throat

Stomach pain

These symptoms usually last two to five days, then go away on their own.

A smaller portion of people (much less than 1 out of 100, or 1 to 5 out of 1000) with poliovirus infection will develop other, more serious symptoms and conditions that affect the brain and spinal cord:

Paresthesia (feeling of pins and needles in the legs)

Meningitis (infection of the covering of the spinal cord and/or brain) occurs in about 1 out of 25 people with poliovirus infection

Paralysis (can’t move parts of the body) or weakness in the arms, legs, or both, occurs in about 1 out of 200 people with poliovirus infection

How does polio spread?

As for how polio is transmitted, it “is a viral illness transmitted by the oral-fecal route that can cause neurological symptoms, such as paralysis”, says Richard Watkins, M.D. , an infectious disease physician and a professor of internal medicine at the Northeast Ohio Medical University. So, polio spreads from person to person via the fecal-oral route, explains Dr. Adalja. Fecal-oral transmission happens when an infected person’s contaminated feces enter the body of another person—which often occurs via hands that aren’t washed properly after using the bathroom and anything touched afterward. Eating foods that were washed or harvested from contaminated water can also spread disease in a similar manner.

Dr. Cennimo explains that “polio is an enterovirus [a group of viruses that cause a number of infectious illnesses] that has a particular affinity for neurons (neurotropims) that can lead to paralysis. Enteroviruses are common… and are frequently transmitted from fecal-oral contamination. Polio can be found in wastewater because, as an enterovirus, it is shed in feces.”

It’s important to remember that the vaccine-derived strain of polio can circulate among people who received the oral polio vaccine, so that itself is another way the virus can spread, according to Dr. Watkins.

Dr. Watkins recalls that “famously, President Franklin D. Roosevelt got polio after swimming.”

Is the polio vaccine still given?

The short answer: yes. There are two types of polio vaccines, an oral vaccine that contains live virus, and an injection that contains dead vaccine, according to Dr. Watkins.

According to the CDC , two doses of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) are 90% effective or more against polio; three doses are 99% to 100% effective. In a study that estimated the efficacy of the oral polio vaccine (OPV) still being used in Afghanistan, the most recent efficacy was shown to be about 96%.

Oral polio vaccine (OPV)

The oral vaccine is a tamed poliovirus, processed so that the virus is benign, which cannot cause paralysis but can signal our immune system, according to Dr. Schaffner. “If I’ve been given the vaccine, which has a live virus, it goes down in my colon, it’s still alive, and if I have close contact with you, I can transmit that vaccine virus to you, so you are getting protected also,” he explains. The problem is “rarely, one in about 3 million doses, this tamed virus can mutate and revert back to being a bad virus which can create polio paralytic disease.”

In the U.S. today, we use an inactivated polio vaccine as an injection, explains Dr. Cennimo, which mitigates the risk of spreading the live virus.

“Prior to 2000 in the U.S. and ongoing in parts of the world, polio was a live attenuated virus as an oral vaccine (drops on a sugar cube stories from your parents/grandparents). The vaccine virus can replicate and generates great immunity. However, it is also possible for the vaccinated person to shed virus for a period of time in stool (up to 8 weeks). In rare cases, the virus can become stronger and more virulent when shed and infect others who are susceptible. The risk of this is why the U.S. moved away from using oral polio vaccine in 2000.”

Injectable polio vaccine (IPV)

“This vaccine is highly effective and is not live. It is not capable of causing infection,” explains Dr. Schaffner. Dr. Watkins adds that “there is no way to get polio from the injectable vaccine. The oral vaccine hasn’t been used in the U.S. since around 2000, but it is still used in other countries. The CDC recommends that children get four doses of the polio vaccine. They should get one dose at each of the following ages: 2 months old, 4 months old, 6 through 18 months old, and 4 through 6 years old.”

Should I be worried about polio?

Not if you’re vaccinated. As long as you are vaccinated against polio, whether you received the injectable or oral vaccine as a child, you are protected.

What can you do to prevent polio?

“Vaccination is the best prevention measure for polio,” says Dr. Adalja.“Get the polio vaccine series,” says Dr. Cennimo. “Get vaccinated if you aren't,” says Dr. Watkins.

Get the idea?

The best way to protect yourself from the poliovirus is to get vaccinated if you aren’t already. If you are, then there really is no reason to panic. Another deadly virus resurfacing in the news is triggering for many of us, but as long as you’re vaccinated, you’re protected.

What to do if you think you have polio

If you have symptoms of polio, contact a healthcare provider. The healthcare provider will ask you about your symptoms and whether you have traveled recently.

Because polio symptoms look a lot like flu symptoms, the healthcare provider may order tests to rule out more common viral conditions.

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Public Health Response to a Case of Paralytic Poliomyelitis in an Unvaccinated Person and Detection of Poliovirus in Wastewater — New York, June–August 2022

Weekly / August 19, 2022 / 71(33);1065-1068

On August 16, 2022, this report was posted online as an MMWR Early Release.

Ruth Link-Gelles, PhD 1 ; Emily Lutterloh, MD 2 ,3 ; Patricia Schnabel Ruppert, DO 4 ; P. Bryon Backenson, MS 2 ,3 ; Kirsten St. George, PhD 5 ,6 ; Eli S. Rosenberg, PhD 2 ,3 ; Bridget J. Anderson, PhD 2 ; Meghan Fuschino, MS 5 ; Michael Popowich 5 ; Chitra Punjabi, MD 4 ; Maria Souto, MPH 4 ; Kevin McKay, MPH 4 ; Samuel Rulli 4 ; Tabassum Insaf, PhD 2 ; Dustin Hill, PhD 7 ; Jessica Kumar, DO 2 ; Irina Gelman, DPM 8 ; Jaume Jorba, PhD 1 ; Terry Fei Fan Ng, PhD 1 ; Nancy Gerloff, PhD 1 ; Nina B. Masters, PhD 1 ; Adriana Lopez, MHS 1 ; Kathleen Dooling, MD 1 ; Shannon Stokley, DrPH 1 ; Sarah Kidd, MD 1 ; M. Steven Oberste, PhD 1 ; Janell Routh, MD 1 ; 2022 U.S. Poliovirus Response Team ( View author affiliations )

What is already known about this topic?

Sustained poliovirus transmission has been eliminated from the United States for approximately 40 years; vaccines are highly effective in preventing paralysis after exposure.

What is added by this report?

In June 2022, poliovirus was confirmed in an unvaccinated immunocompetent adult resident of New York hospitalized with flaccid lower limb weakness. Vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 was isolated from the patient and identified from wastewater samples in two neighboring New York counties.

What are the implications for public health practice?

Unvaccinated persons in the United States remain at risk for paralytic poliomyelitis if they are exposed to either wild or vaccine-derived poliovirus; all persons in the United States should stay up to date on recommended poliovirus vaccination.

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On July 18, 2022, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) notified CDC of detection of poliovirus type 2 in stool specimens from an unvaccinated immunocompetent young adult from Rockland County, New York, who was experiencing acute flaccid weakness. The patient initially experienced fever, neck stiffness, gastrointestinal symptoms, and limb weakness. The patient was hospitalized with possible acute flaccid myelitis (AFM). Vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 (VDPV2) was detected in stool specimens obtained on days 11 and 12 after initial symptom onset. To date, related Sabin-like type 2 polioviruses have been detected in wastewater* in the patient’s county of residence and in neighboring Orange County up to 25 days before (from samples originally collected for SARS-CoV-2 wastewater monitoring) and 41 days after the patient’s symptom onset. The last U.S. case of polio caused by wild poliovirus occurred in 1979, and the World Health Organization Region of the Americas was declared polio-free in 1994. This report describes the second identification of community transmission of poliovirus in the United States since 1979; the previous instance, in 2005, was a type 1 VDPV ( 1 ). The occurrence of this case, combined with the identification of poliovirus in wastewater in neighboring Orange County, underscores the importance of maintaining high vaccination coverage to prevent paralytic polio in persons of all ages.

Case Findings

In June 2022, a young adult with a 5-day history of low-grade fever, neck stiffness, back and abdominal pain, constipation, and 2 days of bilateral lower extremity weakness visited an emergency department and was subsequently hospitalized with suspected AFM; the patient was unvaccinated against polio ( Figure ). As part of national AFM surveillance, † the suspected case was reported to NYSDOH and then to CDC. The patient was discharged to a rehabilitation facility 16 days after symptom onset with ongoing lower extremity flaccid weakness. A combined nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swab and cerebrospinal fluid sample were negative by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing for enteroviruses and human parechovirus, as well as for a panel of common respiratory pathogens and encephalitic viruses by molecular methods ( 2 ). RT-PCR and sequencing of a stool specimen by the NYSDOH laboratory identified poliovirus type 2. Specimens were tested at CDC using RT-PCR ( 3 ) and sequencing, confirming the presence of poliovirus type 2 in both stool specimens. Additional sequencing identified the virus as VDPV2 ( 4 ), differing from the Sabin 2 vaccine strain by 10 nucleotide changes in the region encoding the viral capsid protein, VP1, suggesting transmission for up to 1 year although the location of that transmission is unknown.

Based on the typical incubation period for paralytic polio, the presumed period of exposure occurred 7 to 21 days before the onset of paralysis. § Epidemiologic investigation revealed that the patient attended a large gathering 8 days before symptom onset and had not traveled internationally during the presumed exposure period. No other notable or known potential exposures were identified.

Public Health Response

Upon notification of the poliovirus-positive specimen, CDC, NYSDOH, and local health authorities launched an investigation and response on July 18, 2022. Activities included issuing a NYSDOH advisory on July 22 to increase health care provider awareness, ¶ enhancing surveillance for potentially infected persons, testing wastewater from Rockland and surrounding New York counties, assessing vaccination coverage in the patient’s community, supplying inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) to county immunization providers, and launching vaccination clinics throughout Rockland County.

Enhanced surveillance defined persons under investigation (PUIs) as those who met clinical criteria and who lived in or traveled to specific counties or neighborhoods in New York or had international travel since May 1, 2022.** As of August 10, three additional persons have been classified as PUIs; available specimens from the PUIs (i.e., stool, cerebrospinal fluid, serum, nasopharyngeal, or oropharyngeal swabs) yielded negative poliovirus test results.

As of August 10, a total of 260 wastewater samples from treatment plants in Rockland and Orange Counties, including samples originally collected for SARS-CoV-2 surveillance, were tested for poliovirus. Among these samples, 21 (8%) yielded positive poliovirus test results using RT-PCR and partial genome sequencing, including 13 from Rockland County and eight from Orange County. Twenty specimens from wastewater samples collected during May, June, and July were genetically linked to virus from the patient’s stool samples; one additional sample, from April in Orange County, was sequenced as poliovirus type 2, but the sequence was incomplete, precluding assessment of genetic linkage to the case. After these results, in August 2022, additional clinical and public health surveillance activities, including additional outreach to local providers and syndromic surveillance, were launched to identify the presence of symptomatic nonparalytic infection (characterized by mild symptoms [e.g., low-grade fever and sore throat] or more severe symptoms [e.g., aseptic meningitis]) †† and asymptomatic infection in the counties with poliovirus-positive wastewater findings.

According to the New York State Immunization Information System, 3-dose polio vaccination coverage among infants and children aged <24 months living in Rockland County was 67.0% in July 2020 and declined to 60.3% by August 2022, with zip code–specific coverage as low as 37.3%. §§ National coverage for IPV by age 24 months was 92.7% among infants born during 2017–2018 ( 5 ). The Rockland County Department of Health launched a countywide catch-up vaccination effort on July 22, 2022. Although there was a brief increase in administration of polio-containing vaccines (IPV alone and combination vaccines including IPV), the number of doses administered at temporary and established clinics was not sufficient to meaningfully increase population IPV coverage levels.

The findings in this report represent only the second community transmission of poliovirus identified in the United States since 1979 ( 1 ). At present, the origin of the VDPV2 detected in the patient’s stool and in sewage samples remains unknown. Because the patient had not traveled internationally during the potential exposure period, detection of VDPV2 in the patient’s stool samples indicates a chain of transmission within the United States originating with a person who received a type 2-containing oral polio vaccine (OPV) abroad; OPV was removed from the routine immunization schedule in the United States in 2000. Genome sequence comparisons have identified a link to vaccine-related type 2 polioviruses recently detected in wastewater in Israel and the United Kingdom. ¶¶ In general, approximately one in 1,900 poliovirus type 2 infections among unvaccinated persons is expected to result in paralysis ( 6 ). As of August 10, 2022, no additional poliomyelitis cases have been identified, although the detection of VDPV2 genetically linked to virus from the patient in wastewater specimens from two counties in New York State over the course of ≥2 months indicates community transmission and ongoing risk for paralysis to unvaccinated persons.

VDPVs can emerge when live, attenuated OPV is administered in a community with low vaccination coverage. Replication of OPV in a person who was recently vaccinated can result in viral reversion to neurovirulence, which can cause paralytic poliomyelitis in unvaccinated persons who are exposed to the vaccine-derived virus. Since removal of OPV from the routine U.S. immunization schedule in 2000, IPV has been the only polio vaccine used in the United States. An inactivated vaccine, IPV does not replicate, revert to VDPV, or cause vaccine-associated paralytic polio. Vaccination with 3 doses of IPV is >99% effective in preventing paralysis***; however, IPV does not prevent intestinal infection and therefore does not prevent poliovirus transmission.

Before this case, the last detection of poliovirus in a person in the United States was in 2013, in an immunocompromised infant who received OPV in India and then immigrated to the United States ( 1 ). VDPVs were identified in the United States in 2005 and 2008 in unvaccinated or immunodeficient persons who were in contact with a person who had recently received OPV; the 2008 case did not result in community transmission. Globally, type 2-containing vaccine (OPV2) has not been used in routine immunization since 2016, although monovalent OPV2 is used for specific vaccination campaigns to control circulating VDPV2 outbreaks ( 7 ).

Low vaccination coverage in the patient’s county of residence indicates that the community is at risk for additional cases of paralytic polio. Even a single case of paralytic polio represents a public health emergency in the United States. Vaccination plays a critical role in protecting persons from paralysis if they are exposed to poliovirus. During the COVID-19 pandemic, routine vaccination services were disrupted, leading to a decline in vaccine administration and coverage ( 8 , 9 ), including with IPV, and leaving many communities at risk for outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. Until poliovirus eradication is achieved worldwide, importations of both wild polioviruses and VDPVs into the United States are possible. This case highlights the risk for paralytic disease among unvaccinated persons; all persons in the United States should stay up to date on recommended IPV vaccination to prevent paralytic disease. †††

Acknowledgments

Breanna C. Keepers, Chloe Y. Li, Angela Lignelli-Dipple, Greer E. Waldrop, Columbia University Irving Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital; Quadrant Biosciences; New York State Wastewater Surveillance Network.

2022 U.S. Poliovirus Response Team

Hanen Belgasmi, CDC; Barrett Brister, CDC; James E. Bullows, CDC; Cara C. Burns, CDC; Christina J. Castro, CDC; Janine Cory, CDC; Naomi Dybdahl-Sissoko, CDC; Brian D. Emery, CDC; Randall English, CDC; Ann D. Frolov, CDC; Halle Getachew, CDC; Elizabeth Henderson, CDC; Alexandra Hess, CDC; Karen Mason, CDC; Jeffrey W. Mercante, CDC; Stacey Jeffries Miles, CDC; Hongmei Liu, CDC; Rachel L. Marine, CDC; Nehalraza Momin, CDC; Hong Pang, CDC; Daniel Perry, CDC; Shannon L. Rogers, CDC; Brandon Short, CDC; Hong Sun, CDC; Farrell Tobolowsky, CDC; Eileen Yee, CDC; Scott Hughes, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Enoma Omoregie, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Jennifer B. Rosen, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Jane R. Zucker, CDC and New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Mohammed Alazawi, New York State Department of Health; Ursula Bauer, New York State Department of Health; Alex Godinez, New York State Department of Health; Brianna Hanson, New York State Department of Health; Eugene Heslin, New York State Department of Health; James McDonald, New York State Department of Health; Neida K. Mita-Mendoza, New York State Department of Health; Megan Meldrum, New York State Department of Health; Dana Neigel, New York State Department of Health; Robin Suitor, New York State Department of Health; David A. Larsen, Syracuse University; Christina Egan, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Nicola Faraci, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; G. Stephanie Feumba, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Todd Gray, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Daryl Lamson, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Jennifer Laplante, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Kathleen McDonough, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Natalie Migliore, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Amruta Moghe, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Simon Ogbamikael, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Jonathan Plitnick, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Rama Ramani, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Lindsey Rickerman, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Erik Rist, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Lynsey Schoultz, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Matthew Shudt, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; Julie Krauchuk, Rockland County Department of Health, New York; Eric Medina, Rockland County Department of Health, New York; Jacqueline Lawler, Orange County Department of Health, New York; Heather Boss,, Orange County Department of Health, New York; Emanuele Barca, Columbia University Irving Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital; Danish Ghazali, Columbia University Irving Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital; Tarini Goyal, Columbia University Irving Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital; Sean J.P. Marinelli, Columbia University Irving Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital; Jackson A. Roberts, Columbia University Irving Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital; Grace B. Russo, Columbia University Irving Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital; Kiran T. Thakur, Columbia University Irving Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital; Vivian Q. Yang, Columbia University Irving Medical Center-New York Presbyterian Hospital.

Corresponding author: Ruth Link-Gelles, [email protected] .

1 2022 CDC Domestic Poliovirus Emergency Response Team; 2 New York State Department of Health; 3 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York; 4 Rockland County Department of Health, Pomona, New York; 5 Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health; 6 Department of Biomedical Science, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York; 7 Department of Public Health, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York; 8 Orange County Department of Health, Goshen, New York.

All authors have completed and submitted the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors form for disclosure of potential conflicts of interest.

* Wastewater, also referred to as sewage, includes water from household or building use (e.g., toilets, showers, and sinks) that can contain human fecal waste and water from non-household sources (e.g., rain and industrial use). https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/surveillance/wastewater-surveillance/wastewater-surveillance.html#how-wastewater-surveillance-works

† https://www.cdc.gov/acute-flaccid-myelitis/hcp/case-definitions.html

§ https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/polio.html

¶ https://health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/polio/docs/2022-07-29_han.pdf

** The full case definition included epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory criteria. Epidemiologic criteria included being a person who lived in or traveled to specific counties or neighborhoods in the state of New York or traveled internationally since May 1, 2022. Clinical criteria included 1) acute onset of flaccid paralysis of one or more limbs with decreased or absent tendon reflexes in the affected limbs, without other apparent cause, and without sensory or cognitive loss, or 2) meningitis, with either a positive enterovirus test result in any specimen or, if adequate testing for enteroviruses was not available, the absence of another apparent cause. Laboratory criteria included detection of wild or vaccine-derived poliovirus in a clinical specimen. PUIs were persons who met both epidemiologic and clinical criteria; confirmed cases of paralytic polio were defined as meeting both laboratory criteria and clinical criterion 1. Confirmed nonparalytic polio cases were defined as meeting laboratory criteria and clinical criterion 2, or meeting laboratory but not clinical criteria.

†† https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/polio.html

§§ https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/imz-managers/coverage/schoolvaxview/data-reports/index.html

¶¶ https://polioeradication.org/news-post/vaccine-derived-poliovirus-type-2-vdpv2-detected-in-environmental-samples-in-london-uk/

*** https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/polio.html

††† https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/polio/public/index.html

  • Alexander JP, Ehresmann K, Seward J, et al.; Vaccine-Derived Poliovirus Investigations Group. Transmission of imported vaccine-derived poliovirus in an undervaccinated community in Minnesota. J Infect Dis 2009;199:391–7. https://doi.org/10.1086/596052 PMID:19090774
  • Nix WA, Oberste MS, Pallansch MA. Sensitive, seminested PCR amplification of VP1 sequences for direct identification of all enterovirus serotypes from original clinical specimens. J Clin Microbiol 2006;44:2698–704. https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00542-06 PMID:16891480
  • Sun H, Harrington C, Gerloff N, et al. Validation of a redesigned pan-poliovirus assay and real-time PCR platforms for the global poliovirus laboratory network. PLoS One 2021;16:e0255795. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0255795 PMID:34358268
  • Burns CC, Kilpatrick DR, Iber JC, et al. Molecular properties of poliovirus isolates: nucleotide sequence analysis, typing by PCR and real-time RT-PCR. In: Martín J, ed. Poliovirus: methods and protocols, methods in molecular biology, vol. 1387. New York, NY: Humana Press; 2016:177–212.
  • Hill HA, Yankey D, Elam-Evans LD, Singleton JA, Sterrett N. Vaccination coverage by age 24 months among children born in 2017 and 2018—National Immunization Survey-Child, United States, 2018–2020. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2021;70:1435–40. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm7041a1 PMID:34648486
  • Nathanson N, Kew OM. From emergence to eradication: the epidemiology of poliomyelitis deconstructed. Am J Epidemiol 2010;172:1213–29. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwq320 PMID:20978089
  • Ramirez Gonzalez A, Farrell M, Menning L, et al. Implementing the synchronized global switch from trivalent to bivalent oral polio vaccines—lessons learned from the global perspective. J Infect Dis 2017;216(suppl_1):S183–92. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiw626 PMID:28838179
  • DeSilva MB, Haapala J, Vazquez-Benitez G, et al. Association of the COVID-19 pandemic with routine childhood vaccination rates and proportion up to date with vaccinations across 8 US health systems in the Vaccine Safety Datalink. JAMA Pediatr 2022;176:68–77. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2021.4251 PMID:34617975
  • Seither R, Laury J, Mugerwa-Kasujja A, Knighton CL, Black CL. Vaccination coverage with selected vaccines and exemption rates among children in kindergarten—United States, 2020–21 school year. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2022;71:561–8. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm7116a1 PMID:35446828

FIGURE . Timeline of patient activities, potential poliovirus exposures, shedding, and poliovirus-positive wastewater* samples† genetically linked to a patient with a case of type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus — New York, May–August 2022

Abbreviations: ED = emergency department; VDPV2 = type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus.

* Wastewater, also referred to as sewage, includes water from household or building use (e.g., toilets, showers, and sinks) that can contain human fecal waste and water from non-household sources (e.g., rain and industrial use).

† More than one positive wastewater sample might have been collected on the same day in Rockland County or Orange County.

Suggested citation for this article: Link-Gelles R, Lutterloh E, Schnabel Ruppert P, et al. Public Health Response to a Case of Paralytic Poliomyelitis in an Unvaccinated Person and Detection of Poliovirus in Wastewater — New York, June–August 2022. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2022;71:1065-1068. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm7133e2 .

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New York reports first US polio case in nearly a decade

(Photo by National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis/PhotoQuest/Getty Images)

(Photo by National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis/PhotoQuest/Getty Images)

NEW YORK - New York health officials on Thursday reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade.

Officials said the Rockland County resident is an unvaccinated adult, but they did not detail the person's condition.

It appears the person had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine — available in other countries, but not the U.S. — and spread it, officials said.

Polio was once one of the nation's most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis — many of them in children.

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

RELATED: Florida reports first human case of dengue of 2022, issues mosquito-born illness advisory

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread. Rarely, travelers with polio have brought infections into the U.S., with the last such case in 2013.

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age; 4 months; at 6 to 18 months; and at age 4 through 6 years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC's most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93% of 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death. The disease mostly affects children.

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Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City's northern suburbs, has been a center of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported.

Watch CBS News

Read the full decision in Trump's New York civil fraud case

By Graham Kates

Edited By Stefan Becket, Paula Cohen

Updated on: February 16, 2024 / 8:27 PM EST / CBS News

The judge overseeing the civil fraud case in New York against former President Donald Trump and the Trump Organization has issued his long-awaited ruling , five weeks after the  trial in the case concluded . 

Judge Arthur Engoron ordered Trump and his company to pay $354 million in fines — a total that jumps to $453.5 million when pre-judgment interest is factored in. It also bars them from seeking loans from financial institutions in New York for a period of three years, and includes a three-year ban on Trump serving as an officer or director of any New York corporation. 

Additional penalties were ordered for Trump's sons, Eric and Donald Trump Jr., who are executives at the company, and two former executives, Allen Weisselberg and Jeffrey McConney.

New York Attorney General Letitia James  brought the civil suit  in 2022, seeking a  penalty that grew to $370 million  and asking the judge to bar Trump from doing business in the state. 

Judge Engoron had already ruled in September that Trump and the other defendants were  liable for fraud , based on the evidence presented through pretrial filings. 

The judge had largely affirmed James' allegations that Trump and others at his company had inflated valuations of his properties by hundreds of millions of dollars over a the course of a decade and misrepresented his wealth by billions in a scheme, the state said, intended to trick banks and insurers into offering more favorable deal terms.

Trump and his legal team long expected a defeat, with the former president decrying the case as "rigged" and a "sham" and his lawyers laying the groundwork for an appeal before the decision was even issued. He is expected to appeal.

Read Judge Engoron's decision here :

  • The Trump Organization
  • Donald Trump
  • Letitia James

Graham Kates is an investigative reporter covering criminal justice, privacy issues and information security for CBS News Digital. Contact Graham at [email protected] or [email protected]

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New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

This 1964 microscope image made available by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows damage from the polio virus to human spinal cord tissue.

NEW YORK (AP) — An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday.

Officials said the patient, who lives in Rockland County, had developed paralysis. The person developed symptoms a month ago and did not recently travel outside the country, county health officials said.

It appears the patient had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine — available in other countries, but not the U.S. — and spread it, officials said.

The person is no longer deemed contagious, but investigators are trying to figure out how the infection occurred and whether other people were exposed to the virus.

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Most Americans are vaccinated against polio, but this should serve as a wake-up call to the unvaccinated, said Jennifer Nuzzo, a Brown University pandemic researcher.

“This isn’t normal. We don’t want to see this," Nuzzo said. "If you’re vaccinated, it’s not something you need to worry about. But if you haven’t gotten your kids vaccinated, it’s really important that you make sure they’re up to date.”

Health officials scheduled vaccination clinics in New York for Friday and Monday, and encouraged anyone who has not been vaccinated to get the shots.

“We want shots in the arms of those who need it,” Rockland County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert said at a Thursday news conference.

Polio was once one of the nation's most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis. The disease mostly affects children.

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread.

Rarely, travelers have brought polio infections into the U.S. The last such case was in 2013, when a 7-month-old who had recently moved to the U.S. from India was diagnosed in San Antonio, Texas, according the federal health officials. That child also had the type of polio found in the live form of vaccine used in other countries.

There are two types of polio vaccines. The U.S. and many other countries use shots made with an inactivated version of the virus. But some countries where polio has been more of a recent threat use a weakened live virus that is given to children as drops in the mouth. In rare instances, the weakened virus can mutate into a form capable of sparking new outbreaks.

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio with the inactivated vaccine. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age; 4 months; at 6 to 18 months; and at age 4 through 6 years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC's most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93% of 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death.

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City's northern suburbs, has been a center of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported.

Associated Press video journalist Shelby Lum contributed to this report.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Rep. Elise Stefanik files complaint against New York attorney general over Trump case

politics political politician legal

WASHINGTON — House Republican Conference Chair Elise Stefanik has filed a complaint against New York Attorney General Letitia James over her multimillion-dollar civil fraud case against former President Donald Trump, NBC News has exclusively learned.

Stefanik, R-N.Y., alleges that James is "conducting a biased investigation and prosecution" of Trump and "attacking" him through "extrajudicial statements," her letter to the New York Committee on Professional Standards says.

She also argues that James made "highly inappropriate and prejudicial comments on social media" and asks that the Attorney Grievance Committee investigate James and issue consequences, such as disbarring or suspending her.

Stefanik, a staunch ally of Trump's who is seen as a potential running mate , has filed multiple ethics complaints against judges associated with cases against Trump or the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. In November, she filed an ethics complaint against state Judge Arthur Engoron , who is presiding over the New York civil fraud case against Trump, and the following month she filed a complaint against U.S. District Judge  Beryl Howell , based in Washington, D.C., who has overseen Jan. 6-related cases.

"While all Americans possess the right to express their opinions on matters of public interest, attorneys — particularly state attorneys general — are held to a higher standard due to their unique role as officers of the court," Stefanik said in a statement.

The former president has previously claimed that James "hates" him and doesn't want him "to get elected."

James this year called for a $370 million fine against Trump and his companies, as well as a lifetime ban on him and two former company executives from the New York real estate industry. Trump has denied any wrongdoing. A verdict in the case is expected sometime this month.

The state attorney general's office has argued that Trump and his company falsely inflated statements to financially benefit themselves with better bank loans and insurance policies. James alleged that Trump overstated his net worth by as much as $2.2 billion one year.

Trump has repeatedly launched criticisms against James, at times calling her "rogue," "corrupt" and "out of control." Engoron imposed a gag order on Trump last year after he disparaged a law clerk on social media; he called the attack "unacceptable" and "inappropriate." An appeals court temporarily blocked the gag order.

Trump faces a slew of legal woes , including charges related to allegations he tried to overturn the results of the 2020 election, his handling of classified documents and allegations of falsifying business records related to hush money payments to an adult film star in 2016.

new york reports first polio case

Megan Lebowitz is a politics reporter for NBC News.

Health | New York reports first U.S. polio case in…

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Health | New York reports first U.S. polio case in nearly a decade

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the u.s., meaning there was no longer routine spread.

This 2014 illustration made available by ...

NEW YORK — An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday.

Officials said the patient, who lives in Rockland County, had developed paralysis. The person developed symptoms a month ago and did not recently travel outside the country, county health officials said.

It appears the patient had a vaccine-derived strain of the virus, perhaps from someone who got live vaccine — available in other countries, but not the U.S. — and spread it, officials said.

The person is no longer deemed contagious, but investigators are trying to figure out how the infection occurred and whether other people were exposed to the virus.

Most Americans are vaccinated against polio, but this should serve as a wake-up call to the unvaccinated, said Jennifer Nuzzo, a Brown University pandemic researcher.

“This isn’t normal. We don’t want to see this,” Nuzzo said. “If you’re vaccinated, it’s not something you need to worry about. But if you haven’t gotten your kids vaccinated, it’s really important that you make sure they’re up to date.”

Health officials scheduled vaccination clinics in New York for Friday and Monday, and encouraged anyone who has not been vaccinated to get the shots.

“We want shots in the arms of those who need it,” Rockland County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert said at a Thursday news conference.

Polio was once one of the nation’s most feared diseases, with annual outbreaks causing thousands of cases of paralysis. The disease mostly affects children.

Vaccines became available starting in 1955, and a national vaccination campaign cut the annual number of U.S. cases to less than 100 in the 1960s and fewer than 10 in the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In 1979, polio was declared eliminated in the U.S., meaning there was no longer routine spread.

Rarely, travelers have brought polio infections into the U.S. The last such case was in 2013, when a 7-month-old who had recently moved to the U.S. from India was diagnosed in San Antonio, Texas, according the federal health officials. That child also had the type of polio found in the live form of vaccine used in other countries.

There are two types of polio vaccines. The U.S. and many other countries use shots made with an inactivated version of the virus. But some countries where polio has been more of a recent threat use a weakened live virus that is given to children as drops in the mouth. In rare instances, the weakened virus can mutate into a form capable of sparking new outbreaks.

U.S. children are still routinely vaccinated against polio with the inactivated vaccine. Federal officials recommend four doses: to be given at 2 months of age; 4 months; at 6 to 18 months; and at age 4 through 6 years. Some states require only three doses.

According to the CDC’s most recent childhood vaccination data, about 93% of 2-year-olds had received at least three doses of polio vaccine.

Polio spreads mostly from person to person or through contaminated water. It can infect a person’s spinal cord, causing paralysis and possibly permanent disability and death.

Polio is endemic in Afghanistan and Pakistan, although numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and Asia have also reported cases in recent years.

Rockland County, in New York City’s northern suburbs, has been a center of vaccine resistance in recent years. A 2018-2019 measles outbreak there infected 312 people.

Last month, health officials in Britain warned parents to make sure children have been vaccinated because the polio virus had been found in London sewage samples. No cases of paralysis were reported.

Associated Press video journalist Shelby Lum contributed to this report.

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Trump Fraud Trial Penalty Will Exceed $450 Million

The ruling in Donald J. Trump’s civil fraud case could cost him all his available cash. The judge said that the former president’s “complete lack of contrition” bordered on pathological.

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Donald Trump, wearing a blue suit and blue tie, sits at the defendant’s table in a courtroom.

By Jonah E. Bromwich and Ben Protess

A New York judge on Friday handed Donald J. Trump a crushing defeat in his civil fraud case , finding the former president liable for conspiring to manipulate his net worth and ordering him to pay a penalty of nearly $355 million plus interest that could wipe out his entire stockpile of cash .

The decision by Justice Arthur F. Engoron caps a chaotic, yearslong case in which New York’s attorney general put Mr. Trump’s fantastical claims of wealth on trial. With no jury, the power was in Justice Engoron’s hands alone, and he came down hard: The judge delivered a sweeping array of punishments that threatens the former president’s business empire as he simultaneously contends with four criminal prosecutions and seeks to regain the White House.

Justice Engoron barred Mr. Trump for three years from serving in top roles at any New York company, including portions of his own Trump Organization. He also imposed a two-year ban on the former president’s adult sons and ordered that they pay more than $4 million each. One of them, Eric Trump, is the company’s de facto chief executive, and the ruling throws into doubt whether any member of the family can run the business in the near term.

The judge also ordered that they pay substantial interest, pushing the penalty for the former president to $450 million, according to the attorney general, Letitia James.

In his unconventional style, Justice Engoron criticized Mr. Trump and the other defendants for refusing to admit wrongdoing for years. “Their complete lack of contrition and remorse borders on pathological,” he said.

He noted that Mr. Trump had not committed violent crimes and also conceded that “Donald Trump is not Bernard Madoff.” Still, he wrote, “defendants are incapable of admitting the error of their ways.”

new york reports first polio case

The Civil Fraud Ruling on Donald Trump, Annotated

Former President Donald J. Trump was penalized $355 million plus interest and banned for three years from serving in any top roles at a New York company, including his own, in a ruling on Friday by Justice Arthur F. Engoron.

Mr. Trump will appeal the financial penalty but will have to either come up with the money or secure a bond within 30 days. The ruling will not render him bankrupt, because most of his wealth is in real estate, which altogether is worth far more than the penalty.

Mr. Trump will also ask an appeals court to halt the restrictions on him and his sons from running the company while it considers the case. In a news conference from his Palm Beach, Fla., home, Mar-a-Lago, on Friday evening, he attacked Ms. James and Justice Engoron, calling them both “corrupt.”

Alina Habba, one of Mr. Trump’s lawyers, described the ruling in her own statement as “a manifest injustice — plain and simple.” She added that “given the grave stakes, we trust that the Appellate Division will overturn this egregious verdict.”

But there might be little Mr. Trump can do to thwart one of the judge’s most consequential punishments: extending for three years the appointment of an independent monitor who is the court’s eyes and ears at the Trump Organization. Justice Engoron also strengthened the monitor’s authority to watch for fraud and second-guess transactions that look suspicious.

Mr. Trump’s lawyers have railed against the monitor, Barbara Jones, saying that her work had already cost the business more than $2.5 million; the decision to extend her oversight of the privately held company could enrage the Trumps, who see her presence as an irritant and an insult.

Ms. James had sought an even harsher penalty, asking for Mr. Trump to be permanently barred from New York’s business world. In the 2022 lawsuit that precipitated the trial, she accused Mr. Trump of inflating his net worth to obtain favorable treatment from banks and other lenders, attacking the foundation of his public persona as a billionaire businessman.

Even though the lenders made money from Mr. Trump, they were the purported victims in the case, with Ms. James arguing that without his fraud, they could have made even more.

The financial penalty reflects those lost profits, with nearly half of the $355 million — $168 million — representing the interest that Mr. Trump saved, and the remaining sum representing his profit on the recent sale of two properties, money that the judge has now clawed back from Mr. Trump and corporate entities he owns.

Before the trial began, Justice Engoron ruled that the former president had used his annual financial statements to defraud the lenders, siding with the attorney general on her case’s central claim. The judge’s Friday ruling ratified almost all of the other accusations Ms. James had leveled against Mr. Trump, finding that the former president had conspired with his top executives to violate several state laws.

The judge’s decision for now grants Ms. James, a Democrat, a career-defining victory. She campaigned for office promising to bring Mr. Trump to justice, and sat calmly in the courtroom as the former president attacked her, calling her a corrupt politician motivated solely by self-interest.

“This long running fraud was intentional, egregious, illegal,” Ms. James said during a Friday evening news conference, adding that “there cannot be different rules for different people in this country, and former presidents are no exception.”

New York Attorney General Speaks on Trump Fraud Case Decision

“today we are holding donald trump accountable,” said the attorney general, letitia james, after a new york judge found donald j. trump’s claims of wealth fraudulent..

No matter how rich, powerful or politically connected you are, everyone must play by the same rules. We have a responsibility to protect the integrity of the marketplace. And for years, Donald Trump engaged in deceptive business practices and tremendous fraud. Donald Trump falsely, knowingly, inflated his net worth by billions of dollars to unjustly enrich himself, his family, and to cheat the system. After 11 weeks of trial, we showed the staggering extent of his fraud and exactly how Donald Trump and the other defendants deceived banks, insurance companies and other financial institutions for their own personal gain. We prove just how much Donald Trump, his family and his company unjustly benefited from his fraud. White-collar financial fraud is not a victimless crime. When the powerful break the law and take more than their fair share, there are fewer resources available for working people, small businesses and families. Today we are holding Donald Trump accountable.

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Her win is Mr. Trump’s second major courtroom loss in two months, following a January jury verdict in a defamation case brought by E. Jean Carroll, a writer whom he was found liable of sexually abusing. The jury penalized him $83.3 million.

Friday’s ruling comes as Manhattan prosecutors are set to try Mr. Trump on criminal charges late next month . He is also contending with 57 more felony counts across three other criminal cases.

But none of his legal troubles seem to have anguished Mr. Trump quite like the fraud case. During the trial, he protested its premise, pleading, “This has been a persecution of somebody that’s done a good job in New York.”

Mr. Trump’s lawyers argued that the fraud did not have a victim in the traditional sense , daring the attorney general to find someone who was harmed. And in a statement on Friday, a Trump Organization spokeswoman noted that the company had “never missed any loan payment or been in default on any loan” and that the lenders “performed extensive due diligence prior to entering into these transactions.”

At trial, Mr. Trump’s lawyers called as witnesses the president’s former bankers, who testified that they had been delighted to have Mr. Trump as a client.

Eric Trump and his brother Donald Trump Jr. also testified, but their efforts to distance themselves from their father’s financial statements fell flat with the judge. Justice Engoron’s decision to bar them from running any New York business for two years — and Mr. Trump for three — will likely strike a nerve with the Trump family.

Before the trial, the fallout from the case seemed to threaten the Trump Organization’s very existence. When Justice Engoron first ruled that Mr. Trump had committed fraud, he ordered the dissolution of much of the former president’s New York empire.

But legal experts had questioned the judge’s ability to do that , and in his ruling on Friday, Justice Engoron pulled back. Instead, the judge said any “restructuring and potential dissolution” would be up to Ms. Jones, the independent monitor.

The judge also granted Ms. Jones new authority as part of an “enhanced monitorship,” and asked her to recommend an independent compliance director who will oversee the company’s financial reporting from within its ranks.

The monitorship and other penalties, including a three-year ban on Mr. Trump and his company seeking loans from banks registered in New York, could hamstring the company as it seeks to compete in the state’s crowded real estate market.

However, nothing will hurt quite as much as the financial penalty. If upheld on appeal, it could erase the cushion of liquidity — cash, stocks and bonds — that Mr. Trump built in his post-presidential life.

Mr. Trump claimed under oath last year that he was sitting on more than $400 million in cash, but between Justice Engoron’s $355 million punishment, the interest Mr. Trump owes and the $83.3 million payout to Ms. Carroll, that might all be gone. If so, Mr. Trump might have to sell one of his properties or another asset to cover the payouts.

The symbolism of the punishments cannot be overlooked, either. Mr. Trump is synonymous with the company he ran for decades, and by severing him from its operations, the judge has written an embarrassing epilogue to the former president’s story of his career as a New York mogul.

For now, Mr. Trump has spun his legal misfortunes into what he sees as political gold. He has used the cases to falsely portray himself as a victim of a Democratic cabal led by President Biden, and he has campaigned at every courthouse he has visited.

In Justice Engoron’s courtroom, Mr. Trump delivered a rally-made rant from the witness stand, marking the climax of a monthslong proceeding that was alternately stultifying and scintillating. The former president attacked one of Ms. James’s lawyers, saying: “You and about every other Democrat, district attorney, A.G. and U.S. attorney were coming after me from 15 different sides. All Democrats, all Trump haters.”

He did not spare Ms. James herself, or the judge, calling the attorney general a “political hack” and Justice Engoron an “extremely hostile judge.”

Mr. Trump later delivered his own closing statement, calling Ms. James’s fraud accusation a “fraud on me” and saying that the attorney general was the one who “should pay me.”

He generated drama even when not in the spotlight, rolling his eyes at the defense table and muttering to his lawyers. He was particularly enraged by the testimony of his former fixer, Michael D. Cohen , who linked Mr. Trump directly to the fraud scheme.

Mr. Trump’s lawyers succeeded in rattling Mr. Cohen, and asked, based on apparent contradictions in his testimony, that Justice Engoron throw out the case. When the judge declined, Mr. Trump abruptly stood up and stormed out of the courtroom.

The judge largely tolerated Mr. Trump’s behavior, but early on, he barred the former president from attacking his staff members, most prominently his law clerk, who sat near the judge throughout the trial so they could confer. Mr. Trump twice violated that order, prompting $15,000 in fines from the judge.

Courtroom theatrics notwithstanding, the evidence presented was often tedious, consisting of years-old emails and spreadsheets. Through that documentary evidence, Ms. James’s lawyers showed that Mr. Trump’s company had ignored appraisals and manipulated numbers to inflate the value of properties such as golf clubs and office buildings, sometimes to absurd heights.

The most blatant exaggeration was the listed size of Mr. Trump’s triplex apartment in Trump Tower on Fifth Avenue. For years, the former president had valued it as if it were 30,000 square feet, when it was actually 10,996.

In his ruling, Justice Engoron blasted Mr. Trump and the other defendants, saying that misstating the apartment’s size was the only error to which they would admit.

Justice Engoron wrote that he was not looking to “judge morality” — only to find facts and apply the law.

“The court intends to protect the integrity of the financial marketplace and, thus, the public as a whole,” he wrote.

Justice Engoron added that Mr. Trump’s refusal to admit error left him with no choice but to conclude that the former president would continue to commit fraud unless he was stopped.

William K. Rashbaum , Claire Fahy and Maggie Haberman contributed reporting.

Jonah E. Bromwich covers criminal justice in New York, with a focus on the Manhattan district attorney's office, state criminal courts in Manhattan and New York City's jails. More about Jonah E. Bromwich

Ben Protess is an investigative reporter at The Times, writing about public corruption. He has been covering the various criminal investigations into former President Trump and his allies. More about Ben Protess

  • International

Hearings on Trump's criminal cases in New York and Georgia

By Kara Scannell , Lauren del Valle , Jeremy Herb , Zachary Cohen , Jason Morris, Nick Valencia , Kristina Sgueglia, Dan Berman , Tori B. Powell and Matt Meyer , CNN

Here are key takeaways from Fani Willis' stunning testimony

From CNN's Marshall Cohen, Devan Cole, Holmes Lybrand and Katelyn Polantz

The Georgia election subversion case against  Donald Trump and 14 of his allies took a stunning turn Thursday when two top prosecutors testified under oath about their romantic relationship at a hearing triggered by allegations of self-dealing that have the potential to derail the entire effort.

The all-day hearing escalated steadily throughout the day, culminating with Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis taking the witness stand for a combative brawl with defense attorneys that drew several rebukes from the judge.

These are key takeaways:

  • Willis' defiant afternoon: Things quickly went off the rails. Willis didn’t act much like a traditional witness on the stand and was more like a prosecutor, arguing with the defense attorneys, raising objections, making legal arguments and even having exchanges with Judge Scott McAfee . She even raised her voice at one point. This led to a few rebukes from McAfee. Willis repeatedly accused some of the defense attorneys of peddling lies – before and after the judge’s admonishment.
  • Willis says she's not on trial: Willis seized several opportunities to defend herself. “You think I’m on trial,” Willis said, in her sharpest pushback of the day. “These people are on trial for trying to steal an election in 2020,” she added, pointing toward the table of attorneys representing defendants in the criminal case. “I’m not on trial, no matter how hard you try to put me on trial.” She later slammed the defense attorneys, calling them “confused” and “intrusive.”
  • When did the relationship start? On the stand, prosecutor Nathan Wade stuck to his earlier claim – in a sworn affidavit submitted to the court – that his romantic relationship with Willis began in early 2022 and that they split travel and vacation expenses. But Robin Bryant-Yeartie, a former friend of Willis and Fulton County employee, contradicted that claim , testifying that she had “no doubt” that the Willis-Wade affair began in late 2019. Notably, that would be before Willis hired Wade to lead the Trump probe in late 2021.
  • Wade and Willis describe using cash for reimbursements: Wade and Willis have offered a simple explanation for why there’s essentially no paper trail to back up his claims they split expenses: Willis used cash .
  • When did the relationship end? There was also a dispute over when the relationship ended, and whether it had any impact on the decision to seek the massive RICO indictment against Trump and others last August. Both said the relationship ended in summer 2023. Willis implied that the physical component ended earlier in the summer, but that the two had a “tough conversation” that fully ended things afterward.
  • Huge distraction from Trump's charges: Nothing that happened Thursday undercut the factual allegations against Trump, Rudy Giuliani, Mark Meadows, or the other GOP allies who are accused of trying to overturn the 2020 election. But the hearing shifted the conversation away from those allegation and away from Trump’s legal woes for now.

Trump reacts to Willis' testimony in Georgia

From CNN's Kate Sullivan

Former President Donald Trump on Thursday reacted to c and her lead prosecutor on the 2020 election case, Nathan Wade.

“FANI NEVER PAID CASH. SHE GOT FREE TRIPS AND OTHER THINGS FROM HER LOVER, WITH THE EXORBITANT AMOUNTS OF MONEY SHE AUTHORIZED TO BE PAID TO HIM. A GIANT SCAM. WITCH HUNT!!!”  Trump posted  on Truth Social. 

Wade and Willis pushed back against allegations from the defense that Willis was essentially getting kickbacks from Wade in the form of vacations. They said they split expenses and that Willis reimbursed Wade in cash for certain things.

Georgia judge says no ruling will be issued tomorrow in case over whether to dismiss Willis

From CNN’s Holmes Lybrand

Fulton County Superior Judge Scott McAfee looks on during a hearing at the Fulton County Courthouse on Thursday, February 15, in Atlanta, Georgia.

Fulton County Judge Scott McAfee said he would not issue any rulings Friday after the evidentiary hearing on efforts to disqualify District Attorney Fani Willis from the Georgia election subversion case. 

“I’m not ruling on any of this tomorrow,” McAfee said in closing the hearing Thursday. “This is something that’s going to be taken under advisement on all aspects.”  

McAfee also raised the possibility of scheduling final arguments from the parties at a later date. 

“My goal, my hope is perhaps we can just close the evidence tomorrow, and we can take it from there,” McAfee said.

Willis woke up "ready to testify," bishop who prayed with her before court says

From CNN's Nick Valencia and Devon Sayers

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis woke up Thursday morning "ready to testify," according to the African Methodist Episcopal bishop who says he prayed with her before today’s hearing.

Bishop Reginald Jackson told CNN he met with Willis earlier this morning before court began to "offer her words of encouragement," and they prayed together.

"She seemed comfortable. She seemed eager to address," Jackson said.  "I had the feeling this morning that she was ready for this. It's been going on for over a month, these efforts to destroy her reputation,” he added. “She wanted to meet it head on.” 

When the bishop spoke to Willis this morning before court, he said he told Willis "to keep praying and that the people have her back. I really believe they do."

Hearing ends for the day and Willis will continue testimony Friday 

From CNN's Holmes Lybrand and Dan Berman

The first day of an evidentiary hearing over whether to dismiss Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis from the Georgia election subversion case has concluded after Willis and her top prosecutor, Nathan Wade, testified over their relationships and payments they made during vacations together.

The district attorney's testimony will continue Friday at 9 a.m. ET, with Willis starting with under cross examination from District Attorney lawyer Anna Cross.

Defense attorney Ashleigh Merchant, who is leading the removal effort, said she plans to call two more witnesses after that.  

Cross also said she had three to four witnesses to call tomorrow, which she estimated would take four to five hours.

Willis: "I'm not on trial, no matter how hard you try to put me on trial"

From CNN's Devan Cole

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis testifies during a hearing on the Georgia election interference case on Thursday in Atlanta.

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis pushed back forcefully on Thursday as she engaged in a tense back and forth with a defense attorney seeking to disqualify her from the 2020 election interference case she’s brought against Donald Trump and others.

“You've been intrusive into people's personal lives. You're confused,” she told Ashleigh Merchant, an attorney for defendant Mike Roman.

“You think I'm on trial. These people are on trial for trying to steal an election in 2020,” she added, pointing toward the table of attorneys representing defendants in the criminal case.

Willis says Wade made sexist remarks during relationship

From CNN’s Devan Cole and Marshall Cohen

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis testifies during a hearing on the Georgia election interference case on Thursday in Atlanta.

In an extraordinary moment in court Thursday, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis testified about sexist behavior from Nathan Wade, the top prosecutor on the election interference case with whom she once had a romantic relationship.

“It's interesting that we're here about this money. Mr. Wade is used to women that, as he told me one time: 'The only thing a woman can do for him is make him a sandwich,'” she testified as she faced tough questioning from defense attorney Steve Sadow, who represents Donald Trump, about whether their romantic relationship ended last summer because of the forthcoming indictment against the former president and his allies. 

“We would have brutal arguments about the fact that I am your equal," she continued. "I don't need anything from a man — a man is not a plan. A man is a companion. And so there was tension always in our relationship, which is why I would give him his money back. I don't need anybody to foot my bills. The only man who's ever foot my bills completely is my daddy.” 

The defense attorneys have zeroed in on the timing of when the Willis-Wade relationship ended because it's critical to their self-dealing allegations against Willis.

In court filings, defendant Mike Roman's team argued that Willis would be incentivized to bring an indictment because it would prolong the case, and keep the money flowing to Wade. And, according to their theory, back to her as well, through vacations and other gifts.

Willis said on the stand that their break-up had “absolutely nothing” to do with the indictment.

Fulton County judge admonishes parties to remain professional

Fulton County Superior Judge Scott McAfee looks on during a hearing in the case of the State of Georgia v. Donald John Trump at the Fulton County Courthouse on February 15, in Atlanta, Georgia. 

Fulton County Judge Scott McAfee admonished parties in court on Thursday after heated exchanges between District Attorney Fani Willis and the defense attorney trying to get her removed from the Georgia election subversion case. 

“We all know what professionalism looks like,” McAfee said. “We won’t talk over each other. And from there, we’ll get through this.”

The judge took a brief break during Willis’ testimony after she raised her voice in court, holding up several motions filed by defense attorney Ashleigh Merchant and declaring: “It is a lie.” 

Merchant was asking if the top prosecutor she hired to investigate Trump had ever visited Willis “at the place you lay your head?”

“So let’s be clear because you’ve lied in this,” Willis said, pointing to copies she held of the filings. Willis, continuing to point at the copies, added, “right here, I think you lied right here.”

Willis details trips she took with top prosecutor in Trump case

District Attorney Fani Willis detailed vacations and trips she took with prosecutor Nathan Wade, who she hired to investigate Donald Trump and others for election interference in Georgia, saying she would pay cash for everything.

“When I travel I always pay cash,” Willis said of the trips with Wade, saying that she paid Wade back for certain travel and excursions during the trips.

Willis has been accused of financially benefitting from hiring Wade, who defense attorneys say paid for vacations for the two. The vacations, according to Willis, included trips to Aruba, the Bahamas Belize as well as Napa Valley where they attended wine tastings.

“He likes wine, I don’t really like wine to be honest with you,” Willis said. “I like Grey Goose.” 

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    Sarah Poser, Meredith Boyter Newlove—CDC via AP. An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday ...

  10. Unvaccinated young adult in New York becomes first US polio case in

    An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first US case in nearly a decade. Key points: Investigators are trying to figure out how the patient contracted the virus and whether others were exposed The patient is from Rockland County, a northern suburb of New York City which has been a centre of vaccine resistance

  11. First polio case since 2013 in U.S. reported in New York state

    New York reports first U.S. polio case in nearly a decade 00:18. New York state health officials on Thursday reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade.

  12. New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

    On Thursday, July 21, 2022, New York health officials reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade. Credit: Dr. Karp/Emory University/CDC via AP. Vaccines became available ...

  13. New York Reports 1st U.S. Polio Case In Nearly A Decade

    On Thursday, July 21, 2022, New York health officials reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade. (Sarah Poser, Meredith Boyter Newlove/CDC via AP) NEW YORK (AP) — An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday.

  14. New York Detects First U.S. Case of Polio in Nearly a Decade

    Polio, which mostly affects children, caused more than 15,000 cases of paralysis each year in the early 1950s. After implementation of the polio vaccines, cases fell below 100 in the 1960s and ...

  15. New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

    New York health officials are reporting the first U.S. case of polio, once one of the nation's most feared diseases, in nearly a decade.

  16. New York reports 1st U.S. polio case in close to a decade

    New York health officials on Thursday reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade. Officials said the Rockland County resident is an unvaccinated adult, but they did not detail ...

  17. New York Reports First Polio Case in a Decade—Here's What You Need to Know

    An unvaccinated NY man has polio, the first documented case in the U.S. since 2013. Here, doctors explain what polio is, its causes, symptoms, and vaccines.

  18. Public Health Response to a Case of Paralytic Poliomyelitis

    Public Health Response to a Case of Paralytic Poliomyelitis in an Unvaccinated Person and Detection of Poliovirus in Wastewater — New York, June-August 2022 Weekly / August 19, 2022 / 71 (33);1065-1068 On August 16, 2022, this report was posted online as an MMWR Early Release.

  19. New York reports first US polio case in nearly a decade

    NEW YORK - New York health officials on Thursday reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade. Officials said the Rockland County resident is an unvaccinated adult, but they did not detail the person's condition.

  20. New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

    NEW YORK (AP) — New York health officials on Thursday reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade. Officials said the Rockland County resident is an unvaccinated adult, but ...

  21. Opinion

    Still, the report was a fire alarm blaring in the capital because, fair or not, it crystallized the White House's problem. Biden refused to take the one-term win, bow out and make room for new ...

  22. Trump's Harsh Punishment Was Made Possible by This New York Law

    The $355 million penalty that a New York judge ordered Donald J. Trump to pay in his civil fraud trial might seem steep in a case with no victim calling for redress and no star witness pointing ...

  23. Read the full decision in Trump's New York civil fraud case

    New York Attorney General Letitia James brought the civil suit in 2022, seeking a penalty that grew to $370 million and asking the judge to bar Trump from doing business in the state.

  24. New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

    NEW YORK (AP) — An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday. Officials said the patient, who lives ...

  25. New York State Reports First US Polio Case in Nearly a Decade

    An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted polio, the first U.S. case in nearly a decade, health officials said Thursday. Officials said the patient, who lives in...

  26. Rep. Elise Stefanik files complaint against New York attorney general

    In November, she filed an ethics complaint against state Judge Arthur Engoron, who is presiding over the New York civil fraud case against Trump, and the following month she filed a complaint ...

  27. New York reports first U.S. polio case in nearly a decade

    On Thursday, July 21, 2022, New York health officials reported a polio case, the first in the U.S. in nearly a decade. NEW YORK — An unvaccinated young adult from New York recently contracted ...

  28. Can Trump pay? What if he doesn't? Here's what to know ...

    NEW YORK — A seven-figure verdict, an eight-figure verdict and, now, a nine-figure verdict. Donald Trump has been hit with all three in the past nine months, with Friday's $354 million penalty ...

  29. Trump Fraud Trial Penalty Will Exceed $450 Million

    A New York judge on Friday handed Donald J. Trump a crushing defeat in his civil fraud case, finding the former president liable for conspiring to manipulate his net worth and ordering him to pay ...

  30. Live updates: Fani Willis testifies in Trump Georgia case hearing

    Trump attends New York hearing: A judge set March 25 as the trial date for his New York hush money case. It will mark the first time an ex-president and potential presidential nominee will be ...